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IoT-Driven Reuse Business Models: The Case of Salesianer Textile Rental Services

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Service business models such as rental, leasing, and performance contracting can contribute to a circular economy by keeping products, components, and materials longer in use and thereby preserving their value over time. These business models are, however, subject to higher complexity and information demand. Smart products and the Internet of Things facilitate the optimisation of such closed-loop value creation processes. We present an in-depth case study of a textile rental firm, in the business-to-business domain, that has recently become a front-runner in using textiles equipped with RFID chips. The firm has used smart textiles to improve the transparency of the product life cycle, raise awareness on textile losses, and improve procurement decisions. We show that combining smart textiles with a rental business model could accelerate the transition towards circularity and sustainability.
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... Therefore, smart products may bring about essential changes in the architecture of the offering of the firm. Firms may increasingly develop packages of smart products and services, that is, product-service systems (PSS) that include circular strategies (e.g., Alcayaga et al., 2021). ...
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The rise and fall of organizational effectiveness, an "umbrella construct" once at the forefront of organizational theory, is traced through four life-cycle stages: emerging excitement, the validity challenge, "tidying up with typologies," and construct collapse. Although the study of effectiveness has declined, re- search on its component elements continues to thrive. Using the effectiveness story as an exemplar, we develop a more general model of this process for all umbrella constructs, defined here as broad concepts used to encompass and account for a diverse set of phenomena. This life-cycle model—driven largely by a dialectic between researchers with a broad perspective ("um- brella advocates") and those with a narrower one ("validity po- lice")—leaves open the possibility that some umbrella con- structs may ultimately be made coherent or remain permanently controversial rather than collapse, as effectiveness has done. We propose that umbrella constructs will arise most frequently in academic fields without a theoretical consensus, will inevitably have their validity seriously challenged, will have a shorter life than their constituent elements, and will be more vulnerable to validity challenges when they lack support from practitioners. This model's implications for the future direction of such cur- rent umbrella constructs as organizational learning, culture, strategy, and performance are also explored and elaborated. Ironically, some evidence suggests that studies around the con- struct of organizational "performance" have arisen to replace the nearly identical, but fallen umbrella construct of organiza- tional effectiveness. (Sociology of Organization Science ; Paradigms; Theory Development; Organization Theory; Umbrella Con- structs) The question for organizational science is whether the field can strike an appropriate balance between theoretical tyranny and an anything-goes attitude. (Pfeffer 1993, p. 616)
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Research on sustainability transitions has expanded rapidly in the last ten years, diversified in terms of topics and geographical applications, and deepened with respect to theories and methods. This article provides an extensive review and an updated research agenda for the field, classified into nine main themes: understanding transitions; power, agency and politics; governing transitions; civil society, culture and social movements; businesses and industries; transitions in practice and everyday life; geography of transitions; ethical aspects; and methodologies. The review shows that the scope of sustainability transitions research has broadened and connections to established disciplines have grown stronger. At the same time, we see that the grand challenges related to sustainability remain unsolved, calling for continued efforts and an acceleration of ongoing transitions. Transition studies can play a key role in this regard by creating new perspectives, approaches and understanding and helping to move society in the direction of sustainability.
Article
This study covers new trends and techniques in the field of predictive maintenance, which has been superseding traditional management policies, at least in part. It also presents suggestions for how to implement a predictive maintenance programme in a factory/premise and so on. Predictive maintenance primarily involves foreseeing breakdown of the system to be maintained by detecting early signs of failure in order to make maintenance work more proactive. In addition to the aim of acting before failure, it also aims to attend to any fault, even if there is no immediate danger of failure, to ensure smooth operation and reduce energy consumption. Predictive maintenance has been adopted by various sectors in manufacturing and service industries in order to improve reliability, safety, availability, efficiency and quality as well as to protect the environment. It also has created a separate sector, which specializes in developing predictive maintenance instruments, offering dedicated predictive maintenance solutions and training predictive maintenance experts. Predictive maintenance techniques are closely associated with sensor technologies but for efficient predictive maintenance applications, a comprehensive approach, which integrates sensing with subsequent maintenance activities, is needed to be adapted in accordance with the needs of the particular organization. Recent advances in information, communication and computer technologies, such as Internet of Things and radio-frequency identifications, have been enabling predictive maintenance applications to be more efficient, applicable, affordable, and consequently more common and available for all sorts of industries. Researches on remote maintenance and e-maintenance have been supporting predictive maintenance activities especially in unsafe working environments and scattered locations.
Article
The concept of circular economy (CE) is to an increasing extent treated as a solution to series of challenges such as waste generation, resource scarcity and sustaining economic benefits. However the concept of circularity is not of novel as such. Specific circumstances and motivations have stimulated ideas relevant to circularity in the past through activities such as reuse, remanufacturing or recycling. Main objectives of this work are: to provide a comprehensive review of research efforts encompassing aspects of resources scarcity, waste generation and economic advantages; to explore the CE landscape in the context of these three aspects especially when they are considered simultaneously; based on an idea of a comprehensive CE framework, propose an implementation strategy using top-down and bottom-up approach in a concurrent manner. To fulfill this objective a comprehensive review of state-of-the-art research is carried out to understand different ideas relevant to CE, motivation for the research and context of their recurrence. Main contributions of this paper are a comprehensive CE framework and a practical implementation strategy for a regenerative economy and natural environment. The framework emphasizes on a combined view of three main aspects i.e. environment, resources and economic benefits. It also underlines that joint support of all stakeholders is necessary in order to successfully implement the CE concept at large scale. The proposed framework and implementation strategy also identify new avenues for future research and practice in the field of CE.
Article
RFID, complemented by other Auto-ID technologies such as Barcode, NFC and sensor technology, can unlock huge benefits for enterprises and users, creating successful businesses with the combination of technology and processes. It is important to have an understanding of all aspects and properties of the technology, in order to see its potential. This solution-orientated book contains a comprehensive overview of RFID, explaining which elements can be applied with respect to specific project environments, and how RFID systems can be integrated into existing IT systems. It includes chapters and project guidelines written by top experts in the industry, covering global privacy issues and the history of EPCglobal, as well as: a discussion on current trends and developments in the RFID market, and the process-based and technological drivers behind it; a chapter on RFID legislation with a global perspective; descriptions of practical applications and twelve application scenarios, demonstrating the possibilities that have already been discovered with RFID. RFID for the Optimization of Business Processes is a descriptive introduction to the technology for business and technical managers, IT consulting experts and business process designers, as well as marketers of RFID technologies. The text will also be of great use to technical experts interested in business processes and also students studying the subject.
Chapter
Beginning with an historical background, tracing the origins of reusable healthcare textiles and their contribution to the development of the sterile field, the overview details products used in the twenty-first century. Surgical packs and their components, protective apparel and incontinence materials are discussed, among other medical textile products. Physical properties and performance characteristics of various reusable items are outlined for numerous products. Factors related to the environment and health and safety issues are also discussed. The chapter offers a broad coverage of reusable medical textiles for both experienced readers and those new to the subject.
Article
While a consensus appears to have evolved among many sustainability researchers and practitioners that sustainable development at the societal level is not very likely without the sustainable development of organizations, the business model as a key initiating component of corporate sustainability has only recently moved into the focus of sustainability management research. Apparently, the usual approaches to sustainable development of philanthropy, corporate social responsibility, and technological process and product innovation are insufficient to create the necessary radical transformation of organizations, industries, and societies toward genuine, substantive sustainable development. More in-depth research is needed on whether both modified and completely new business models can help develop integrative and competitive solutions by either radically reducing negative and/or creating positive external effects for the natural environment and society.
Article
Since the 1990s, Product Service Systems (PSS) have been heralded as one of the most effective instruments for moving society towards a resource-efficient, circular economy and creating a much-needed ‘resource revolution’. This paper reviews the literature on PSS in the last decade and compares the findings with those from an earlier review in this journal in 2006. Close to 300 relevant papers were identified, over 140 of which have been referenced in this review. Research in the field of PSS has become more prolific, with the output of refereed papers quadrupling since 2000, while on average scientific output has only doubled. PSS has also become embedded in a wider range of science fields (such as manufacturing, ICT, business management, and design) and geographical regions (Asia now produces more papers than Europe). The literature of the last seven years has refined insights with regard to the design of PSS, as well as their business and environmental benefits, and confirmed the definitions and PSS concepts already available in 2006. A major contribution of the recent literature is research into how firms have implemented PSS in their organization and what the key success factors and issues that require special attention are (such as a focus on product availability for clients; an emphasis on diversity in terms of services provided rather than the range of products; and the need for staff to possess both knowledge of the product and relationship management skills). The reasons why PSS have nonetheless still not been widely implemented, particularly in the B2C context, seem to have already been explained fairly well in the literature available in 2006. For consumers, having control over things, artifacts, and life itself is one of the most valued attributes. PSS are often less accessible, or have less intangible value, than the competing product, in part because PSS usually do not allow consumers as much behavioral freedom or even leave them with the impression that the PSS provider could prescribe how they should behave.
Conference Paper
Increasingly firms develop technology-based sharing approaches where users rent, lease and share products, instead of purchasing them. Particularly, the product service system (PSS) concept has recently caught attention by scholars from different disciplines, although surprisingly little from the innovation research community. The writings from our colleagues however lead us to suspect that PSS developing firms might pursue an innovation behavior that is much more in line with recent societal demands for reducing environmental externalities. Recent examples show that adopting the PSS approach could be a way even for profit-driven firms towards a more sustainable economy, actually without too much governmental intervention.However, to our knowledge this argument has yet been hardly discussed in detail. Drawing on concepts from the innovation management literature as well as from environmental management research, we contribute a model that explains why the PSS approach can shift firm innovation behavior towards generating fewer environmental externalities. This model links firm innovation behavior to three antecedents, including two product related characteristics (ownership, product purpose) and the specifics of the PSS related profit function. We argue that these antecedents differ whether firms develop products or PSSs. In the latter case the antecedent specifications impact firms’ R&D objectives in a way that creates incentives to follow innovation trajectories that lead to a reduction of environmental externalities (i.e., eco-innovation behavior).
Article
Sustainability oriented innovation and technology studies have received increasing attention over the past 10-15 years. In particular, a new field dealing with "sustainability transitions" has gained ground and reached an output of 60-100 academic papers per year. In this article, we aim to identify the intellectual contours of this emerging field by conducting a review of basic conceptual frameworks, together with bibliographical analysis of 540 journal articles in the field. It is against this background that we position the six papers assembled in a special section in Research Policy. These papers pave the way for new conceptual developments and serve as stepping-stones in the maturation of sustainability transition studies, by linking with the scholarly literatures of management studies, sociology, policy studies, economic geography, and modeling.
Article
Function-oriented business models or product–service systems (PSSs) are often seen as an excellent means for achieving ‘factor 4’. SusProNet, an EU network on PSSs, showed a more complicated reality. At least eight different types of PSS exist, with quite diverging economic and environmental characteristics. The economic potential of each type was evaluated in terms of (i) tangible and intangible value for the user, (ii) tangible costs and risk premium for the provider, (iii) capital/investment needs and (iv) issues such as the providers' position in the value chain and client relations. The environmental potential was evaluated by checking the relevance of certain impact reduction mechanisms (e.g. more intensive use of capital goods, inherent incentives for sustainable user and provider behaviour etc.). Most PSS types will result in marginal environmental improvements at best. The exception is the PSS type known as functional results, but here liability and risk premium issues, amongst others, need a solution. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment.
Article
In the last decade ‘sectoral systems of innovation’ have emerged as a new approach in innovation studies. This article makes four contributions to the approach by addressing some open issues. The first contribution is to explicitly incorporate the user side in the analysis. Hence, the unit of analysis is widened from sectoral systems of innovation to socio-technical systems. The second contribution is to suggest an analytical distinction between systems, actors involved in them, and the institutions which guide actor’s perceptions and activities. Thirdly, the article opens up the black box of institutions, making them an integral part of the analysis. Institutions should not just be used to explain inertia and stability. They can also be used to conceptualise the dynamic interplay between actors and structures. The fourth contribution is to address issues of change from one system to another. The article provides a coherent conceptual multi-level perspective, using insights from sociology, institutional theory and innovation studies. The perspective is particularly useful to analyse long-term dynamics, shifts from one socio-technical system to another and the co-evolution of technology and society.
Article
Corporations increasingly subscribe to the principles of corporate sustainability, which is generally described as the integration of economic, environmental and social dimensions. Concerning innovation management, this emphasises the role of sustainability-oriented innovations (SOI). SOI is considered a tool both to address sustainability issues and to tap into new customer segments and markets. Yet SOI are very risky: both their market success and non-economic sustainability are uncertain. This paper presents a generic model termed the "Sustainability Innovation Cube" (SIC) for structuring innovations' sustainability effects in order to better inform corporate decision-makers about how to minimize the directional risk of SOI. The model includes the three dimensions: target, life cycle and innovation type. A qualitative expert study reveals the opportunities and challenges related to the developed model. Finally, practical implications are derived, limitations are discussed and a brief outlook is given.
New product development and testing strategies for clothing longevity: An overview of a UK research study
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Cooper, T., Oxborrow, L., Claxton, S., Goworek, H., Hill, H., & McLaren, A. (2017). New product development and testing strategies for clothing longevity: An overview of a UK research study. In C. A. Bakker & R. Mugge (Eds.), Vol. 9. Research in design series, PLATE 2017 conference proceedings (pp. 94-97). IOS Press BV. https://doi.org/10.3233/978-1-61499-820-4-94
Circular Business Models: Overcoming barriers, unleashing potentials. Series Circular Economy Initiative Deutschland, no. Working Group 1. acatech - Deutsche Akademie der Technikwissenschaften e
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Hansen, E. G., Wiedemann, P., Fichter, K., Lüdeke-Freund, F., Jaeger-Erben, M., Schomerus, T., Alcayaga, A., Blomsma, F., Tischner, U., Ahle, U., Büchle, D., Denker, A., Fiolka, K., Fröhling, M., Häge, A., Hoffmann, V., Kohl, H., Nitz, T., Schiller, C., … Kadner, S. (2020). Circular Business Models: Overcoming barriers, unleashing potentials. Series Circular Economy Initiative Deutschland, no. Working Group 1. acatech -Deutsche Akademie der Technikwissenschaften e.V.; SYSTEMIQ. https://www.circular-economyinitiative.de/publikationen
Fixing fashion: Clothing consumption and sustainability. (Sixteenth report of session
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Delhaize in Belgium confirms its innovating role in fresh produce logistics
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Leblanc, R. (2011). Delhaize in Belgium confirms its innovating role in fresh produce logistics. https://packagingrevolution.net/delhaize-in-belgium-confirmsits-innovating-role-in-fresh-produce-logistics/
Neue Produkte in der digitalen Welt
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Noll, E., Zisler, K., Neuburger, R., Eberspächer, J., & Dowling, M. (2016). Neue Produkte in der digitalen Welt. Münchner Kreis.
The business model: Recent developments and future research
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