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The effects of contour and highlighting makeup on the perception of facial form

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Abstract

This chapter discusses the historical and contemporary concepts of female facial beauty. We introduce the concepts of sexualization of the facial skeleton through selective sex-hormone responsive regions of the face that result in structural differences that are perceived as masculine or feminine. The principles of contour and highlighting makeup (CHM) and their effects of modifications to the perceived facial anatomy, mimicking the effects of plastic surgery procedures are explained. The opportunity to incorporate makeup artistry to enhance surgical results and reduce postoperative stigmata of surgery thus accelerates the patient’s emotional recovery. Additionally, if revision is necessary, CHM and injectable fillers may create the illusion of the desired result to allay patient anxiety before the optimal time for surgical revision. Various modes of for aesthetic improvement are discussed including CHM, filler injections, botulinum toxin A, permanent hair removal, and microblading along with other cosmetic tattoo techniques.

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