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Assessing the applicability of geographical indications from the social capital analysis perspective: Evidences from Albania

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Abstract

This ex-ante study explores the readiness of local stakeholders in a rural area to undertake the collective actions necessary to create a Geographical Indication on cheese to protect it from unfair competitiveness provided by brand usurpation. The paper provides an analytical model employable to assess the willingness of local stakeholders to cooperate on achieving a common goal in different post-communist rural areas. The proposed model combines operationalised, cognitive, and structural social capital indicators with Ostrom Conditions on collective action, referring to symmetric interests. Thus, it represents a methodology to realise a priori whether a local rural community is willing to undertake collective action to achieve a common objective. One hundred cheese producers were interviewed using scenario type questions. The results show that symmetric interests have the lowest effect on willingness to cooperate compared to structural social capital and demographics. The study indicates that better-educated respondents are more willing to cooperate than less well-educated. As in other post-communist countries, the educational and demographic factors can become an essential element, which may help overcome the negative perceptions of cooperation from the past. JEL Classification: 0350, P2, P3

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... Kokthi et al., 2016;Kokthi & Kruja, (2017b) found that the mountainous origin and cultural values, such as tradition and heritage on specific pastoral areas, substantially impact the consumer's willingness to pay (WTP) for a typical pastoral product. Positive perceptions about traditional grazing are linked to the higher quality of pastoral products in the marketplace (Imami et al., 2016;Kokthi et al., 2016Kokthi et al., , 2021Kokthi & Kruja, 2017a). ...
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Diffusion du document : publique Diplôme : Dr. d'Universite
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Published as: "The Nature of Common-Pool Resource Problems," Rationality and Society 2(3), July 1990, 335-358. "A large, multidisciplinary literature focuses on the problems occurring when multiple individuals concurrently use common-pool resources such as fisheries, grazing areas, airsheds, oil pools, and irrigation systems. Some scholars presume that all such problems share a single underlying theoretical structure -- that of an iterated, Prisoner's Dilemma game or of a collective action problem. Others have used more specific models, such as those of rent dissipation and technical externalities, to analyze these problems. On the other hand, many descriptions of the problems faced by individuals using common-pool resources do not rely on any theoretical structure to organize empirical research or test hypotheses. It is possible to learn from these descriptions about a wide variety of institutional arrangements that the users of common-pool resources have devised to change incentives and avoid the predicted theoretical outcomes. The institutional arrangements used to enable multiple users to manage common-pool resources are so diverse, however, that it is hard to imagine that they are all directed at helping individuals solve exactly the same set of problems."
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Environmental Labeling, Protected Geographical Indications and the Interests of Developing Countries
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