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Visual plasticity: Illuminating the role of the hippocampus in cortical sensory encoding

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Abstract

The primary visual cortex has the capacity to store stimulus-specific information locally. A new study reveals a direct role for the hippocampus in experience-dependent cortical plasticity when visual stimuli are presented in a predictable temporal order.

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Activities of visual cortical and hippocampal neurons co-fluctuate in freely moving rats during spatial behavior
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