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Abstract

The shared autonomous vehicle (SAV) is a new concept that meets the upcoming trends of autonomous driving and changing demands in urban transportation. SAVs can carry passengers and parcels simultaneously, making use of dedicated passenger and parcel modules on board. A fleet of SAVs could partly take over private transport, taxi, and last-mile delivery services. A reduced fleet size compared to conventional transportation modes would lead to less traffic congestion in urban centres. This paper presents a method to estimate the optimal capacity for the passenger and parcel compartments of SAVs. The problem is presented as a vehicle routing problem and is named variable capacity share-a-ride-problem (VCSARP). The model has a MILP formulation and is solved using a commercial solver. It seeks to create the optimal routing schedule between a randomly generated set of pick-up and drop-off requests of passengers and parcels. The objective function aims to minimize the total energy costs of each schedule, which is a trade-off between travelled distance and vehicle capacity. Different scenarios are composed by altering parameters, representing travel demand at different times of the day. The model results show the optimized cost of each simulation along with associated routes and vehicle capacities.

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... Their results suggest, that the vehicle miles traveled for freight purposes increase due to additional access and egress trips. Van der Tholen et al. [63] present a method to estimate the optimal capacity for the passenger and parcel compartments of AMoD systems. They aim at creating an optimal routing schedule between a randomly generated set of pick-up and drop-off requests of passengers and parcels. ...
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  • J Černý
Černý, J.: Testing of Five Different Types of Electric Buses. In: Proc. of the CIV-ITAS Forum Conference 2015. Ljubljana, Slovenia (2015)
United Nations; Department of Economic and Social Affairs; Population Division: World Urbanization Prospects: The 2018 Revision
United Nations; Department of Economic and Social Affairs; Population Division: World Urbanization Prospects: The 2018 Revision. United Nations, New York (2019)