Conference Paper

Framework for Involving Citizens in Human Smart City Projects Using Collaborative Events

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Abstract

With the emergence of Human Smart Cities, the involvement and participation of citizens in city improvement projects has acquired the greatest relevance. To empower citizen participation, the implementation of co-production mechanisms that provide a balanced, equal, and transparent relationship between citizens and public sector in an evolving digital era is of utmost importance. This research proposes a framework to structure and facilitate collaboration between citizens and the public administration to solve problems linked to the city ecosystem, based on the concept and components of co-production. In our framework, the main point of contact between the public sector and citizens lies in different types of collaborative events and crowdsourcing campaigns. The opinions of citizens with respect to some details of the implementation of the proposed framework are also collected and analyzed.

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