PosterPDF Available

Shifting Online: 12 Tips for Online Teaching Derived from Contemporary Educational Psychology Research

Authors:

Abstract

Poster based upon paper: Sepp, S., Wong, M., Hoogerheide, V., Castro-Alonso, J.C.(2021) Shifting Online: 12 Tips for Online Teaching Derived from Contemporary Educational Psychology Research. Manuscript submitted for publication.
Distal
Middle
Proximal
Metacarpal
A
B
C
D
A. Distal
B. Middle
C. Proximal
D. Metacarpal
Split Attention Effect: When presenting visual information such as
diagrams or graphs with explanatory text, place text within the
diagram, at spatially nearby locations, instead of off to the side or
below, like a map legend.
Tracing Effect: When studying visual learning materials such as
diagrams or charts, teachers can encourage students to trace or
use other hand gestures if they find it beneficial for their own
learning.
Transient Information Effect: When using multimedia materials,
ensure that new concepts are not covered too quickly, and instead
slow down the presentation, ‘chunk’ information into smaller, more
digestible resources, or allow students agency to control playback of
these materials.
Human Movement Effect: Like the first-person perspective effect,
when presenting procedural motor tasks for students to learn, use
animations, and present them from a first-person perspective.
Generative Learning : In contrast to passive absorption of novel
concepts and traditional studying techniques, learners benefit from
generation and creation of their own understanding. Teachers can
encourage active engagement with new ideas through
summarising, practice testing, and the creation of video tutorials to
teach others.
Example-based Learning: In STEM domains that involve problem-
solving based on established rules and sequences, provide worked
out examples for students to study in conjunction with practice
tasks / questions.
Signalling Principle: When presenting novel information, add visual
cues to guide learner attention to key areas either by using colour,
symbols or text on diagrams.
Spacing Effect: When learning online, allow time for learners to ‘reset,
allowing space for them to rest and replenish their cognitive resources
before continuing, either in a synchronous learning environment or
asynchronous lessons.
Modality Effect: When using multimedia, ensure that auditory
(verbal) explanations support visual materials (text or images)
without being redundant.
Instructor Visible Effect: When teaching online instructor presence
is crucial to establishing community through social connections.
Additionally, when presenting information through video or
multimedia, a visible instructor who gestures, or provides other
visible cues to guide attention can support learning.
First Person Perspective Effect: In learning domains that involve
procedural motor tasks such as learning a new skill using one’s
hands, presenting video demonstrations from the first person,
instead of the third person perspective, can support learning.
Redundancy Effect: When presenting novel information to learners,
ensure that auditory and written explanations do not replicate
already-presented visual information exactly, but instead highlight
key points and serve to enhance learner understanding. If
redundant information is present, consider removing it.
When hot air rises, it cools and
condenses creating the air droplets to
gather together and form clouds.
These clouds, in turn, become more
dense with temperature changes and
can drop water on the surrounding
landscape
When hot air rises, it cools and
condenses creating the air droplets
to gather together and form clouds.
These clouds, in turn, become more
dense with temperature changes
and can drop water on the
surrounding landscape
When hot air rises, it cools and
condenses creating the air droplets
to gather together and form clouds.
These clouds, in turn, become more
dense with temperature changes
and can drop water on the
surrounding landscape
When hot air rises, it cools and
condenses creating the air droplets to
gather together and form clouds. These
clouds, in turn, become more dense with
temperature changes and can drop
water on the surrounding landscape
When hot air rises, it cools and
condenses creating the air droplets to
gather together and form clouds. These
clouds, in turn, become more dense with
temperature changes and can drop
water on the surrounding landscape
The distal bones
form the fingertips
in humans, making
it very useful for a
number of tasks.
The distal bones on
cats, however are
where their claws
are attached.
The distal bones
form the fingertips
in humans, making
it very useful for a
number of tasks.
The distal bones on
cats, however are
where their claws
are attached.
The distal bones
form the fingertips
in humans, making
it very useful for a
number of tasks.
The distal bones on
cats, however are
where their claws
are attached.
c
b
a = 60°
The ANGLE TYPE is Corresponding.
These Angles are equal. Angle a is
60, so b is 60 as well. Angles on a
parallel line add up to 180, so if b is
60, then c is 180 minus 60 and we
end up with 120°
c = 180° - b
c = 180° - 60°
c = 120°
a = 60°
a=b
b = 60°
c
b
a = 60°
ANGLE TYPE: Corresponding
These Angles are equal
a = 60°
a=b
b = 60°
Angles on a parallel line add up to 180°
c = 180° - b
c = 180° - 60°
c = 120°
c
b
a = 60°
Solve for c
Lesson 1
Lesson 2
Lesson 3
Lesson 4
BREAK TIME
Lesson 1
Lesson 3
Lesson 2
Lesson 4
c
b
a = 60°
Solve for c
c
b
a = 60°
Solve for c
Shifting Online:
12 Tips for Online Teaching Derived from Contemporary
Educational Psychology Research
12
4
56
7
10
11 12
8
123
aSchool of Education, University of New England, Armidale, Australia
bYew Chung College of Early Childhood Education, Hong Kong, Hong Kong
cDepartment of Education, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands
dCenter for Advanced Research in Education, Institute of Education, Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile
Stoo Seppa, Mona Wongb, Vincent Hoogerheidec, and Juan C. Castro-Alonsod
9
http://www.stoosepp.com/icltc2021/
... For practitioners, it is important to have some concrete suggestions for how to put those characteristics into practice. Therefore, the next subsections will provide some concrete suggestions and examples (per label) that come from the included studies and other recent studies (e.g., Huang, 2018;Sepp et al., 2021). This overview is, of course, inexhaustible and therefore not comprehensive. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background Since about 2010 e‐learning has been embedded in educational practice and has become, surely due to the Covid‐19 pandemic, increasingly important. Objectives Although much has been written about e‐learning, little is known about crucial didactic and pedagogical design principles for e‐learning. This review tried to fill that gap. Methods Based on a systematic literature review, 42 studies (out of 1857 unique hits) were included that address e‐learning design in higher education. Open and axial coding was used for analysis. Results and conclusions There were two continuums distinguished as important for e‐learning: (1) the active learning continuum and (2) the authentic learning continuum. Those continuums appear to be useful to give a visual representation of included studies through an active and authentic learning continuum. This resulted in four clusters with (slightly) different properties. These properties vary from a relatively low to a high level of authenticity, and from teacher to student centred. Analysis also revealed four crucial aspects for e‐learning design: (1) content scaffolding, (2) process scaffolding, (3) peer‐to‐peer learning, and (4) formative strategies. In general, most of the e‐learning approaches demand an educational design that facilitates authentic learning and self‐regulation. Takeaways To help practitioners in realizing e‐learning design, this paper will provide some concrete suggestions and tips for e‐learning design. Furthermore, this research shows that more well‐founded research is necessary to gain more insight in didactic and pedagogical design principles for e‐learning.
Article
Full-text available
Background Mobile‐based assessment has been an active area of research in the field of mobile learning. Prior research has demonstrated that mobile‐based assessment systems positively affect student performance. However, it is still unclear why and how these systems positively affect student performance. Objectives This study aims to identify the determinants of student performance during students' use of a mobile‐based assessment application in a formative assessment activity as part of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) courses in higher education. Methods A structural model based on hypotheses was validated using PLS‐SEM with data from the interaction of 127 students of eight EFL courses from the A1 and A2 levels of English that used a mobile‐based assessment system for a period of 4 weeks. Automatic data collection in the application and self‐reported instruments were applied. Results and Conclusions Use of scaffolding mechanisms, time on‐task and reported effort are strong predictors of students' learning outcomes. The use of scaffolding strategies predicts students' time on‐task. The provision of corrective feedback is not a predictor of students' learning performance but predicts other constructs such as perceived usefulness and the behavioural intention to use. Implications Mobile‐based assessment systems should include scaffolding mechanisms and integrate strategies to increase the perceived relevance of the formative assessment activity to increase the student learning performance. Scaffolding mechanisms are also useful to increase the student time on‐task in the formative assessment activity. In mobile‐based formative assessment activities more elaborated forms of feedback other than corrective feedback are needed to increase student performance.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.