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Abstract

This is a comprehensive database of critical oxygen (Pcrit) values from freshwater, marine and euryhaline teleost fish compiled from published literature. The database incorporates 331 measurements of Pcrit from a total of 96 published studies and covers 151 fish species from 58 families. It provided the opportunity to critically examine methodologies for determining Pcrit as well as its usefulness as an indicator of hypoxia tolerance in fish. Additional data are included (when available) on various abiotic and biotic interactions with hypoxia and their effect on Pcrit. These included: water temperature, salinity, pH, carbon dioxide, sex, photoperiod, diet, ration size, body size (mass and length), respirometry method. The aim was to provide a widely accessible central repository of physiological trait data that will facilitate future studies of fish ecology, conservation and management. The data set was acquired by a selection of dedicated studies from 1974-2015 covering an extensive geographic coverage includes at least one entry from every continent, although North America, Europe and Australasia. The data set included details on carbon dioxide; CO2; critical oxygen tension; metabolic rate; oxygen and capacity limitation of thermal tolerance (OCLTT); physiological trait.
D O I :
1 0 . 1 4 4 6 6 / C e f a s D a t a H u b . 1 2 1
Database of critical oxygen level (Pcrit) in freshwater and
marine fishes 1974 - 2015
Description
This is a comprehensive database of critical oxygen (Pcrit) values from
freshwater, marine and euryhaline teleost fish compiled from published
literature. The database incorporates 331 measurements of Pcrit from a total
of 96 published studies and covers 151 fish species from 58 families. It
provided the opportunity to critically examine methodologies for determining
Pcrit as well as its usefulness as an indicator of hypoxia tolerance in fish.
Additional data are included (when available) on various abiotic and biotic
interactions with hypoxia and their effect on Pcrit. These included: water
temperature, salinity, pH, carbon dioxide, sex, photoperiod, diet, ration size,
body size (mass and length), respirometry method. The aim was to provide a
widely accessible central repository of physiological trait data that will facilitate
future studies of fish ecology, conservation and management. The data set was
acquired by a selection of dedicated studies from 1974-2015 covering an
extensive geographic coverage includes at least one entry from every
continent, although North America, Europe and Australasia. The data set
included details on carbon dioxide; CO2; critical oxygen tension; metabolic
rate; oxygen and capacity limitation of thermal tolerance (OCLTT); physiological
trait.
Contributors
Rogers, Nicholas J. / Urbina, Mauricio A. / Reardon, Erin E. / McKenzie, David J. /
Birchenough, Silvana N.R. / Wilson, Rod W.
Subject
Fish behaviour / Fish / Indicator / Carbonate System / Dissolved oxygen
parameters in the water column
Start Date
01/03/2014
End Date
30/01/2016
Year Published
2021
Version
1
Citation
Rogers et al, Cefas (2021). Database of critical oxygen level (Pcrit) in freshwater
and marine fishes 1974 - 2015. Cefas, UK. V1.
doi: https://doi.org/10.14466/CefasDataHub.121
Rights List
Open Government Licence
DOI
10.14466/CefasDataHub.121
Data Links
http://data.cefas.co.uk/#/View/21100

File (1)

Content uploaded by Mauricio A. Urbina
Author content
... A pre-existing database on fish P crit (Rogers et al. 2021), was expanded with data from papers published between January 2016 and March 2021. New papers were sourced from Web of Science Core Collection using the following keyword combinations of Boolean terms: (P-crit OR critical oxygen tension OR loss of equilibrium OR Limiting oxygen) and (fish OR teleost OR bony fish). ...
... A pre-existing database on fish P crit (Rogers et al., 2021) was expanded with data from papers published between January 2016 and March 2021. New papers were sourced from the Web of Science Core Collection using the following keyword combinations of Boolean terms: (P-crit or critical oxygen tension or loss of equilibrium or limiting oxygen) and (fish or teleost or bony fish). ...
Article
Full-text available
Aerobic metabolism generates 15-20 times more energy (ATP) than anaerobic metabolism , which is crucial in maintaining energy budgets in animals, fueling metabolism, activity, growth and reproduction. For ectothermic water-breathers such as fishes, low dissolved oxygen may limit oxygen uptake and hence aerobic metabolism. Here, we assess, within a phylogenetic context, how abiotic and biotic drivers explain the variation in hypoxia tolerance observed in fishes. To do so, we assembled a database of hypoxia tolerance, measured as critical oxygen tensions (P crit) for 195 fish species. Overall, we found that hypoxia tolerance has a clear phylogenetic signal and is further modulated by temperature, body mass, cell size, salinity and metabolic rate. Marine fishes were more susceptible to hypoxia than freshwater fishes. This pattern is consistent with greater fluctuations in oxygen and temperature in freshwater habitats. Fishes with higher oxygen requirements (e.g. a high metabolic rate relative to body mass) also were more susceptible to hypoxia. We also found evidence that hypoxia and warming can act synergistically, as hypoxia tolerance was generally lower in warmer waters. However, we found significant interactions between temperature and the body and cell size of a fish. Constraints in oxygen uptake related to cellular surface area to volume ratios and effects of viscosity on the thickness of the boundary layers enveloping the gills could explain these thermal dependencies. The lower hypoxia tolerance in warmer waters was particularly pronounced for fishes with larger bodies and larger cell sizes. Previous studies have found a wide diversity in the direction and strength of relationships between P crit and body mass. By including interactions with temperature, our study may help resolve these divergent findings, explaining the size dependency of hypoxia tolerance in fish.
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