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Authentic Leadership Skills Within A Developing Economy Context

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Abstract

To date, the gap between mature and emerging economies has widened.The disparity is attributed to a failure of organisational leadership and this has been a subject of interest to scholars. This complexity is further amplified by the rapid pace of global competition, financial scandals and leadership malfeasance. As a result, authentic leadership is proposed as an approach that addresses leadership gaps within contemporary organisations. Taken as a whole, this approach-whether focused on attaining organisational outcomes, extends beyond to promoting the collective good within the society. And as such, is best positioned to drive productivity within a developing market context.

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Chapter
The purpose of this chapter is, firstly, to assess the similarities between the traits of authenticity and authentic leadership, as viewed by researchers using two different perspectives historically used to define authenticity: the existential perspective and the psychological perspective. Secondly, using a correlational design, the chapter goes through an exploration of the relationship between authenticity and authentic leadership in a French-Canadian population using a quantitative approach. This chapter thus provides a relevant exploration of the evolution of the concept of authentic leadership and various observations of its impact on followers, integrating the existential perspective to respond to continuing concerns regarding coherence between authentic leadership and the concept from which it is derived, namely authenticity.
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Drawing on cognitive moral development and moral identity theories, this study empirically examines the moral antecedents and consequences of authentic leadership. Machiavellianism, an individual difference variable relating to the use of the ‘end justifies the means’ principle, is predicted to affect the link between morality and leadership. Analyses of multi-source, multi-method data comprised case studies, simulations, role-playing exercises, and survey questionnaires were completed by 70 managers in a large public agency, and provide support for our hypotheses. Our findings reveal that Machiavellianism offsets the positive relationship between moral reasoning and authentic leadership. Specifically, we show that when Machiavellianism is high, both the positive relationship between moral reasoning and authentic leadership, and the positive relationship between authentic leadership and moral actions, are reversed. This study offers new insights on the underlying processes contributing to the emergence of leaders’ authentic behavior and moral action. Implications for the moral development of leaders, and directions for improved leadership training are provided.
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Purpose – The purpose of this longitudinal study was to evaluate a three-year training program based on action learning principles with regard to its effectiveness in fostering authentic leadership and mindfulness among the participants. Design/methodology/approach – Data were obtained using a mixed-method design. Quantitative data were collected using a quasi-experimental sequential cohort design with comparison group, in which 143 participants responded to a self-evaluation questionnaire up to six times over a three-year period. Semistructured interviews were also conducted with 24 managers. Findings – The results indicate that, as participants evolved through the leadership development program, self-reports of authentic leadership and mindfulness increased significantly and linearly as determined using repeated measures ANOVA, paired t-tests, and content analysis of interviews. Implications –The results suggest that a leadership development program based on action learning principles can foster the development of authentic leadership and mindfulness. The core elements of action learning (i.e., working on real problems, gaining new insights in a supportive and confrontational environment of one’s peer) appear to be key to bringing about real changes in the behavior of participating managers and maximizing the chances of generating lasting effects. Originality/value – This is the first longitudinal study to demonstrate that the development of mindfulness and authentic leadership – which calls for internalization of attitudes and behaviors – can be fostered by a leadership development program. The question of whether authentic leadership can be developed through planned interventions is paramount for advancing theory and research on authentic leadership. Keywords: authentic leadership; leadership development; mindfulness; action learning; trigger events
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Servant leadership is anchored in the human drive to bond with others and contribute to the betterment of the society. An emphasis on service motivation, as demonstrated by empowering and developing people with empathy and humility, differentiates servant leadership from other leadership frameworks. In this study, we analyzed the degree to which five aspects of servant leadership, Egalitarianism, Moral Integrity, Empowering, Empathy and Humility were endorsed as important for effective leadership across cultures. While each of these dimensions was found to be associated with effective leadership, there was considerable variation in degree of endorsement of components of servant leadership across different GLOBE culture clusters. The dimensions of Egalitarianism and Empowering were endorsed more strongly in Nordic/European cultures but less so in Asian and similar cultures. On the other hand, servant leadership dimensions of Empathy and Humility were more strongly endorsed in Asian cultures than European cultures. Further, significant relationships were found between several societal cultural values and aspects of servant leadership which help us understand why nations differ in endorsing this leadership construct.
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Editor's Note. Three years ago, I invited Robert (Bob) Gephart to write a "From the Editors" column designed to help authors improve their chances of success when submitting qualitative research to AMJ. Judging from the increasing number of quali- tative studies that have been accepted and pub- lished in AMJ since that time, I would like to think that his article, "Qualitative Research and the Academy of Management Journal," has had a pos- itive impact. Continuing in this tradition, I asked Roy Sud- daby—an excellent reviewer (and author) of quali- tative research—to tackle another "big issue" that the editorial team has noticed with respect to qual- itative submissions to AMJ: overly generic use of the term "grounded theory" and confusion regard- ing alternative epistemological approaches to qual- itative research. Like Bob before him, Roy has, I believe, produced an analysis that will greatly ben- efit those who are relatively new to qualitative re- search or who have not yet had much success in getting their qualitative research published. Hope- fully, Roy's analysis will help even more authors to succeed, thus allowing AMJ and other journals to continue to increase the quality of insights pro- vided by rich qualitative studies of individual, or- ganizational, and institutional phenomena. Sara L. Rynes
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Hello everyone. This is a text book and so I am unable to share it with you for copyright reasons. Apologies for this. Mark
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Recently researchers have introduced a new leadership construct, referred to as authentic leadership. There has been considerable interest in this new area of study. Scholars conducting work on authentic leadership believe that the recent upswing in corporate scandals and management malfeasance indicate that a new perspective on leadership is necessary. In order to address these negative societal trends, proponents of authentic leadership take a very normative approach, placing a strong emphasis on the creation of interventions to facilitate the development of authenticity. We concur with the basic tenets of this initiative. However, in this article, we note that it is premature to focus on designing interventions to develop authentic leaders before taking further steps in defining, measuring, and rigorously researching this construct. We draw attention to these issues with the hope of insuring that any development initiatives that are implemented are practical and effective for leaders and organizations.
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Based on research with 21 top executives, we have identified a measurable characteristic that highly effective leaders have in common: Leadership Development Level (or LDL). LDLs are developmental levels of matu- rity that shape the mental and moral capacities of the leader. While the highest LDLs are associated with authentic leadership, the theory behind LDL focuses on the leader's developmental understanding of his or her world, and how that understanding differs at each LDL. In this way, LDL describes the process by which leaders become authentic leaders. In this chapter, we explain what LDL is, how it works, and it's utility for un- derstanding leadership development and leader effectiveness.
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The past decade has seen a dramatic increase in scholarly interest in the topic of authentic leadership. We review this literature with the goal of clarifying the state of knowledge in the field. We begin with a historical overview of the construct's definition and evolution. Next, we present the results of a content analysis of 91 publications that focus on authentic leadership. Specifically, we examined the publication type (theoretical, empirical, and practitioner), contributors (e.g., discipline, nationality, and institutional affiliation), theoretical foundations, research strategies, sample location/type, data collection methods, analytical procedures, and nomological network of authentic leadership. We conclude by presenting an agenda for future research.
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A field study was conducted with 47 Army action teams spanning 9 weeks to assess the influence of team leader authenticity on team authenticity and team outcomes. Results showed that team leader authenticity at Time 1 predicted teamwork behavior and team productivity at Time 3, with these relationships mediated by team authenticity at Time 2. We further explored the moderating role of authenticity strength in the team authenticity–teamwork behavior relationship. Team authenticity interacted with authenticity strength such that the team authenticity–teamwork behavior relationship was stronger when authenticity strength was higher rather than lower. Implications of these findings for theories of shared leadership, team leadership, and authentic leadership are discussed.