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Abstract

Despite the growing maturity of Blockchain technology and an increasing deployment in Supply Chain and Logistics, many small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) struggle to use the technology for their benefit. Based on 27 expert interviews, we develop a typology of Blockchain adoption approaches for SMEs and discuss their implications. We find that SMEs can approach the technology as either an Observer, a Cooperator, or a Service Provider based on their technological expertise, the expected relevance of the technology for their organization, and their market power.

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