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Engagement is the Key: A New Journey for ADHD Treatment

Authors:
  • Grifo multimedia
  • Villa delle Ginestre srl
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Abstract

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders diagnosed in children, for which Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) represents the main standard treatment used worldwide, despite its pedantic approach negatively affects both patients’ engagement and improvement. In this work we aim to renovate ADHD treatment with a new approach for cognitive, behavioral, and emotional patient rehabilitation. Iamhero is a first prototype of hi-tech multisensorial therapeutic environment, that bases its strength on patients physical and emotional engagement, leading therefore to cognitive and behavioral skills improvement. The first results show encouraging improvement in learning skills in patients that have steadily used the system for six months. In this paper we explain Iamhero main features, and the first experimental results obtained.

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We propose a new approach—called PK-clustering—to help social scientists create meaningful clusters in social networks. Many clustering algorithms exist but most social scientists find them difficult to understand, and tools do not provide any guidance to choose algorithms, or to evaluate results taking into account the prior knowledge of the scientists. Our work introduces a new clustering approach and a visual analytics user interface that address this issue. It is based on a process that 1) captures the prior knowledge of the scientists as a set of incomplete clusters, 2) runs multiple clustering algorithms (similarly to clustering ensemble methods), 3) visualizes the results of all the algorithms ranked and summarized by how well each algorithm matches the prior knowledge, 4) evaluates the consensus between user-selected algorithms and 5) allows users to review details and iteratively update the acquired knowledge. We describe our approach using an initial functional prototype, then provide two examples of use and early feedback from social scientists. We believe our clustering approach offers a novel constructive method to iteratively build knowledge while avoiding being overly influenced by the results of often randomly selected black-box clustering algorithms.
Book
People relate to other people, not to simplified types or segments. This is the concept that underpins this book. Personas, a user centered design methodology, covers topics from interaction design within IT, through to issues surrounding product design, communication, and marketing. Project developers need to understand how users approach their products from the product’s infancy, and regardless of what the product might be. Developers should be able to describe the user of the product via vivid depictions, as if they – with their different attitudes, desires and habits – were already using the product. In doing so they can more clearly formulate how to turn the product's potential into reality. Based on 20 years’ experience in solving problems for businesses and 15 years of research, currently at the IT University of Copenhagen, Lene Nielsen is Denmark’s leading expert in the persona method. She has a PhD in personas and scenarios, and through her research and practical experiences has developed her own approach to the method – 10 Steps to Personas. This second edition of Personas – User Focused Design presents a step-by-step methodology of personas which will be of interest to developers of IT, communications solutions and innovative products. This book also includes three new chapters and considerable expansion on the material in the first edition.
Conference Paper
Here, we present the outcome of the 4 th workshop on Multisensory Approaches to Human-Food Interaction (MHFI), developed in collaboration with ICMI 2020 in Utrecht, The Netherlands. Capitalizing on the increasing interest on multisensory aspects of human-food interaction and the unique contribution that our community offers, we developed a space to discuss ideas ranging from mechanisms of multisensory food perception, through multisensory technologies, to new applications of systems in the context of MHFI. All in all, the workshop involved 11 contributions, which will hopefully further help shape the basis of a field of inquiry that grows as we see progress in our understanding of the senses and the development of new technologies in the context of food. CCS CONCEPTS • Human-centered computing, Human computer interaction (HCI), Interaction paradigms
Article
In human interaction, people will keep different distances from each other depending on their gender. For example, males will stand further away from males and closer to females. Previous studies in virtual reality (VR), where people were interacting with virtual humans, showed a similar result. However, many other variables influence proximity, such as appearance characteristics of the virtual character (e.g., attractiveness). Our study focuses on proximity to virtual walkers, where gender could be recognised from motion only, since previous studies using point-light displays found walking motion is rich in gender cues. In our experiment, a walking wooden mannequin approached the participant embodied in a virtual avatar using the HTC Vive Pro HMD and controllers. The mannequin animation was motion captured from several male and female actors and each motion was displayed individually on the character. Participants used the controller to stop the approaching mannequin when they felt it was uncomfortably close to them. Based on previous work, we hypothesised that proximity will be affected by the gender of the character, but unlike previous research, the gender in our experiment could only be determined from character’s motion. We also expected differences in proximity according to the gender of the participant. We additionally expected some motions to be rated more attractive than others and that attractive motions would reduce the proximity measure. Our results show support for the last two assumptions, but no difference in proximity was found according to the gender of the character’s motion. Our findings have implications for the design of virtual characters in interactive virtual environments.
Article
Advertisements in social media can be tailored to psychographic profiles based on consumers' digital-trace data. An experiment (N = 936) investigated the conditions under which such trait-based personalization of social media messages is more effective than non-personalized messages and which personality traits and user characteristics are most suitable for this purpose. In a 9 × 2 between-subjects design, the persuasive appeal of a Facebook ad and the advertised product (phone vs. soda) were varied. Participants' ‘Big Five’ personality traits, need for cognition, and susceptibility to persuasive strategies were assessed in a questionnaire. Results showed limited effects of personality matching. Matched messages led to increased intentions to engage with the post when they addressed specific persuasive susceptibilities (particularly toward authority influence). However, there were no consistent effects on consumers' attitudes toward the advertised products. Findings are discussed regarding the ongoing debate on microtargeting in social media.