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Young Learners Teaching Strategies (Keynote)

Authors:
Young Learners Teaching Strategies
Keynote Speech at
Excellence in Teaching English to Young Learners
Organized by the Ministry of Education, Saudi Arabia
22-Aug-2021
Ali H. Al-Hoorie
www.ali-alhoorie.com
Why do you have an imaginary bubble?"
Cameron asked. Billie happily told her
new friends about her bubble. “Each
morning when I leave my house I step
into my bubble. It keeps me clean, safe,
and germ-free during the day. When I go
home, I step out of my bubble and wash
my hands.”
If someone gets to close to your
imaginary bubble, it will pop.
Teaching Strategies:
1. Implicit Teaching
(Moon, 2005)
Picture: A man is sleeping. Two men are trying to steal his drum.
Abstract concepts are hard for young learners
Subject, verb, subjectverb agreement
Adjective, adverb, preposition
Singular, plural nouns
Regular, irregular verbs
How to correct language?
Recasts: repeating the sentence but in correct form
Student: “I want see”
Teacher: “You want to see?”
Recasts with authentic extensions
Student: “I want see”
Teacher: “What do you want to see?”
Correction after the conversation is over.
Teacher: “Now do we say: I want see or I want to see?”
Not very effective for old learners:
Better explicit teaching
Except to correct pronunciation
Teaching Strategies:
1. Implicit Teaching
2. Repetition
Rain, rain, go away!
All the children want to play.
Rain, rain, go away!
Come again another day
Rhymes
Twinkle, twinkle, little star
How I wonder what you are
Up above the world so high
Like a diamond in the sky
Twinkle, twinkle, little star
How I wonder what you are.
Dynamic Rhymes
One little finger, one little finger, one little finger.
Tap tap tap.
Point your finger up.
Point your finger down.
Put it on your head. Head!
One little finger, one little finger, one little finger.
Tap tap tap.
Point your finger up.
Point your finger down.
Put it on your nose. Nose!
What is unique?
Not mechanical
Meaningful language
Physical
Fun
Learn by observation
Good for shy students
Teaching Strategies:
1. Implicit Teaching
2. Repetition
3. Authenticity
(Moon, 2005)
Teacher A’s beliefs about teaching:
Student language needs to be controlled and error-free.
The teacher is the main source of language input.
Students may not be able to work together independently from the teacher.
Students need to be formally taught a language element before they can use it.
Teacher B’s beliefs about teaching:
Students need different activities.
Students need enjoyable activities.
Students can practice independently from the teacher.
Students should use the language more freely for communication.
Teaching Strategies:
1. Implicit Teaching
2. Repetition
3. Authenticity
4. Chunking
Group of words
I don’t know.
What is wrong?
Are you ready?
Recombining chunks
I don’t know him.
I don’t know his name.
We don’t know them.
We don’t know what is wrong.
Teaching Strategies:
1. Implicit Teaching
2. Repetition
3. Authenticity
4. Chunking
5. Feedback
Bad feedback:
You are smart!
You are talented!
You are lucky!
Good Boy! Good Girl!
Good feedback:
You worked hard!
Your [strategy] was good!
Good job!
Well-done!
After Success
Bad feedback:
Don’t worry, not everyone is good at languages.
You worked hard.
Good feedback:
Let’s think why [strategy] didn’t work.
You didn’t work hard enough.
What can we learn from this experience?
You are not there yet.
After Failure
A lot of parents or teachers say praise the effort, not the outcome. I say
[that’s] wrong: Praise the effort that led to the outcome or learning
progress; tie the praise to it. It’s not just effort, but strategy… so support
the student in finding another strategy. Effective teachers who actually
have classrooms full of children with a growth mindset are always
supporting children’s learning strategies and showing how strategies
created that success.
Carol Dweck
Recommended Reading:
Moon, J. (2005). Children learning English: A guidebook for English
language teachers (2nd ed.). Macmillan.
Thank you for listening
@Ali_AlHoorie
hoorie_a@jic.edu.sa
www.ali-alhoorie.com
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
Children learning English: A guidebook for English language teachers
  • J Moon
Moon, J. (2005). Children learning English: A guidebook for English language teachers (2 nd ed.). Macmillan.