BookPDF Available

Peces marinos del norte de Chile: guía para la identificación y mantención en cautiverio. Vol. I. Fundación Reino Animal & ONG por la conservación de la vida salvaje. Arica, Chile. 1-79 pp.

Authors:
  • Fundación Reino Animal
A preview of the PDF is not available
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
Article
Full-text available
We report the observation of two juvenile specimens of Sashed Catfish, Galeichthys peruvianus Lütken, 1874, south of Arica, Chile, which expands the current known distributional range of the species, by adding a previously unrecorded locality. The importance of the presence of breeding populations in the northern coast of Chile is discussed.
Article
Full-text available
Glena mielkei Vargas, 2010 (Lepidoptera: Geometridae: Ennominae: Boarmiini) is a Neotropical geometrid moth native to the Atacama Desert of northern Chile whose larvae are folivorous on the shrub Trixis cacalioides (Asteraecae). The last instar and pupa are described and illustrated, and DNA barcode sequences are provided for the first time for G. mielkei. Descriptions are made based on larvae collected in the type locality. Comparisons with the available descriptions of congeneric species suggest that the chaetotaxy of the SV group of the abdominal segment and the morphology of the cremaster could be useful tools to species identification based on last instar and pupa, respectively. A search in BOLD (Barcode of Life Data System) showed that the only DNA barcode haplotype found in the two specimens sequenced was closest to Physocleora Warren, 1897 than Glena Hulst, 1896. These results coincide with the morphological peculiarities of the genitalia highlighted in the original description of G. mielkei, suggesting that a definitive assessment of the generic status of this geometrid moth deserves further integrative studies.
Article
Full-text available
The Desventuradas Islands (San Félix and San Ambrosio) and Juan Fernández Archipelago (Robinson Crusoe and Alejandro Selkirk) are oceanic islands of volcanic origin located in the southeastern Pacific off Chile. Based on new material collected since 1997, revision of the R/V Anton Bruun expeditions collections, and a taxonomic update, the coastal fish fauna of Juan Fernández Archipelago and Desventuradas Islands found a total of 52 species, with 41 and 43 species, respectively. The number of coastal fish species recorded herein as endemic for Juan Fernández is only five (12,2%) and three species are new records (Gymnothorax cf. obesus, Gnathophis sp., Suezichthys sp). The Desventuradas Islands have only two endemic species (4,6%) and four species are new records (Scorpaenodes englerti, Maxillicosta reticulata, Suezichthys sp., Aseraggodes bahamondei). The reduced number of endemic species for the Juan Fernández Islands as compared with previous accounts (15 species) is the result that more species were found to be endemic to both islands groups (22 species = 42,3% all coastal fishes), suggesting these two island groups should be considered a single biogeographic unit. The eastern extension of the Indo West Pacific Region to include the Nazca Ridge, Desventuradas and Juan Fernández Islands is supported herein. The zoogeographical affinities between Desventuradas and western Pacific Islands (Easter Island to Australia), includes 16 species, adding five new species to previous lists. Relationships of three genera indicate a Western Pacific origin with one or more dispersal events to the Desventuradas and Juan Fernández Islands. Another seven genera, with relatively few species and restricted distribution, may have this same pattern. Only one phylogenetic study indicates a continental origin with a westward dispersal (Odontesthes), however another three genera may have this same pattern of dispersal.
Article
Full-text available
Se menciona el hallazgo de una hembra de Galeichthys peruvianus Lütken, 1874 con trece huevos en su interior en Taltal, Provincia de Antofagasta, Chile.
Book
Full-text available
Todo sobre como armar y mantener su acuario marino con especies nativas de la costa chilena.
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this study was to report the colouration patterns of live specimens of two Blenniidae species: Scartichthys gigas and S. viridis, from tide pools in the coastal area of 3 localities of northern Chile. Colouration patterns for S. gigas were: the two-bar front head covered/uncovered and the uniform orange-brown, found in specimens associated to kelps, for juveniles; an intermediate juvenile-adult reticulated bar-stained pattern described for the first time and the reticulated pattern for adults. For S. viridis the dark-light green pattern is described for juveniles and adults. The findings are discussed in terms of colouration patterns previously described for both species, with emphasis on the importance of using colouration patterns to improve species identification, reduce habitat disturbance and specimen removal from the wild.
Article
Full-text available
This study analyzed the diet and parasites of an insular blenniid fish, Scartichthys variolatus, and then compared that with data published for two congeneric species from the South American Pacific coast, S. viridis and S. gigas. Fifty-two specimens of fish were collected during 2008 and 2009 from the intertidal zone of the Robinson Crusoe Island, about 700 km off the coast of central Chile. The most frequent food items in all the fish analyzed were algae. Just two specimens of S. variolatus (3.8%) were parasitized only by the nematode Pseudodelphis chilensis. Despite the fact that all Scartichthys spp. are herbivorous, and the diet was composed of similar species, there were differences in frequencies of some of the algae, maily in Chaetomorpha sp. and Polysiphonia sp. The low parasite species richness of S. variolatus contrasts with that of the continental congeneric species, S. viridis with 13 parasite species, and S. gigas with 13 species. Therefore, the diet of these fishes can not explain differences in their parasite composition, so it is possible that environmental conditions, and the distance between the location of Robinson Crusoe Island and the South American coast, had limited dispersal and distribution of hosts and parasites over time.
Article
Scartichthys viridis maintains a herbivorous diet following recruitment to rocky intertidal areas, where it consumes almost exclusively macroalgae. The sheet–like green macroalgae Ulva and Enteromorpha were the main items consumed by individuals <130 mm LT. The tough branching red macroalga Gelidium made the bulk of the gut contents of specimens >220 mm LT, Ulva being consumed to a much lesser extent. Further, Gelidium increased in importance in the total gut contents during ontogeny. In contrast, both small (70–120 mm LT) and medium–sized (140–210 mm LT) S. viridis individuals preferred Ulva in the laboratory. It is suggested that the increasing consumption of Gelidium along the ontogeny of S. viridis results from the limited availability of Ulva in the field. Large S. viridis individuals possessed longer guts relative to their body length, in comparison with small individuals.