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Phase congruence implementation in ImageJ using Radix-2 FFT

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... This section presents the results attained by varying the phase congruency parameters, as suggested in the previous one. The original Kovesi code can be used to evaluate phase congruency in images [10], as well as an open source application, written by the authors in Java, as an Imagej plug-in [26], which includes further enhancements for noise estimation [13], different PC quantization functions [27] and the use of tile mirror in conjunction with Radix-2 FFT to obtain more accurate edges at the edges of images when at least one side of the image is not a power of two [28,29]. Figures 7-9 show the results obtained by applying phase congruency on the sample images, shown in Figures 7a, 8a and 9a changing the quantization functions to highlight that the modification of the global parameters can be tuned for the same purpose, independent of the quantization function shape. ...
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A note on the phase congruence method in image analysis
  • C A Jacanamejoy
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Jacanamejoy, C. A. and Forero, M. G., "A note on the phase congruence method in image analysis," in [Iberoamerican Congress on Pattern Recognition ], 384-391, Springer (2018).
Split radix'fft algorithm
  • P Duhamel
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Study of the phase congruency properties for edge detection in images
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Forero, M., Jacanamejoy, C., and Rivera, S., "Study of the phase congruency properties for edge detection in images," in [Applications of Digital Image Processing XLIV], Tescher, A. G. and Ebrahimi, T., eds., Proc. SPIE 11842, In-press (2021).
Phase congruency with monogenic filters
  • C A Jacanamejoy
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Jacanamejoy, C. A. and Forero, M. G., "Phase congruency with monogenic filters." Available at https: // www. researchgate. net/ publication/ 337915149_ Phase_ Congruencyzip (2018).