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Does Smart equal Sustainable? Coupling, Decoupling, and the Sustainability Performance in Cities

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... The conception of the Smart City as an ecosystem of new innovation opportunities for large and small regional companies, pointed out by Hollands (2008), is still valid (Lee et al., 2014), regardless of whether it is understood that a Smart City has other purposes beyond the economic development of the city. In this sense, Friedrich et al. (2021) describe a Smart City as a hybrid organization composed of competing institutional logics: the market logic versus the social welfare logic. In this sense thanks to the so-called smart computing technologies, an innovation habitat is generated (Entrepreneurship for Sustainable Development, 2018), enabling the exploration and exploitation of new opportunities and business models not exclusive limited to ICT sector Barba-Sánchez et al., 2019). ...
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