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Extraterrestrial Intelligence, edited by Jensine Andresen and Octavio A. Chon Torres, Newcastle upon Tyne, U.K.: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

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DISCOUNT CODE: PROMO25 (for purchase of hard copy book at Cambridge Scholars Publishing website; https://www.cambridgescholars.com/product/978-1-5275-7727-5) EBOOK: https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Jensine_Andresen_Extraterrestrial_Intelligence?id=SXVjEAAAQBAJ DESCRIPTION OF BOOK: https://www.cambridgescholars.com/uploads/sbpub_sub/resources/Extraterrestrial-Intelligence-Academic-and-Societal-Implications.pdf What are the implications for human society, and for our institutions of higher learning, of the discovery of a sophisticated extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI) operating on and around Earth? This book explores this timely question from a multidisciplinary perspective. It considers scientific, philosophical, theological, and interdisciplinary ways of thinking about the question, and it represents all viewpoints on how likely it is that an ETI is already operating here on Earth. The book’s contributors represent a wide range of academic disciplines in their formal training and later vocations, and, upon reflection on the book’s topic, they articulate a diverse range of insights into how ETI will impact humankind. It is safe to say that any contact or communication with ETI will not merely be a game changer for human society, but will also be a paradigm changer. This means that it makes sense for human beings to prepare themselves now for this important transition.
Extraterrestrial
Intelligence
Extraterrestrial
Intelligence:
Academic and Societal
Implications
Edited by
Jensine Andresen
and Octavio A. Chon-Torres
Extraterrestrial Intelligence: Academic and Societal Implications
Edited by Jensine Andresen and Octavio A. Chon-Torres
This book first published 2022
Cambridge Scholars Publishing
Lady Stephenson Library, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE6 2PA, UK
British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data
A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library
Copyright © 2022 by Jensine Andresen, Octavio A. Chon-Torres
and contributors
All rights for this book reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced,
stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means,
electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without
the prior permission of the copyright owner.
ISBN (10): 1-5275-7727-9
ISBN (13): 978-1-5275-7727-5
CONTENTS
Contributors ............................................................................................. viii
Part I: Philosophical and Scientific Perspectives
Chapter One ................................................................................................ 2
Cartographies of Knowledge and Academic Maps
Jensine Andresen, Ph.D., Independent Scholar, Science, Philosophy,
and Religion
Chapter Two ............................................................................................... 7
Communicating with An Extraterrestrial Intelligence (ETI)
Eamonn Ansbro, Ph.D., Director and Research Astronomer,
Kingsland Observatory, Ireland
Chapter Three ........................................................................................... 21
Why Are We So Lonely?
Chris Impey, Ph.D., University Distinguished Professor,
Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona
Chapter Four ............................................................................................. 33
Unidentified Aerial Phenomena (UAP): An Opportunity to Talk
About Science
Octavio A. Chon Torres, Ph.D., Professor, Philosophy,
University of Lima, Peru
Chapter Five ............................................................................................. 41
A Fresh Approach to the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI)
Abraham (“Avi”) Loeb, Ph.D., Professor, Astronomy, Harvard University
Contents
vi
Chapter Six ............................................................................................... 87
Scientific and Technology Exploration of Unidentified Aerial Phenomena
(UAP)
Hakan Kayal, Prof. Dr., Professur für Raumfahrttechnik Informatik
(Space Technology Informatics) VIII, Julius-Maximilians-Universität
Würzburg, Germany
Chapter Seven ......................................................................................... 112
Are Unidentified Aerial Phenomena (UAP) Produced by Advanced
Extraterrestrial Intelligences (ETIs)? A View of the Future of Humanity
as A Model for the Emergence of Extraterrestrial Intelligences
Daniel Gross, Ph.D., Independent Scholar, Physics
Chapter Eight .......................................................................................... 124
The Impact of Physical Sciences on the Study of Unidentified Aerial
Phenomena (UAP)
Massimo Teodorani, Ph.D., Independent Scholar, Astrophysics
Chapter Nine ........................................................................................... 142
The Religious and Spiritual Impact of Meeting an Extraterrestrial
Civilization
Dr. Andrew Newberg, Professor, Department of Integrative Medicine
and Nutritional Sciences; Professor, Department of Radiology;
and Research Director, Marcus Institute of Integrative Health,
Thomas Jefferson University and Hospital
Part II: Social Science and Interdisciplinary Perspectives
Chapter Ten ............................................................................................ 150
Unidentified Aerial Phenomena (UAP) and the Search for Knowledge
Michael J. Reiss, Ph.D., Professor of Science Education, University
College London Institute of Education
Chapter Eleven ....................................................................................... 165
Philosophical Discussions of Unidentified Aerial Phenomena (UAP)
Octavio A. Chon Torres, Ph.D., Professor, Philosophy, University
of Lima, Peru
Extraterrestrial Intelligence: Academic and Societal Implications vii
Chapter Twelve ...................................................................................... 173
Evolutionary Biology as a Source of Reliable Knowledge about
Extraterrestrial Intelligence (ETI): Why We Should Reject Militarism
in Our Thinking About ETI
Konrad Szocik, Assistant Professor, Department of Social Sciences,
University of Information Technology and Management, Rzeszow, Poland
Chapter Thirteen ..................................................................................... 187
Will Extraterrestrial Consciousness Remap the Terrestrial Mind?
Ted Peters, Ph.D., Distinguished Research Professor of Systematic
Theology and Ethics, Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary
Chapter Fourteen .................................................................................... 218
Attitude of the Human Self in Encounter with the Other
Glen Messer, Th.D., Independent Scholar, History and Theology
Chapter Fifteen ....................................................................................... 229
The Appeal of Ambiguity
Ronald Y. Nakasone, Ph.D., Professor of Buddhist Studies,
Graduate Theological Union
Chapter Sixteen ...................................................................................... 239
The Time Model of Contact and Eastern Authenticity Testing
Olena Kalantarova, Ph.D. candidate, Philosophy Institute,
Ukrainian Academy of Sciences
Chapter Seventeen .................................................................................. 263
Relativity and Quantum Theory: The Manifestation of Unidentified
Aerial Phenomena (UAP) and a New Order for Physics
Carl Peterson, Ph.D., Independent Scholar, Theoretical Physics and Chemistry
Chapter Eighteen .................................................................................... 281
Mind of the Matter, Matter of the Mind
Jensine Andresen, Ph.D., Independent Scholar, Science, Philosophy,
and Religion
CONTRIBUTORS
Jensine Andresen
Jensine Andresen (Ph.D. Harvard University) holds a B.S.E. in Civil
Engineering from Princeton University, where she also earned a Certificate
from the School of Public and International Affairs. She completed an M.A.
degree at Columbia University in Social Anthropology with a focus on
China. She also earned her A.M. (master’s) and Ph.D. at Harvard University
from the Committee on the Study of Religion with a focus on Indo-Tibetan
Buddhism. Dr. Andresen is completing The Kālacakra Tantra: The Initiation
Chapter with the Vimalaprabhā Commentary (forthcoming), a translation
of a well-known Sanskrit text with annotations from Tibetan.
Dr. Andresen served as a Visiting Assistant Professor at the University of
Vermont, where she taught Science and Religion and world religions. She
also was an Assistant Professor at Boston University in the interdisciplinary
doctoral program on Science, Philosophy, and Religion. Dr. Andresen also
held two academic appointments as a Visiting Scholar at Columbia
University, where she later was appointed as an Officer of Research,
Associate Research Scholar.
Dr. Andresen edited Religion in Mind: Cognitive Perspectives on Religious
Belief, Ritual, and Experience (Cambridge University Press, 2001) and she
is a co-editor of Cognitive Models and Spiritual Maps: Interdisciplinary
Explorations of Religious Experience (Imprint Academic, 2000). Dr.
Andresen’s recent chapter, “Two Elephants in the Room of Astrobiology,”
published in Astrobiology: Science, Ethics, and Public Policy
(Wiley/Scrivener, 2021), examines Unidentified Aerial Phenomena (UAP)
in the context of the militarization and weaponization of space, which she
opposes. Dr. Andresen also is completing two single-authored monographs,
Extraterrestrial Ethics (Ethics International Press, forthcoming), and
Extraterrestrial Mind (in preparation).
Dr. Andresen has published multiple entries in Encyclopedia of Science and
Religion (Macmillan, 2003), a chapter in Fifty Years in Science and
Religion: Ian G. Barbour and his Legacy (Ashgate, 2004), and articles in
many peer-reviewed journals and other publications, including The
International Journal for the Psychology of Religion, Harvard Theological
Extraterrestrial Intelligence: Academic and Societal Implications
ix
Review, Dreaming, The American Society of International Law,
Proceedings of the 96th Annual Meeting, March 13-16, 2002, Washington,
DC: The Legalization of International Relations/The Internationalize of
Legal Relations, Journal of Cultural Diversity, Journal of Sleep Research,
The Journal of Religion, Zygon: Journal of Religion and Science, Religion
and Education, Isis (Supplement, Catching up with the Vision: Essays on
the Occasion of the 75th Anniversary of the Founding of the History of
Society Society), and Boston University’s Focus. Dr. Andresen is one of the
co-authors of Report on Ecumenical Faith and Genetics Working Group,
which was written as part of work with the Episcopal Diocese of
Massachusetts Faith and Genetics Working Group. She also created a six-
part videotape series, Bioethics and Society: Scientific, Ethical, Legal, and
Religious Perspectives on Genetic Technologies.
In addition to her work in academia, Dr. Andresen has held various positions
in finance, business, and government.
Eamonn Ansbro
Eamonn Ansbro (Ph.D., Open University, U.K.) is Director and Research
Astronomer, Kingsland Observatory, in Ireland. Dr. Ansbro originally was
a meteorological observer with the Ministry of Defense in the United
Kingdom (U.K.). He later obtained his master’s degree with Distinction in
Astronomy from University of Western Sydney, Australia. Dr. Ansbro also
holds a M.A. in Astronomy and a Ph.D. in Astronomy from the Planetary
and Space Sciences Research Institute at Open University in the U.K. There,
he carried out a ten-year survey of the outer solar system.
Dr. Ansbro is an elected Fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society and is
the National Coordinator for Ireland in Astronomy Education for the
International Astronomical Union. He is a member of the U.K. SETI
[Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence] Research Network, the European
Astrobiology Network Association, and the Society of Photo Instrument
Engineers. Dr. Ansbro also is an European Union COST [European
Cooperation in Science & Technology] Action member for polarimetry
studies in the solar system.
Dr. Ansbro currently is Director of Kingsland Observatory in Ireland and
Observatorio de las Animas in Spain. At the former, he is involved in
operating multisensor platforms to detect UAP, and he collaborates with
Space Exploration Limited on new, experimental quantum communication
methods to communicate with the extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI) behind
Contributors
x
UAP. Dr. Ansbro also operates a suite of robotic observatories in Spain that
provide remote access to a wide range of optical telescopes and instruments
for multiwavelength observations in astrophysics and astronomy. He
encourages schools and universities at all levels up to the doctoral level to
avail themselves of both of these facilities.
Octavio A. Chon Torres
Octavio A. Chon Torres (Ph.D., Universidad Nacional Mayor de San
Marcos) holds a Doctorate in Philosophy and is Doctorate Candidate in
Education and University Teaching at the Universidad Nacional Mayor de
San Marcos. He also holds a master's degree in Epistemology and a graduate
degree in Philosophy from the same university. He currently is a professor
at the Universidad de Lima. His field of study focuses on the philosophy of
astrobiology, astrobioethics, and transdisciplinarity, and he is the lead editor
of Astrobiology: Science, Ethics, and Public Policy (Wiley/Scrivener, 2021).
Prof. Chon Torres is the president of the Asociación Peruana de Astrobiología
(Peruvian Association of Astrobiology) (ASPAST), for which he carries out
research and scientific dissemination activities. He also is the Director and
Founder of the Stratosphere Project, a transdisciplinary research initiative
in astrobiology. He has been a member of the advisory board for the White
Paper Astrobiology and Society in Europe Today (Springer, 2018). Dr. Chon
Torres also is a member of the Working Group on Astrobioethics and of the
Astrobiology F3 Commission of the International Astronomical Union.
Further, he has organized the IV International Congress of Astrobiology
(2018), the first event of its nature held in Peru.
Daniel Gross
Daniel M. Gross (Ph.D., Technical University of Munich), now an
independent scholar, graduated from ETH Zürich, Switzerland, in
experimental solid-state physics. He received his Ph.D. on the production
of high-density, high-temperature plasmas from the Technical University of
Munich with a research grant at the Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics
for nuclear fusion research.
Dr. Gross then began working at Battelle Geneva Research Centre, first, for
a few years, on a phase transition system for infrared viewing; during the
next twenty years, he led and oversaw a wide range of applied physics
projects in the fields of optoelectronics, microtechnology, and artificial
intelligence, most of them supported by large industrial groups in Europe
and elsewhere. This work led to over 20 patent applications/patents.
Extraterrestrial Intelligence: Academic and Societal Implications
xi
Dr. Gross later became Research Director at Valeo, a global automotive
supplier headquartered in Paris, where he evaluated and restructured major
parts of their research and development (R&D) activities. Back in
Switzerland, he took up a position in a newly formed R&D team of the
Swatch Group aimed at developing the ultra-compact two-seater “Smart”
car. He subsequently established himself in Neuchatel, Switzerland, as an
independent R&D consultant, proposing projects partly based on patent
applications of his own.
Over the past fifteen years, Dr. Gross has studied reports of Unidentified
Aerial Phenomena (UAP) observed all over the world. In 2013, he wrote a
journal article that offers a causal explanation for these enigmatic
phenomena, “Unidentified Aerial Phenomena (UAP): A New Hypothesis
toward Their Explanation,” Journal of Scientific Exploration 27, no.3: 415-
53. As a young researcher, his interest for what was scientifically known
but technically yet to be unexploited led him to become a physicist,
inventor, and industrial research manager. Now, he is attracted by scientific
border fields where the line between knowledge and belief is blurred.
Chris Impey
Chris Impey (Ph.D., University of Edinburgh) is a University Distinguished
Professor at the University of Arizona. For seventeen years he was Deputy
Head of the Astronomy Department, and for four years he was Associate
Dean of the College of Science. He has 220 refereed publications and eighty
conference proceedings in astronomy, and one hundred publications on
educational topics. His work has been supported by $20 million in grants
from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the
National Science Foundation (NSF). As a professor, he has won eleven
teaching awards. He has mentored thirty graduate students and 240
undergraduates. Prof. Impey is a past Vice President of the American
Astronomical Society. He has also been an NSF Distinguished Teaching
Scholar, a Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar, and Carnegie Council on
Teaching’s Arizona Professor of the Year. He was a co-chair of the
Education and Public Outreach Study Group for the 2010 Decadal Survey
of the National Academy of Sciences. In 2009, he was elected Fellow of the
American Association for the Advancement of Science, and in 2014 he was
the first astronomer named a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professor.
Prof. Impey aims to convey the excitement of astronomy in as many ways
as possible to a large public audience. He gives twenty public talks a year,
to audiences as large as 5000 and as varied as NASA engineers, first graders,
Contributors
xii
and judges of the Ninth Circuit Court. For a decade, he has traveled to India
to teach Buddhist monks in a program started by the Dalai Lama. He
designed and led four tours for donors and alumni exploring landmarks of
science and culture: “Visiting Galileo’s Italy;” “Exploring Chile: Earth and
Sky;” “Britain in a Golden Age of Science;” and “Origins of Humankind
and Astronomy.” He has written over forty popular articles on cosmology
and astrobiology and co-authored two introductory textbooks.
Prof. Impey’s “Teach Astronomy” web site has had over two million unique
visitors, and his YouTube lectures and videos have over three million views.
He has surveyed over 22,000 college students and members of the public on
their science literacy and attitudes towards science. Over 310,000 adults
from 165 countries have enrolled in his four Massive Open Online Classes
(MOOCs), watching over three million minutes of video lectures since
2013.
In addition to editing eleven books, Prof. Impey has authored nine trade
science books: The Living Cosmos (Random House, 2007), How It Ends
(W.W. Norton, 2010), How It Began (W.W. Norton, 2012), Talking About
Life (Cambridge, 2010), Dreams of Other Worlds (Princeton, 2013),
Humble Before the Void (Templeton, 2014), Beyond (W.W. Norton, 2015),
Einstein’s Monsters (W.W. Norton, 2018), and the upcoming Worlds
Without End (MIT, 2022). He has written one novel, Shadow World (Dark
Skies Press, 2013).
Olena Kalantarova
Olena Kalantarova (Ph.D. candidate, H.Skovoroda Institute of Philosophy)
is Researcher adjunct at the Philosophy Institute, Ukrainian Academy of
Sciences (Kyiv), where she is majoring in the history of philosophy and
Buddhist Studies. She holds a master’s degree in Applied Mathematics from
Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Ukraine, where she did
specific research on the pattern recognition problems in diagnostic methods
of medical cybernetics. She is the founder and leader of the research and
education non-governmental project called the Buddhological Laboratory
of Ukraine (BUDLAB); a member of the Association for the Study of
Esotericism and Mysticism, Russia (ASEM), and international and non-
government organization; and a member of the Workshop for the Academic
Study of Religions, Ukraine (WASR), a public organization. Ms. Kalantarova
has publications in academic journals Наукма: Наукові Записки (2016-
2019), Мультиверсум (2019), Філософська Думка (2021), and Східний
Світ (2021). She graduated at The Highest School of Philosophy under
Extraterrestrial Intelligence: Academic and Societal Implications
xiii
H.Skovoroda Institute of Philosophy (National Academy of Sciences)
Ukraine, Kyiv (2018-2019). She also was educated on the history of
philosophy by the Ph.D.-internships program at H.Skovoroda Institute of
Philosophy, Ukraine, where her specific research was on Tibetan Buddhism,
Sanskrit, and Classical Tibetan. There, she completed thesis research on The
Concept of Time in Buddhist Philosophy by the Example of the Traditions
of Kālacakra (2017-2021). Ms. Kalantarova also graduated from
Современная философия сознания” (“The Course on Modern Philosophy
of Mind”) at M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia (2021),
and she participated in a two-year educational program in psychology from
Moscow Gestalt Institute, Russia. She also conducted educational and
training programs on mathematics and computer science in the Kadamzhai
High School No. 17 in Kyrgyzstan.
In addition to her academic work, Ms. Kalantarova conducted independent
comparative studies on the ancient sciences of Eastern Europe and Central
and Southeast Asia (in particular, Hellenic, Indian, Persian, and Tibetan
astrology and Indian and Tibetan yoga). For the last ten years, she has
organized expeditions to India, Nepal, and Tibet and conducted field
research in Religious Studies on the traditions of the Shaivas, Naths, Bon,
and Tibetan Buddhists. She also has participated in the Spiritual Festival
Kumbha Mela in Allahabad, India (2013) and in the teachings of the Tenzin
Gyatso, the Fourteenth Dalai Lama, in Leh, India (2014) and Riga, Latvia
(2016 and 2018).
Ms. Kalantarova is the author of webinars, full-time seminars, interactive
seminars, and training programs aimed at improving the skills of students
in the field of Tibetan history, philosophy, and psychology. She specifically
focuses on the theory and practice of Buddhist Science, which includes the
history of the Tibetan tradition of natural philosophy, cosmology, the
science of stars, and the metaphysics of time. She has more than twenty
years of experience in interdisciplinary studies of astronomical-astrological
traditions within the framework of the comparative method of science.
Contributors
xiv
Hakan Kayal
Hakan Kayal (Dr.-Ing., Technical University of Berlin) is a Professor for
Space Technologies and the Chair, Informatics VIII, at the Julius-
Maximilians-University Würzburg (JMU), Germany. His main research
areas are in the design, construction, and operation of space systems,
especially in the area of higher spacecraft autonomy and small satellites for
exploration. He also is active in the search for extraterrestrial intelligences
(SETI) and conducts research on Unidentified Aerial phenomena (UAP).
After his study of aeronautics and astronautics at the Technical University
of Berlin (TUB), Prof. Kayal conducted his first experiment with the
operation of spacecraft at the satellite control center of the Turkish
geostationary commercial communications satellite TÜRKSAT 1B in
Ankara, Turkey. He then contributed to the international success of the Bi-
Spectral Infra-red (BIRD) satellite, which is the first developed satellite of
the German Aerospace Center (DLR) launched in 2001. Prof. Kayal was
involved in many aspects of the development of the BIRD satellite, was
responsible for operations within the developer team, and, later, was the
deputy project leader. BIRD demonstrated new infrared sensor technologies
in detection and observation of high temperature events such as forest fires
onboard of a small satellite.
At TUB, Prof. Kayal was then the project leader of TUB’s first pico satellite
until 2008. It was launched in 2009 to demonstrate miniaturized reaction
wheel technologies in the field of attitude determination and control. After
that, he became a professor at JMU where he was responsible for the first
nanosatellite, a 3U-Cubesat, which was developed and operated in low
Earth orbit (LEO) in 2019. The successor, a 6U-Cubesat, is currently under
development. The main objective is to demonstrate the autonomous on-
board training and use of miniaturized artificial intelligence technologies in
space for detection, classification, and observation of features on Earth. One
of the secondary objectives is the detection and recording of transient
luminous events such as meteors or lightning. Prof. Kayal also passes on his
extensive experience in space technology to employees of relevant
authorities, companies, and others in the form of annual courses. He has
contributed to research on UAP for several years by developing and
operating earthbound intelligent sensor systems, including a detection
system in Hessdalen, Norway. His students also take part in this research.
Prof. Kayal also has given seminars and interviews in Germany about UAP.
He has been operating a telescope for the detection of bright Transient Lunar
Phenomena (TLP) on the Moon since 2018 using algorithms and software
developed by his team.
Extraterrestrial Intelligence: Academic and Societal Implications
xv
Abraham (“Avi”) Loeb
Abraham (“Avi”) Loeb (Ph.D., Hebrew University of Jerusalem) is the
Frank B. Baird Jr. Professor of Science in the Department of Astronomy at
Harvard University and holds the Sackler Senior Professorship by Special
Appointment at Tel Aviv University. He is an elected fellow of the
American Academy of Arts & Sciences, the American Physical Society, and
the International Academy of Astronautics and former Chair of the Board
on Physics and Astronomy of the National Academies. Prof. Loeb also is a
former member of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and
Technology (PCAST) at the White House.
At Harvard, Prof. Loeb serves on the President’s Task Force of Diversity
and Belonging, the Faculty of Arts and Sciences Dean’s Faculty Resources
Committee, and the Provost’s Allston Academic Planning Committee. Prof.
Loeb also is founding director of Harvard University's Black Hole Initiative,
Director of the Institute for Theory and Computation (ITC) at the Harvard-
Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, and the longest-serving chair of the
Astronomy Department at Harvard University (2011-2020). Prof. Loeb
chairs the Advisory Committee for the Breakthrough Starshot Initiative and
serves as the Science Theory Director for all Initiatives of the Breakthrough
Prize Foundation.
Prof. Loeb has published six books and over 850 papers with h-index above
116. He is the bestselling author of Extraterrestrial: The First Sign of
Intelligent Life Beyond Earth (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2021) and co-
author of Life in the Cosmos: From Biosignatures to Technosignatures
(Harvard University Press, 2021). Previously, he wrote First Light in the
Universe, Saas-Fee Advanced Course 36, for the Swiss Society for
Astrophysics and Astronomy (Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2008) and How
Did the First Stars and Galaxies Form?, which is presented in the Princeton
Frontiers in Physics series (Princeton University Press, 2010), and he is co-
author of The First Galaxies in the Universe, which is presented by the
Princeton Series in Astrophysics, 21 (Princeton University Press, 2013). He
also is the author in Hebrew of דע תובשחמ : םימיה תירחאל דע ןושארה בכוכהמ
םימשה (Meha-kokhav ha-rishon ‘ad le aarit ha-yamin, which rendered into
English is From the First Start to Milkomeda, Hierarchical, 2015). An
advocate for science outreach to the public, Prof. Loeb is a frequent
contributor to Scientific American and other publications. In 2012, Time
Magazine selected Prof. Loeb as one of the twenty-five most influential
people in the study of space, and in 2020 Loeb was selected among the
fourteen most inspiring Israelies of the last decade.
Contributors
xvi
Glen Messer
Glen Messer, (Th.D., Boston University), is an Historian and Theologian of
Wesleyan Methodist Traditions. He holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts from
Eastern Michigan University, a Master of Divinity from Boston University,
and a doctorate in the History of Christianity with emphasis on the history
of Methodism and Pietism in the North Atlantic Basin, also from Boston
University. His historical research centers around the relationships between
religion and politics in late 18th and early 19th century America and the anti-
slavery struggle during that time.
Dr. Messer is a passionate teacher. Whether teaching in a graduate school
or teaching and tutoring students online, he is intrigued by how people learn
and teach. He constantly experiments with pedagogy and aims to help
people equip themselves for lifelong pursuits of learning and creative
expression. He was Visiting Assistant Professor at Boston University where
he taught History of Christianity of the Modern Period and Methodist
Studies courses. At Yale Divinity School he taught Methodist Studies
courses. He has also taught other short courses and online courses on a
variety of subjects including literature and writing, and drawing and
painting.
For half a dozen years, Dr. Messer served as an executive staff officer at the
ecumenical and interfaith agency of The United Methodist Church, which
during that time was located in Manhattan’s Upper West Side. There, he
worked as both a historian and theologian, was responsible for all
denominational ecumenical dialogues with other Christian traditions, and
also worked on interfaith relations. Representing The United Methodist
Church, Dr. Messer served as a Commissioner on the Faith and Order
Commission of the National Council of Churches of Christ in the USA. He
also served for a time as a staff representative on the Interfaith Relations
Commission of the same institution. As part of his work with the ecumenical
agency, he authored Perfecting Unity (The Council of Bishops, 2016),
which explores questions relating to Christian unity.
Ronald Nakasone
Ronald Y Nakasone (Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison) is a proponent
of the age-old East Asian literati tradition that encourages self-cultivation,
self-transformation, and self-realization by means of scholarship, community
involvement, and the arts. Professor Nakasone is a member of the Core
Doctoral Faculty at the Graduate Theological Union (GTU) in Berkeley,
Extraterrestrial Intelligence: Academic and Societal Implications
xvii
California. He was a faculty-consultant of Stanford University Geriatric
Education Center for more than twenty years.
At the GTU, Prof. Nakasone offers courses on Buddhist doctrine and
aesthetics and advises students. He served as the convener of the Cultural
and Historical Studies and the Art and Religion Areas. At Stanford
University, he plied his knowledge of Buddhism and East Asian culture and
his experience as a Buddhist priest to research, write articles, and offer
lectures and workshops to medical professionals, religious leaders, social
workers, frontline caregivers, families, and volunteers on best practices to
care for underserved older adults.
Prof. Nakasone has published four books and over 150 papers on Buddhist
doctrine, ethics, and aesthetics, Spirituality and Aging, and Ryūkyūan
(Okinawan) Studies. He is the author of Mapping the Pathways of Huayen
Buddhist Thinking: Its Origins, Unfolding, and Relevance (Peter Lang,
2022). His first book, Ethics of Enlightenment (Dharma Cloud Publishers,
1990), reflects on the experience of Pure Land Buddhist thought and its
living reality for its devotees. He edited Okinawan Diaspora (University of
Hawai`i Press, 2002), a collection of chapters on the Okinawan immigrant
experience in Hawai`i, Philippines, Peru, Japan, and the U.S. He also edited
The Transforming Spiritual Landscape: Buddhist-Christian Dialogue
(Dharma Cloud Publishers, 2005), which consists of reflections on
interreligious dialogue in Thailand. He co-edited the two-volume Asian
Religious Cultures (ABC-CLIO, 2015), a compendium of the Asian religious
experience in America. He has written major articles on Buddhist views on
bioethics for Encyclopedia of Bioethics (Macmillan, 1995) and Encyclopedia
of Ethical, Legal & Policy Issues in Biotechnology (Wiley, 2000).is
Students and colleagues contributed essays to Memory and Imagination,
Essays and Explorations in Buddhist Thought and Culture (Nagata, 2010),
a festschrift commemorating his completion of one life cycle according to
the Chinese zodiac.
Rev. Nakasone regularly preaches to Buddhist devotees and conducts
services at Okinawan community events.
Contributors
xviii
Andrew Newberg
Andrew Newberg, (M.D., University of Pennsylvania), is Professor,
Department of Integrative Medicine and Nutritional Sciences; Professor,
Department of Radiology; and Research Director, Marcus Institute of
Integrative Health, Thomas Jefferson University and Hospital. He is Board
Certified in Internal Medicine and Nuclear Medicine. He has actively
pursued a number of neuroimaging research projects which have included
the study of aging and dementia, epilepsy, and other neurological and
psychiatric disorders. Prof. Newberg has been particularly involved in the
study of mystical and religious experiences, a field referred to as
“neurotheology.” He also has studied the more general mind/body
relationship in both the clinical and research aspects of his career including
pursuing research to understand the physiological correlates of acupuncture
therapy, meditation, and other types of alternative therapies. He has
published over 250 peer reviewed articles and chapters on brain function,
brain imaging, and the study of religious and mystical experiences. He has
published twelve books which have been translated into seventeen different
languages. He was listed as one of the 30 Most Influential Neuroscientists
Alive Today by the Online Psychology Degree Guide.
Prof. Newberg is the co-author of the bestselling books, How God Changes
Your Brain (Ballantine, 2009) and Why God Won’t Go Away: Brain Science
and the Biology of Belief (Ballantine, 2001). He is also a co-author of How
Enlightenment Changes Your Brain: The New Science of Transformation
(Avery, 2016); Words Can Change Your Brain (Hudson Street Press, 2012);
Born to Believe: God, Science, and the Origin of Ordinary and Extraordinary
Beliefs (Free Press, 2006); and The Rabbi's Brain: Mystics, Moderns, and
the Science of Jewish Thinking (Turner, 2018). He also is the author of
several academic books including Neurotheology: How Science Can
Enlighten Us About Spirituality (Columbia University Press, 2018) and
Principles of Neurotheology (Ashgate, 2010), and he is co-author of The
Mystical Mind: Probing the Biology of Belief (Fortress Press, 1999). The
latter book received the 2000 award for Outstanding Books in Theology and
the Natural Sciences presented by the Center for Theology and the Natural
Sciences. Prof. Newberg also produced a video program consisting of
twenty-four lectures entitled “The Spiritual Brain” for The Teaching
Company. He has presented his work at scientific and religious meetings
throughout the world and has appeared on the news and on numerous
television programs.
Extraterrestrial Intelligence: Academic and Societal Implications
xix
Prof. Newberg has appeared in three movies, What the Bleep Do We Know?,
Religulous, and Awake: The Life of Yogananda. His work has been featured
in a number of major media articles including in Newsweek, Time
Magazine, National Geographic, Discover, The New York Times, O
Magazine, Los Angeles Times, London Observer, Philadelphia Inquirer,
and Reader’s Digest.
Ted Peters
Ted Peters, (Ph.D., University of Chicago), is an emeritus professor at the
Graduate Theological Union (GTU), where he co-edits the journal,
Theology and Science on behalf of the Center for Theology and the Natural
Sciences (CTNS) in Berkeley, California. At CTNS, he directs discussion
at the intersection of science, religion, and ethics.
Prof. Peters co-edited Astrotheology: Science and Theology Meet
Extraterrestrial Intelligence (2018) and Astrobiology: Science, Ethics, and
Public Policy (Wiley/Scrivener, 2021). He also is author of UFOs: God's
Chariots? Spirituality, Ancient Aliens, and Religious Yearnings in the Age
of Extraterrestrials (Career Press New Page Books, 2014).
Prof. Peters earned M.A. and Ph.D. degrees at the University of Chicago
and an M.Div. at Trinity Lutheran Seminary. For four decades, Prof. Peters
taught systematic theology as Distinguished Research Professor of
Systematic Theology and Ethics at Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary
while also teaching at the GTU. Prof. Peters is the author or co-author of
330 peer reviewed scholarly articles and twenty books, and he is editor or
co-editor of fourteen collections of essays. His work emphasizes ‘Public
Theology’ and employs the method of theology of culture.
Prof. Peters served as Principal Investigator (PI) on a U.S. National
Institutes of Health (NIH) grant to study the “Theological and Ethical
Implications of the Human Genome Initiative.” Subsequently, he served on
the Ethics Advisory Board of the Geron Corporation and then on the
Standards Working Group of the California Institute for Regenerative
Medicine.
Contributors
xx
Carl Peterson
Carl Peterson (Ph.D., Ohio University), did his postdoc at The Ohio State
University and served as a Lecturer during two of his three years there
teaching chemistry for science students. He also worked as a Consultant at
Battelle Memorial Institute providing mathematical services for special
projects during his last year at Ohio State.
Afterwards, Dr. Peterson went to Ohio Wesleyan University as a Visiting
Professor of Chemistry and as an Adjunct Professor of Physics. Over a
seventeen year period there, he periodically taught a number of courses,
such as quantum chemistry and quantum physics. After four years at Ohio
Wesleyan, Dr. Peterson's stay was interrupted with a two-year stint in
governmental work for the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency in
Columbus, Ohio and a three-year foray into industry at Owens Corning
Fiberglass Corporation in Toledo, Ohio. Upon returning to Ohio Wesleyan
University as an Adjunct Professor of Physics for thirteen more years, Dr.
Peterson taught quantum physics, calculus, and electricity and magnetism.
He also supervised independent study and honors students. Dr. Peterson
remained at Ohio Wesleyan University as an Adjunct while obtaining a
position as a Visiting Professor of Chemistry at the University of Cincinnati
teaching chemistry for science majors and another position at Columbus
State Community College, in Columbus, Ohio teaching physics. Dr.
Peterson also was a full-time Associate Professor at Columbus State
University for three years. He has published on the electronic structure of
polyatomic molecules.
After working in academia, Dr. Peterson became an entrepreneur with more
than 250 employees. At that time, he decided to become an independent
scholar with the primary purpose of breaking the hegemony of the
Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics and advocating instead
for David Bohm’s ontological interpretation of quantum mechanics.
Michael J. Reiss
Michael J. Reiss (Ph.D., University of Cambridge) is Professor of Science
Education at UCL (University College London) Institute of Education,
Visiting Professor at the Royal Veterinary College, Honorary Fellow of the
British Science Association and of the College of Teachers, a Fellow of the
Academy of Social Sciences, and a Priest in the Church of England. He is
President of the International Society for Science and Religion (ISSR) and
of the International Association for Science and Religion in Schools, a
Extraterrestrial Intelligence: Academic and Societal Implications
xxi
member of the Nuffield Council on Bioethics, and the former Director of
Education at the Royal Society.
Prof. Reiss went to university intending to become a theoretical physicist
but soon switched to biology. He did his Ph.D. and postdoc in evolutionary
biology and population genetics, then trained to be a teacher and taught in
schools for five years. He then returned to higher education where he
worked in initial teacher education at primary and secondary levels for
twelve years before moving to UCL, where most of his teaching is now with
doctoral students and where he undertakes research in science education,
sex education, and bioethics.
Prof. Reiss is author of Understanding Science Lessons: Five Years of
Science Teaching (Open University Press, 2000) and Science Education for
a Pluralist Society (Open University Press, 1993), and he is co-author of
Human Flourishing: Scientific Insight and Spiritual Wisdom in Uncertain
Times (Oxford University Press, 2021), Cognitive and Metacognitive
Problem-Solving Strategies in Post-16 Physics (Springer, 2019), Islam and
Health Policies Related to HIV Prevention in Malaysia (Springer, 2018);
An Aims-based Curriculum: The significance of human flourishing for
schools (IOE Press, 2013), Values in Sex Education: From Principles to
Practice (RoutledgeFalmer, 2003), and Improving Nature? The Science and
Ethics of Genetic Engineering (Cambridge University Press. 1996).
Konrad Szocik
Konrad Szocik, (Ph.D., Jagiellonian University, Faculty of Philosophy,
Poland), is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Social Sciences,
University of Information Technology and Management in Rzeszow,
Poland, where he also is a member of the Research Ethics Committee. He
also is the Rector's plenipotentiary for the prevention of bullying,
discrimination, and violence. In the academic year 2021-2022, Prof. Szocik
is a Visiting Scholar at the Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics at Yale
University.
Prof. Szocik is an editor for the journal Studia Humana published by De
Gruyter. He also is the author of two monographs in Polish, a co-author of
Revising Cognitive and Evolutionary Science of Religion. Religion as an
Adaptation (Springer, 2021), editor of two books published in Springer’s
Space and Society series, The Human Factor in a Mission to Mars. An
Interdisciplinary Approach (Springer, 2019) and Human Enhancements for
Space Missions. Lunar, Martian, and Future Missions to the Outer Planets
Contributors
xxii
(Springer, 2020), and co-editor of The Human Factor in the Settlement of
the Moon. An Interdisciplinary Approach (Springer 2021).
Prof. Szocik is the author of more than one hundred scientific articles, more
than forty of which address space missions and human space exploration
primarily from ethical and social perspectives. Currently, he is completing
a monograph on the feminist bioethics of space exploration (Oxford
University Press, 2022).
Prof. Szocik has published in journals including Science, Bioethics, Acta
Astronautica, International Journal of Astrobiology, Space Policy, Futures,
Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Technology in Society,
Science and Engineering Ethics, The New Bioethics, Journal of the British
Interplanetary Society, Spaceflight, Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science,
Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics, Astropolitics, Zygon: Journal of
Religion and Science, Theology and Science, Archive for the Psychology of
Religion, Method and Theory in the Study of Religion, AI in Society, Sage
Open, Current Anthropology, The Heythrop Journal: A Quarterly Review
of Philosophy and Theology, Social Evolution and History, Numen.
Prof. Szocik acknowledges the Bekker Fellowship (3rd edition) funded by
the Polish National Agency for Academic Exchange (Decision No.
PPN/BEK/2020/1/00012/DEC/1) for funding the work on his chapter in this
volume.
Massimo Teodorani
Massimo Teodorani (PhD., Bologna University) is an astrophysicist from
North Italy. His Ph.D. in Astronomy from Bologna University is with a
specialization in stellar physics. He has been carrying out research on
eruptive phenomena in astrophysics, such as supernovas, novas, high-mass
close binary stars with neutron star component, black hole candidate binary
star systems, strongly eruptive protostars (FU Orionis type), and
cataclysmic and pre-cataclysmic stars. He is an expert in photometric and
spectroscopic observational techniques. He has been working as a
researcher at the INAF (Italian National Institute for Astrophysics) Naples
Astronomical Observatory and at the INAF Radioastronomic Observatory
in Medicina, Bologna. Being experienced both in optical and radio
astronomy, Dr. Teodorani also has carried out research on extrasolar planets
(i.e., the search for 22 GHz water maser line in 57 stellar candidates) and
the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI).
Extraterrestrial Intelligence: Academic and Societal Implications
xxiii
Dr. Teodorani takes an observational/experimental and interpretative/theoretical
approach to his research. He also is an expert in the physics of anomalous
plasma phenomena of geophysical interest such as the phenomenon in
Hessdalen, Norway and similar recurrent phenomena around the world. On
these topics, he has carried out considerable research using astronomy-like
strategies and observational techniques and simultaneous multiwavelength
and multi-instrument measurements, and he has published his observational
and theoretical research. He presently is working on new instrument strategies
in this field.
Dr. Teodorani recently taught physics at the Bologna University, and he is a
well-known science communicator in Italy and around the world regarding
subjects such as astrophysics, quantum physics, and anomalistics. He is the
author of eighteen science-oriented books including two textbooks, L’Atomo
e le Particelle Elementari – Manuale per Studenti e Ricercatori (Macro
Edizioni, 2007) and Raccontare l’Universo – Introduzione Divulgativa
all’Astrofisica (Tangram Edizioni Scientifiche, 2020).
PART I:
PHILOSOPHICAL AND SCIENTIFIC
PERSPECTIVES
CHAPTER ONE
CARTOGRAPHIES OF KNOWLEDGE
AND ACADEMIC MAPS
JENSINE ANDRESEN
Maps are amazing things—they tell us where we have been, where we are
now, and where we may decide to go in the future. Human beings accord
incredible importance to maps, often using them to organize significant
trajectories in their lives.
The current consensus and mostly Western cartography of human
knowledge is laid out like a map in the organization of disciplines in the
academy. Here, I use the word “knowledge” in its colloquial sense of facts
accumulated over time pertaining to a particular domain or field of
intellectual inquiry. Setting aside for the moment local knowledge, the map
of major academic disciplines is extremely consistent across world, even
when political ideologies, geopolitical agendas, and languages are not the
least bit consistent between countries or even within them.
The world over, all major academic institutions have a department of
physics, for example, and departments of chemistry, biology, and
mathematics. Consistency in the demarcation of academic disciplines is not
merely present in the natural sciences, either. It also exists in the social
sciences, which are organized across the globe into disciplines such as
psychology, sociology, economics, political science, etc. Even the humanities
are relatively consistent worldwide, with departments of history,
philosophy, religion, aesthetic theory, etc. This of course means that the
same tripartite scheme of natural sciences, social sciences, and the humanities
functions as the consistent organizing principle for knowledge across
cultures, even when political and linguistic systems differ considerably.
In fact, the map of academic disciplines is so consistent across the globe
that we tend to take the current organization of knowledge for granted.
Noticing this consistency, human beings may be tempted to pat themselves
on the back, as if consistency in the organization of disciplines in the
academy means that human beings have ‘gotten it right’—i.e., that they
Cartographies of Knowledge and Academic Maps
3
have uncovered something fundamental about how the world works and the
nature of reality itself—and, beyond this, that they have organized academic
disciplines as a reflection of this fundamental order. But have we ‘gotten it
right?’ Perhaps a little bit, but certainly not entirely.
While the map of academic disciplines human beings possess now
reflects the cartography of knowledge as we best understand it at this
moment in human history, this map has not been particularly helpful in
assisting human beings navigate the practicalities of existence here on
Earth. The high level of strife in human society and how poorly human
beings manage Earth’s resources are two clear signs that the human
cartography of knowledge has major shortcomings and that the map of
academic disciplines needs to be redrawn. This is an urgent issue, since
humankind is facing challenges that are both global in nature, and, also,
existential—hunger and starvation; war and war profiteering; mass human
migrations; refugee crises; the rise of authoritarianism; climate change;
species extinction; loss of biodiversity; pandemics; desertification; potential
asteroid and comet impacts; potential polar shifts; financialization of the
global economy; the global debt bubble; enormous disparities in wealth;
unequal access to resources; human trafficking; violent crime; and numerous,
potential societal collapsology trajectories that could cause human society
to descend into widespread chaos and mayhem.
We often blame poor outcomes in the abovementioned areas on
deficiencies in our political and governance systems, on conflict between
countries, and/or on the exigencies of global and regional power structures.
The real problem lies at a much deeper level, however. Shortcomings and
often outright failings in how we relate to one another, govern ourselves,
and distribute resources result from errors in how we create, organize, and
transmit knowledge. These errors then emerge as deficiencies in the
institutions and power structures that organize human society.
A maladaptive feedback loop exists between poor knowledge
management and poor governance decisions. Ongoing strife and poor
resource management both result from how humankind creates, organizes,
analyzes, and transmits knowledge. When human beings are socialized by
the educational system, media, and social media into perceiving reality in
ways that are incomplete and/or inaccurate, these misperceptions play out
in government and policymaking, thereby demonstrating the real-world
consequences of misunderstandings regarding the nature of reality.
Deficiencies in the human educational system and other mechanisms of
knowledge dissemination feed directly into the organization of and
decisions made in human governance systems. A feedback loop then ensues,
in which errors at the level of government and policymaking feed right back
Chapter One
4
into the educational system when policymakers decide to allocate government
funding to support one line of research over another. Humankind’s inability
to address climate change demonstrates precisely this type of dysfunctional
dynamic. Put bluntly, policymakers are the product of the educational
system, and many of the policymakers in human society have graduated
from the most elite universities on the planet. If their policies don’t work—
and they don’t—then we must redress the educational system itself instead
of spending so much time blaming the individuals who make maladaptive
decisions.
To improve life on Earth, then, we must address deficiencies at the level
of knowledge rather than merely responding ad hoc to one crisis after
another. This means that we must problematize knowledge creation,
organization, analysis, and transmission if we want to get anything useful,
moral, and meaningful done here on Earth—and, also, if we want to join other
species responsibly in space. Perhaps as a good initial step, we should think
about creating academies that specialize in finding solutions to specific
global challenges rather than socializing people into one discipline versus
another.
More or less two decades ago, academics began to come to grips with
the shortcomings of their map of academic disciplines. During this period
in recent intellectual history, many academics embarked upon the path of
interdisciplinarity, with some universities also creating interdisciplinary
programs institutionally. Although the underlying motivation was good, the
results of so-called interdisciplinary research have been very modest. The
false hope that interdisciplinarity alone would forge a path to better
educational outcomes hit hard against the wall of methodological
incongruities between disciplines—and, also, against rigid entrenchment
relating to how disciplines were classified into categories such as science
and the humanities. Accordingly, interdisciplinary discourse often was
impeded because people started from different premises and spoke different
methodological languages. Making the situation worse, no tangible
incentives existed in the academy to learn methodological approaches
outside of those prepotent in one’s own discipline, so many scholars simply
retreated from interdisciplinary venues to continue to conduct research and
to build their careers in their own core disciplines.
Certainly, it goes without saying that if human beings do not perceive
reality correctly—or even well—then their responses to the actual reality in
which they are immersed will be maladaptive. To become adaptive, human
beings must perceive and interpret reality accurately and they must adjust
their own cognitive and emotional responses accordingly. To ensure that
fundamental misperceptions do not reverberate and become amplified in the
Cartographies of Knowledge and Academic Maps
5
human knowledge-action system as a whole, human beings therefore must
create the very best cartography of knowledge and corresponding map of
academic disciplines that they can. Perceiving reality well and forming our
cartographies of knowledge and academic maps correspondingly well will
help human beings survive. It also will promote growth in human
consciousness so that human beings experience more meaning, joy, and
love.
Although reviewing the intellectual history of each country and region
of the world would reveal how, when, and why standardization of academic
disciplines has occurred, the international group of contributors represented
in this volume focus instead on the very existence and implications of such
standardization. More specifically, these scholars consider the implications
of widespread Contact with an advanced extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI)
for the current cartography of human knowledge and map of academic
disciplines. Here, I capitalize “Contact” to indicate widespread Contact over
essentially the entire human species.
Official acknowledgment that unidentified aerial phenomena (UAP) are
real underscores the timeliness and relevance of the considerations
described above. It also provides impetus for academics to start thinking
cogently about the topic of human knowledge in the context of a broader
discussion of extraterrestrial intelligence. How will widespread Contact
impact so-called core disciplines, such as physics, mathematics, chemistry,
biology, history, etc.? Will such core disciplines begin to merge? How will
widespread Contact impact the organizational map of academic disciplines
as a whole? Will boundaries between academic disciplines become more
fluid? Will the categorization of disciplines into the natural sciences, social
sciences, and humanities be replaced by something new? Even further, will
entire categories of knowledge, e.g., religion and science, find a common
ontological ground?
Asking how widespread Contact will impact academia and, indeed, all
of human society, is useful pragmatically, since it will help people prepare
for this eventuality if and when it occurs. How will human knowledge
creation, organization, analysis, and transmission change as creative
acculturation with ETI unfolds? These and similar questions suggest meta
questions, too, such as whether human beings are losing the forest for the
trees when they specialize in increasingly more granular disciplines and
subdisciplines in the academy. Is ever more analytical parsing of reality
useful, or not? Does such excessive analysis distract us from the deeper
reaches of intuition, knowledge, insight, and wisdom that are the real
qualities that imbue existence with meaning?
Chapter One
6
Instead of constant enculturation in granular and standardized
disciplines and subdisciplines, it makes sense to set aside some time for
intellectual off-roading. This requires taking our minds off prescribed,
academic roadways to explore regions not yet mapped. Indeed, maybe such
regions never should be mapped, since any lines artificially imposed on any
terrain impede human beings from seeing how things interrelate, thereby
obscuring the manner in which all aspects of reality cohere together in a
meaningful way to form a whole.
At the end of the day, political regimes will come and go, governments
will rise and fall, and, barring a singularly catastrophic disaster and/or series
of chaotic events with devastating consequences—such as a full-blown
nuclear exchange—human beings will continue to exist. But, by stopping to
consider just how advanced the ETI in our midst right now actually is, and
by asking ourselves how this advanced ETI perceives reality and processes
information, human beings will begin to understand reality much more
clearly themselves. This will improve human knowledge creation,
organization, assimilation, and transmission, and it will help human beings
adapt more successfully to their environment.
Given the significance of the relationship between ETI and humankind
for all aspects of human society, including the connection between
academia and civil society, discussions of ETI and UAP are both timely and
important. These topics will be discussed more widely as humankind
assimilates a more expansive understanding of its place in the Cosmos.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
Peters enjoys maintaining his website
  • Prof
Prof. Peters enjoys maintaining his website, TedsTimelyTake.com.
Peterson enjoys solving math puzzles, watching crowds, and spending quality time with others
  • Dr
Dr. Peterson enjoys solving math puzzles, watching crowds, and spending quality time with others.
Cognitive and Metacognitive Problem-Solving Strategies in Post-16
  • Prof
Prof. Reiss is author of Understanding Science Lessons: Five Years of Science Teaching (Open University Press, 2000) and Science Education for a Pluralist Society (Open University Press, 1993), and he is co-author of Human Flourishing: Scientific Insight and Spiritual Wisdom in Uncertain Times (Oxford University Press, 2021), Cognitive and Metacognitive Problem-Solving Strategies in Post-16 Physics (Springer, 2019), Islam and Health Policies Related to HIV Prevention in Malaysia (Springer, 2018);
Reiss enjoys going to the gym, reading, and visiting museums and art galleries
  • Prof
Prof. Reiss enjoys going to the gym, reading, and visiting museums and art galleries.
Newberg has appeared in three movies, What the Bleep Do We Know?, Religulous, and Awake: The Life of Yogananda. His work has been featured in a number of major media articles including in Newsweek
  • Prof
Prof. Newberg has appeared in three movies, What the Bleep Do We Know?, Religulous, and Awake: The Life of Yogananda. His work has been featured in a number of major media articles including in Newsweek, Time Magazine, National Geographic, Discover, The New York Times, O Magazine, Los Angeles Times, London Observer, Philadelphia Inquirer, and Reader's Digest.
University of Chicago), is an emeritus professor at the Graduate Theological Union (GTU), where he co-edits the journal
  • Ted Peters
  • D Ph
Ted Peters, (Ph.D., University of Chicago), is an emeritus professor at the Graduate Theological Union (GTU), where he co-edits the journal, Theology and Science on behalf of the Center for Theology and the Natural Sciences (CTNS) in Berkeley, California. At CTNS, he directs discussion at the intersection of science, religion, and ethics.
He also is author of UFOs: God's Chariots?
Prof. Peters co-edited Astrotheology: Science and Theology Meet Extraterrestrial Intelligence (2018) and Astrobiology: Science, Ethics, and Public Policy (Wiley/Scrivener, 2021). He also is author of UFOs: God's Chariots? Spirituality, Ancient Aliens, and Religious Yearnings in the Age of Extraterrestrials (Career Press New Page Books, 2014).
Subsequently, he served on the Ethics Advisory Board of the Geron Corporation and then on the Standards Working Group of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine
  • Prof
Prof. Peters served as Principal Investigator (PI) on a U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant to study the "Theological and Ethical Implications of the Human Genome Initiative." Subsequently, he served on the Ethics Advisory Board of the Geron Corporation and then on the Standards Working Group of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine. member of the Nuffield Council on Bioethics, and the former Director of Education at the Royal Society.
Szocik is the author of more than one hundred scientific articles, more than forty of which address space missions and human space exploration primarily from ethical and social perspectives. Currently, he is completing a monograph on the feminist bioethics of space exploration
  • Prof
Prof. Szocik is the author of more than one hundred scientific articles, more than forty of which address space missions and human space exploration primarily from ethical and social perspectives. Currently, he is completing a monograph on the feminist bioethics of space exploration (Oxford University Press, 2022).
Theology and Science, Archive for the Psychology of Religion, Method and Theory in the Study of Religion
  • Prof
Prof. Szocik has published in journals including Science, Bioethics, Acta Astronautica, International Journal of Astrobiology, Space Policy, Futures, Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Technology in Society, Science and Engineering Ethics, The New Bioethics, Journal of the British Interplanetary Society, Spaceflight, Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science, Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics, Astropolitics, Zygon: Journal of Religion and Science, Theology and Science, Archive for the Psychology of Religion, Method and Theory in the Study of Religion, AI in Society, Sage Open, Current Anthropology, The Heythrop Journal: A Quarterly Review of Philosophy and Theology, Social Evolution and History, Numen.