Conference Paper

Response of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) to elevated [CO2] in yield, biomass and chlorophyll fluorescence

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Abstract

The impact of elevated [CO2] (e[CO2]) in on yield, biomass (BM) and chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) was analyzed in three genotypes of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), a key food-security crop. Active-and passive-sensed ChlF traits acquired by the Light-Induced-Fluorescence-Transient (LIFT), Moni-Pulse-Amplitude-Modulation (MoniPAM), and Fluorescence Box (FloX) instruments were compared. Total biomass increased for all genotypes under e[CO2], but their biomass partitioning significantly differed. The highest yielding genotype under e[CO2] also showed the highest photosynthetic activity according to different active-sensed ChlF methods. Furthermore, e[CO2] resulted in earlier senescence, which was detected by either satellite-or FloX-derived Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Moreover, we observed a significant agreement between MoniPAM-and LIFT-measured ChlF data (R 2 = 0.89, p = 0.02), as well as between SIF and FloX measurements (R 2 = 0.62, p = 0.03).

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Maize and bean plants response to C02 enrichment
  • P Sánchez-Espino
  • A Larqué-Saavedra
  • T Nava-Sánchez
  • C Trejo
P. Sánchez-Espino, A. Larqué-Saavedra, T. Nava-Sánchez, C. Trejo, "Maize and bean plants response to CO2 enrichment," Agriciencia, pp. 311-320, 1999.
Maize and bean plants response to CO
  • P Sánchez-Espino
  • A Larqué-Saavedra
  • T Nava-Sánchez
  • C Trejo
Maize and bean plants response to C02 enrichment
  • sánchez-espino