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Dataset for Multidimensional Assessment to Incentivise Decentralised Energy Investments in Sub-Saharan Africa

Authors:
  • BlueFox Data
  • Institute of Advanced Studies (iASK), Kőszeg, Hungary

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In this data article, we present datasets from the construction of a composite indicator, the Photovoltaic Decentralised Energy Investment (PV-DEI) index, presented in detail in [1]. This article consists of the comprehensive energy-related data collected in practice from several sources, and from the outputs of the methodology described in [1]. The PV-DEI index includes 52 indicators and was designed and developed to measure the multidimensional factors that currently direct decentralised renewable energy investments. The PV-DEI composite indicator was constructed because factors stimulating investment cannot be captured by a single indicator, e.g. competitiveness, affordability, governance [1]. The PV-DEI was built in alignment with a theoretical framework guided by an extensive review of the literature surrounding investment in decentralised Photovoltaic (PV), which led to the selection of its indicators. The structure of the PV-DEI was evaluated for its soundness using correlational assessments and principal component analyses (PCA). The raw data provided in this article can enable stakeholders to focus on specific country indicators, and how scores on these indicators contributed to a countries overall rank within the PV-DEI. The data can be used to weight indicators depending on the specifications of several different stakeholders (such as NGO, private sector or international institutions).
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WACC the dog: the effect of financing costs on the levelized cost of solar PV power
  • Ondraczek
  • A Bender
  • M Moner-Girona
  • W Becker
NASA Earth Observatory. Earth at Night 2019. https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/. Accessed May 7, 2019. A. Bender, M. Moner-Girona and W. Becker et al. / Data in Brief 37 (2021) 107265