Conference Paper

The Effect of Spatial Design on User Memory Performance Using the Method of Loci in VR

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Abstract

Based on the Method of Loci, the following experiment compares the effect of two different virtual environments on participants’ memory performance. The primary task consists of remembering a sequence of random playing cards. Each virtual environment is based on a different architectural style with a different layout. One is inspired by a Palladian style architecture, and the other by a Modern curved architecture.

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... 3D simulation The MP is a 3D simulation. Without physical rules [12], [14], [15], [17] With physic engine [1], [3], [18]- [23], [25]- [27] Augmented reality ...
... The MP is a photorealistic digital construction. [18], [25] ...
... The MP is an unfamiliar environment. [17], [18], [21] ~ [12], [16] Fictional ...
Conference Paper
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