Research ProposalPDF Available

Call for chapter proposals: Indigenous Methodologies, Research and Practices for Sustainable Development

Authors:
  • Hamburg University of Applied Sciences (Germany) & Manchester Metropolitan University (UK)

Abstract

Extended abstracts of 500 words for chapters are requested, exploring different methodological considerations applicable to Indigenous settings and how these considerations can drive sustainable development, particularly within the lens of the SDGs. There is no restriction to subject areas, SDGs, theoretical lenses, methodological approaches, geographies, and communities. Chapters can be based on case studies, theories, insightful reflections, in-depth reviews, primary or secondary data. Published chapters of the book will range from 6000-7000 words, inclusive of references, tables, and figures. We have a limited number of chapters we are aiming for and given that the abstract selection is a competitive process, please provide clarity on the structure and indicative content of your prospective chapter. We envisage the output to be a valuable handbook for those researching any subject related to the SDGs and Indigenous contexts. Further guidelines to authors would be issued following acceptance of abstract.
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Call for chapters
Indigenous Methodologies, Research and Practices for Sustainable
Development
Editors
Dr Marcellus F. Mbah, Nottingham Trent University, UK
Professor Ane Turner Johnson, Rowan University, USA
Professor Metropolitan University, UK ManchesterWalter Leal Filho,
Dr Sandra Ajaps, Nottingham Trent University UK
Background
Whilst academic research has long been grounded on the idea of western or scientific
epistemologies, this often does not capture the uniqueness of Indigenous contexts (Johnson et
al., 2016), and particularly as it relates to the achievement of the United Nations Sustainable
Development Goals (SDGs). The SDGs were announced in 2015, accompanied by 17 goals
and 169 targets. These goals are the means through which Agenda 2030 for sustainable
development is to be pursued and realised over the next 15 years, and the contributions of
Indigenous peoples are essential to achieving these goals (UN 2015).
Indigenous peoples can be found in practically every region of the world, living on ancestral
homelands in major cities, rainforests, mountain regions, desert plains, the arctic, and small
Pacific Islands (UN 2009). Their languages, knowledges and values are rooted in the
landscapes and natural resources within their territories (Watene & Yap, 2015). However,
many Indigenous peoples are now minorities within their homelands and globally, and there is
a dearth of research based on Indigenous epistemologies and methodologies. Furthermore,
academic research on Indigenous peoples is typically based on western lenses, from
perspectives of what Walter (2018) termed 5D data difference, disparity, disadvantage,
dysfunction, and deprivation. Similarly, Kovach (2015) asserts that emancipatory research
methodologies have primarily been defined by the epistemological framework of the western
culture, including Eurocentric emancipatory scholarship acting to decolonise research.
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Thus, the paucity of Indigenous methodologies within mainstream research discourses present
challenges for implementing practical research designs and interpretations that can address
epistemological distinctiveness within Indigenous communities. Indigenous methodologies are
methodologies where the approach to, and undertaking of, research process and practices take
Indigenous worldviews, perspectives, values and lived experience as their central axis (Walter
& Suina, 2019). For example, in her book titled Decolonizing Methodologies, Smith (1999)
delineated a set of principles and philosophy of the Kaupapa Maori as an approach to any
research that relates to Maori. In addition, participatory action research methodology was
derived from Freire’s (1973) work with Brazilian farmers, where emphasis was on engaging
with Indigenous people from the inception to the dissemination of the research. Indigenous
methodologies can be envisioned to be emancipatory (Clement, 2019), critical (Denzin,
Lincoln, & Smith, 2008), decolonising (Keane, Khupe, & Seehawer, 2017; Chilisa, 2017),
participatory (Evans et al., 2009), relational (Datta, 2015), place based (Wooltorton et al.,
2020), etc.
There is therefore the need to articulate, as well as bring to the nexus of research aimed at
fostering sustainable development, a decolonising perspective in research design and practice.
This would not only have the potential to overcome any form of epistemic violence (Spivak,
1988) perpetuated towards Indigenous communities and their knowledge systems, but also can
engender the achievement of the SDGs, with a focus on supporting Indigenous groups to drive
their own development agenda, based on their worldviews and priorities.
We therefore invite submissions on Indigenous methodologies, research, and practice with
focus on sustainable development. Authors are encouraged to critically reflect on Indigenous
approaches to research design and implementation towards achieving the sustainable
development goals, as well as the associated challenges and opportunities. Suggestions for
papers that advance knowledge, theory, and practice of Indigenous methodologies for
sustainable development are outlined below, and this list is only indicative and not exhaustive.
Indigenous methodologies and sustainable development goals
Indigenous research agendas and priorities for sustainable development
Indigenous research methods
Interconnected and relational methodologies in Indigenous contexts
Justice and sustainability in Indigenous research approaches
Analysis and interpretation of data based on Indigenous methodologies
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Analytical processes for data in form of proverbs, songs, folktales, and other
Indigenous assets
Stories and narratives as Indigenous research data
Strategies for authentic representation of Indigenous voices
Emancipatory and democratic research approaches in Indigenous settings
Best research practices for sustainable development in Indigenous contexts
Participatory action research amongst Indigenous peoples
Decolonising methodologies and postcolonial Indigenous research
Indigenous community-based research
Ethical considerations for Indigenous research
Guidelines to authors
Extended abstract of 500 words for chapters is requested, exploring different methodological
considerations applicable to Indigenous settings and how these considerations can drive
sustainable development, particularly within the lens of the SDGs. There is no restriction to
subject areas, SDGs, theoretical lenses, methodological approaches, geographies, and
communities. Chapters can be based on case studies, theories, insightful reflections, in-depth
reviews, primary or secondary data. Published chapters of the book will range from 6000-7000
words, inclusive of references, tables, and figures. We have a limited number of chapters we
are aiming for and given that the abstract selection is a competitive process, please provide
clarity on the structure and indicative content of your prospective chapter. We envisage the
output to be a valuable handbook for those researching any subject related to the SDGs and
Indigenous contexts. Further guidelines to authors would be issued following acceptance of
abstract.
Submissions
Extended abstract with the title of the contribution and the full contact details of the authors
should be sent to Dr Sandra Ajaps at the following email address created for the needs of the
book: indigenousmed.book@gmail.com
Peer review
All submitted abstracts will undergo a rigorous peer review process. To ensure timely
publication, we may call on a few authors of successful abstracts to help with the peer review
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of the submitted full draft chapters in return, they will receive acknowledgement for their
additional contribution.
Important deadlines
Extended abstract deadline: 30.08.2021
Full chapters deadline for successful abstracts: 30.11.2021
Revised chapters deadline: 10.01.2022
Anticipated publication date: Spring 2022
Publisher
The book will be published as part of the "World Sustainability Series" by
Springer (http://www.springer.com/series/13384?detailsPage=titles), which is one of the top 5
world scientific publishers.
References
Chilisa, B., 2017. Decolonising transdisciplinary research approaches: an African perspective
for enhancing knowledge integration in sustainability science. Sustainability
Science, 12(5), pp.813-827.
Clement, V. (2019). Beyond the sham of the emancipatory Enlightenment: Rethinking the
relationship of Indigenous epistemologies, knowledges, and geography through
decolonizing paths. Progress in Human Geography, 43(2), 276-294.
Datta, R. (2015). A relational theoretical framework and meanings of land, nature, and
sustainability for research with Indigenous communities. Local Environment, 20(1), 102-
113.
Denzin, N. K., Lincoln, Y. S., & Smith, L. T. (Eds.). (2008). Handbook of critical and
indigenous methodologies. Sage.
Evans, M., Hole, R., Berg, L. D., Hutchinson, P., & Sookraj, D. (2009). Common insights,
differing methodologies: Toward a fusion of indigenous methodologies, participatory
action research, and white studies in an urban aboriginal research agenda. Qualitative
inquiry, 15(5), 893-910.
Freire, P. (1996). Pedagogy of the oppressed (revised). New York: Continuum.
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Johnson, J. T., Howitt, R., Cajete, G., Berkes, F., Louis, R. P., & Kliskey, A. (2016). Weaving
Indigenous and sustainability sciences to diversify our methods. Sustainability
Science, 11(1), 1-11.
Keane, M., Khupe, C., & Seehawer, M. (2017). Decolonising methodology: Who benefits from
indigenous knowledge research?. Educational Research for social change, 6(1), 12-24.
Kovach, M. (2015). Emerging from the margins: Indigenous methodologies. Research as
resistance: Revisiting critical, Indigenous, and anti-oppressive approaches, 2, 43-64.
Smith, L. T. (1999). Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples. London
& New York: Zed Books Ltd.
Spivak, G. C. (1988). Can the subaltern speak? Can the subaltern speak? Reflections on the
history of an idea, 21-78.
UN (United Nations; 2009). “State of the World’s Indigenous Peoples.” Accessed May 21,
2021. http:// www.un.org/esa/socdev/unpfii/documents/SOWIP/en/SOWIP_web.pdf.
UN (United Nations; 2015). Transforming our world: The 2030 agenda for sustainable
development. New York: United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs.
Walter & Suina (2019) Indigenous data, indigenous methodologies and indigenous data
sovereignty, International Journal of Social Research Methodology, 22:3, 233-243, DOI:
10.1080/13645579.2018.1531228
Walter, M. (2018). The voice of indigenous data: beyond the markers of disadvantage. Griffith
Review, (60), 256-263.
Watene, K., & Yap, M. (2015). Culture and sustainable development: Indigenous
contributions. Journal of Global Ethics, 11(1), 51-55.
Wooltorton, S., Collard, L., Horwitz, P., Poelina, A., & Palmer, D. (2020). Sharing a place-
based indigenous methodology and learnings. Environmental Education Research, 26(7),
917-934.
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Handbook of critical and indigenous methodologies
  • N K Denzin
  • Y S Lincoln
  • Smith
Denzin, N. K., Lincoln, Y. S., & Smith, L. T. (Eds.). (2008). Handbook of critical and indigenous methodologies. Sage.
Pedagogy of the oppressed (revised)
  • P Freire
Freire, P. (1996). Pedagogy of the oppressed (revised). New York: Continuum.