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Déconstruire les idées reçues sur les start-up, la nouvelle responsabilité dévolue aux acteurs de l’accompagnement entrepreneurial

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Deux types d'entrepreneurs : l'opérateur et le visionnaire. Conséquences pour l'éducation
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