Article

The flux and reflux of science : the study of the tides and the organization of early Victorian science /

Authors:
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the author.

Abstract

Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Minnesota, 2000. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 410-427). Photocopy.

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the author.

... 1838, p. 2). 54 In his doctoral dissertation, Reidy explains Whewell's preference for equilibrium-theory by pointing to Whewell's views on the history of astronomy: in contrast to Laplace's account, Newton's theory, allowed the construction of (tide) tables, an activity which was crucial in the sequel of inductive epochs (Reidy (2000), pp. 374-375). ...
Article
Primarily between 1833 and 1840, Whewell attempted to accomplish what natural philosophers and scientists since at least Galileo had failed to do: to provide a systematic and broad-ranged study of the tides and to attempt to establish a general scientific theory of tidal phenomena. In the essay at hand, I document the close interaction between Whewell’s philosophy of science (especially his methodological views) and his scientific practice as a tidologist. I claim that the intertwinement between Whewell’s methodology and his tidology is more fundamental than has hitherto been documented.
... 1838, p. 2). 54 In his doctoral dissertation, Reidy explains Whewell's preference for equilibrium-theory by pointing to Whewell's views on the history of astronomy: in contrast to Laplace's account, Newton's theory, allowed the construction of (tide) tables, an activity which was crucial in the sequel of inductive epochs (Reidy (2000), pp. 374-375). ...
Article
Primarily between 1833 and 1840, William Whewell attempted to accomplish what natural philosophers and scientists since at least Galileo had failed to do: to provide a systematic and broad-ranged study of the tides and to attempt to establish a general scientific theory of tidal phenomena. I document the close interaction between Whewell’s philosophy of science (especially his methodological views) and his scientific practice as a tidologist. I claim that the intertwinement between Whewell’s methodology and his tidology is more fundamental than has hitherto been documented.
Article
Predicting the tide in four ports, the Admiralty Tide Table (ATT) came out in early 1833. The table was for London and three naval dockyards. The observations at those dockyards, from which the ATT was first made, have recently come to light (Anonymous, 1833). This paper exposes the circumstance of the tables' construction; it is also an analysis of the later part of the observation series. The analysis is a comparison of the difference between observation and contemporary prediction, and to tides synthesised from the modern method. The ATT were only admitted into production after comparisons were made to its competitors. Those comparisons were for London alone and a recent study also concentrates on that one area. This study extends comparison to the remaining three-quarters of the early ATT: to Sheerness, Portsmouth and Plymouth.