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The Strategy of Style: Music, Struggle, and the Aesthetics of Sahrawi Nationalism in Exile

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The Strategy of Style: Music, Struggle, and the Aesthetics of Sahrawi Nationalism in Exile

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The abstract for this document is available on CSA Illumina.To view the Abstract, click the Abstract button above the document title.
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La prisión del tiempo: los cambios sociales en los campamentos de refugiados saharauis Sophie Caratini es antropóloga y directora de investigación en el Centro Nacional de Investigación Científica (CNRS), en la Universidad de Tours (Francia). En 1985 defiende una tesis en antropología sobre la sociedad Rgaybat (Les Rgaybat 1610-1934, París, L'Harmattan, 1989, 2 vols.), de 1983 a 1991 dirige la sección de Etnología del Instituto del Mundo Árabe en París, y en 1993 entra en el CNRS, en el laboratorio Urbama de la Universidad de Tours, tras haber publicado el relato de su primer viaje al norte de Mauritania y su encuentro con los saharauis (Les enfants des nuages, París, Éditions du Seuil, 1993; trad. esp.: Los hijos de las nubes, Madrid, Ediciones del Oriente y del Mediterráneo, de próxima aparición). Retoma a partir de entonces su investigación fundamental, y lleva a cabo investigaciones in situ en los campamentos de refugiados saharauis (La république des sables. Anthropologie d'une révolution, París, L'Harmattan, 2003), a la vez que indaga en la historia colonial del norte de Mauritania (L'éducation saharienne d'un képi noir, París, L'Harmattan, 2002). También es autora de un ensayo epistemológico (Les non-dits de l'anthropologie, París, PUF, 2004) y prosigue con su investigación activa sobre el desarrollo en Mauritania, sin abandonar su reflexión acerca de la alteridad nómada. Actualmente dirige un equipo multidisciplinar de doce investigadores financiado por la ANR (Agencia Nacional de la Investigación) que trabaja en torno a «La cuestión del poder en las recomposiciones sociales y religiosas en África del norte y del oeste» (proyecto PRANO).
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Thesis (Ph. D.)--CUNY, 2001. Photocopy. Includes bibliographical references and discography (p. 290-309).
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