ArticleLiterature Review

Hip Arthroplasty in Patients with Osteogenesis Imperfecta

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Abstract

»: Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare congenital disorder that affects connective tissue. »: Modern medicine has mitigated the mortality that is associated with OI, allowing patients to live a near-normal life span. »: The degenerative process in OI is probably accelerated because of subclinical intra-articular fractures, joint laxity, and distorted femoral and acetabular anatomy. »: Total hip arthroplasty is seldom performed in patients with OI; it is technically difficult due to bone fragility, deformity, soft-tissue alteration, acetabular protrusion, the risk of intraoperative and postoperative fractures, and joint laxity. »: This review highlights that patients with OI need hip arthroplasty procedures at an early age and that early revision surgery can be expected. New-generation uncemented implants may improve implant survivorship.

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