Book

THE SHIFTING TERRAIN AND SHADES OF DEVELOPMENT THEMES, DISCOURSE AND PRACTICE IN ZIMBABWE

Authors:
  • Zimbabwe Ezekiel Guti University (ZEGU)

Abstract

Development is multi-dimensional aspect of human life that can be applied spatially and temporarily by different stakeholders and players. It is shaped through policy, stakeholder participation and by caring for the ecological resources that are found in various locales of the globe. Development includes a deliberate progression that is defined by both ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ resources. Over the years, different paradigms have emerged and have head a bearing on development. Environmentalism is a paradigm that concerns itself with a quest towards preserving ecological resources as and when development has been put to realisation. Modernisation has been that concern that has pushed for better infrastructure and services for the users, including infrastructure development and upgrading. For those places difficult to access, there have been thrusts around building communication channels. Electrification has been a huge drive by governments towards mitigating against challenges, especially in rural areas where deforestation has been a major challenge. On the soft side, of matters of development, concerns have been on increasing the voice of the marginalised group as well as promoting the rights of everyone, hence rights-based development. On the same token, creating and enhancing institutions for better governance, have been emerging issues. The current book volume brings into the fore various contributions and debates around the subject of development and transformation. Covered in the book are issues of the state and animal diseases, rural poverty, public interest and street vending, livelihood strategies by street children, youth and employment dynamics and gender and street trading. Other areas are smart cities, solid waste management, landscape design, innovation, libraries, business and development promotion and economic development. The book is an attempt to proffer a multidisciplinary curve to the development debate in Zimbabwe. Evident in the discourses are the different tones and shades of policy pronouncements and interventions that the state and its institutions in the country have tried, from time to time, to put in place. The policy space has always been one of contestation, with the generality of the populations seeking to fit or outmanoeuvre government action.
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