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Washington's Small Forest Landowners in 2020: Status, trends and recommendations after 20 years of Forests & Fish.

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Washington State Legislature tasked the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences within the College of the Environment at the University of Washington in Seattle to address a set of questions that broadly deal with the status of Washington’s small forest landowners (SFLOs) and their lands, including their current state, trends, regulatory impacts, state policies and programs, and recommendations to help encourage “continued management of nonindustrial forests for forestry uses, including traditional timber harvest uses, open space uses, or as a part of developing carbon market schemes” (ESB 5330, p. 4). In the submitted Report, we adopt a multi-pronged set of social and land use science methods to answer the Bill’s questions. The use of property records and remotely sensed data allows for a “census” coverage of SFLO parcel data for the State and a comprehensive trends analysis.
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