Conference PaperPDF Available

New Craniodental Material of Rhinocerotids (Perissodactyla, Rhinocerotidae) from the Late Miocene of Samos Island, Greece

Authors:
th
5 International Meeting of
Early-stage Researchers
in Palaeontology
Lithuania
2021
Vilnius University Press
5th International Meeting of Early-stage Researchers in Palaeontology
Online event, May 18-21
Book of ABstrActs
2021
69
NEW CRANIODENTAL MATERIAL OF RHINOCEROTIDS (PERISSODACTYLA,
RHINOCEROTIDAE) FROM THE LATE MIOCENE OF SAMOS ISLAND, GREECE
G. Svorligkou1, *, I. Giaourtsakis2, S. Roussiakis1
1Faculty of Geology and Geoenvironment, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece
2Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Germany
*geosvorligk@geol.uoa.gr
The rich and diverse Late Miocene fauna excavated from the Mytilinii Formation on Samos Island, Greece,
consists of an impressive number of mammalian taxa, including three different rhinocerotid genera. In this
report, previously undescribed specimens housed at the collections of the Museum of Palaeontology and
Geology in Athens (AMPG), excavated in1903 by Prof. Theodoros Skoufos, are evaluated. The small-sized
hornless rhinocerotid Chilotherium schlosseri, represented by numerous specimens, is characterized by the
flattened frontals, the retracted nasal notch, as well as by the markedly widened mandibular symphysis featuring
two strong and tusk-like second lower incisors. The tandem-horned rhinocerotid “Diceros” neumayri is also
well-represented by several specimens in the AMPG collections, whereas Dihoplus pikermiensis is relatively
scarce. The fossils were still embedded in their original sediments, which can be distinguished to either a
tuffaceous conglomerate or a calcitic sandstone. These distinct sediment types indicate that the specimens
comprising the AMPG collection may have originated from at least two different fossiliferous horizons of the
Mytilinii Formation. In Samos, “D.neumayri emerges as the dominant horned species, hornless Chilotherium
is notably present, and D. pikermiensis is rare. On the contrary, in the classical locality of Pikermi, D.
pikermiensis is the dominant horned species, “D.neumayri is less frequent, whereas Acerorhinus is the sole
hornless rhinocerotid taxon present. These marked differences observed in the relative distribution and
abundance of rhinocerotid taxa among the Turolian localities of Greece and adjacent regions appear to have
been primarily influenced by environmentally controlled provincial differences. The relatively slender and
brachydont Acerorhinus and D. pikermiensis seem to have preferred more closed and temperate niches, whereas
the more robust and specialized “D.neumayri and Chilotherium appear to have favoured more open and dry
habitats.
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