Article

Albinism in Brazilian common opossums (Didelphis aurita)

Authors:
  • Instituo de Pesquisa e Reabilitação de Animais Marinhos, Cariacica, ES, Brazil
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Abstract

Albinism has been sporadically recorded in Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana) in the United States and Mexico, but records of pigmentation disorders in other Didelphis spp. are rare. The Brazilian common opossum (Didelphis aurita) is a cat-sized nocturnal omnivorous marsupial that inhabits Atlantic and Araucaria forests in South America. A litter of five young Brazilian common opossums was rescued at Espírito Santo state, southeast Brazil, of which two were albinos (one male, one female) and the remaining had normal pigmentation (three males). The two albinos had a complete lack of integumentary and retinal pigmentation, representing the first recorded cases of albinismin this species (and the first record in a Didelphis sp. other than the Virginia opossum).

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... Different mammal species tend to be characterized by the differing extent of albinism, which may be total or partial, with records in Didelphis aurita (Wied-Neuwied, 1826) (Vanstreels et al. 2021 (Landis et al. 2020) and different bat species (e.g., Romano et al. 2015;Rosa et al. 2017;me et al. 2021;Ventorin et al. 2021). being reported for South American rodents. ...
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