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Investigating the Structural Model of the Relationship Between Self-Compassion and Psychological Hardiness with Family Cohesion in Women with War-Affected Spouses: The Mediating Role of Self-Worth

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Investigating the Structural Model of the Relationship Between Self-Compassion and Psychological Hardiness with Family Cohesion in Women with War-Affected Spouses: The Mediating Role of Self-Worth

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The present study was conducted to investigate the structural model of the relationship between self-compassion and psychological hardiness with family cohesion about the mediating role of self-worth among women with war-affected spouses. The research method was descriptive and correlational. The statistical population comprised all women with war-affected spouses in Mashhad city (Iran) in 2019. Out of 1250 war-affected spouses, 294 were selected as the sample through voluntary and convenience sampling based on Morgan’s table. To measure the variables, Olson’s Family Cohesion Scale (1999), Neff’s Self-Compassion Scale (Neff, Self and Identity 2:223–250, 2003), Contingencies of Self-Worth Scale by Crocker et al. (Crocker et al., Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 85:894–908, 2003) and Kobasa’s Psychological Hardiness Questionnaire-Short Form (Kobasa, Sander (ed), Social psychology of health and illness, Erbium, Hillsdale, 1982) were used. For data analysis, Pearson correlation tests and path analysis were used. The results demonstrated that self-compassion and psychological hardiness were directly related to family cohesion, and self-compassion and psychological hardiness indirectly affected family cohesion through self-worth and each of the components of self-compassion and psychological hardiness had a significant positive relationship with family cohesion. Based on the findings of this study, it can be concluded that the relationship between self-compassion and psychological hardiness with family cohesion is not simple and linear, and self-worth may mediate this relationship.
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Vol:.(1234567890)
Contemporary Family Therapy (2022) 44:276–283
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10591-021-09579-5
1 3
ORIGINAL PAPER
Investigating theStructural Model oftheRelationship Between
Self‑Compassion andPsychological Hardiness withFamily Cohesion
inWomen withWar‑Affected Spouses: The Mediating Role
ofSelf‑Worth
AkramKhosravi1· EbrahimNamani2
Accepted: 12 April 2021 / Published online: 4 May 2021
© The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2021
Abstract
The present study was conducted to investigate the structural model of the relationship between self-compassion and psy-
chological hardiness with family cohesion about the mediating role of self-worth among women with war-affected spouses.
The research method was descriptive and correlational. The statistical population comprised all women with war-affected
spouses in Mashhad city (Iran) in 2019. Out of 1250 war-affected spouses, 294 were selected as the sample through volun-
tary and convenience sampling based on Morgan’s table. To measure the variables, Olson’s Family Cohesion Scale (1999),
Neff’s Self-Compassion Scale (Neff, Self and Identity 2:223–250, 2003), Contingencies of Self-Worth Scale by Crocker
etal. (Crocker etal., Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 85:894–908, 2003) and Kobasas Psychological Hardiness
Questionnaire-Short Form (Kobasa, Sander (ed), Social psychology of health and illness, Erbium, Hillsdale, 1982) were used.
For data analysis, Pearson correlation tests and path analysis were used. The results demonstrated that self-compassion and
psychological hardiness were directly related to family cohesion, and self-compassion and psychological hardiness indirectly
affected family cohesion through self-worth and each of the components of self-compassion and psychological hardiness
had a significant positive relationship with family cohesion. Based on the findings of this study, it can be concluded that the
relationship between self-compassion and psychological hardiness with family cohesion is not simple and linear, and self-
worth may mediate this relationship.
Keywords Self-compassion· Hardiness· Family cohesion· Self-worth
Introduction
War is one of the phenomena that has numerous physical,
psychological, social, family and occupational consequences
for soldiers and their families during the war, after return-
ing from the war and even years after the end of the war
(Ahmadi etal., 2010). Considering the significant dam-
ages inflicted on veterans, the need to take care of them by
family members increase (Steely, Marviyama, & Galinker,
2010). Meanwhile, the spouses of war-affected people bear
the brunt of the problems and try to support their veteran
husband. Moreover, the wives of veterans have to play a
greater supportive role for the welfare and comfort of other
family members, which reflects their key role in the families
of war victims (Figley, 1997). King etal. (2006) stated that
war-related injuries affect not only veterans who have experi-
enced these conditions, but also other aspects of their family
functioning, including family cohesion and adjustment and
relationship with the spouse. Cohesion, as one of the most
influential structures in the family, provides an important
aspect of trying to have a mutual understanding among fam-
ily members (Khanzadeh etal., 2013). Olson etal. (1983)
described cohesion as one of the most frequently used con-
cepts in explaining family behavior and defined it as the
emotional bond between family members. In other words,
* Ebrahim Namani
encounseling79@gmail.com; a.namani@hsu.ac.ir
Akram Khosravi
sa.ba51@yahoo.com
1 Master ofCounseling, Department ofCounseling, Electronic
Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran
2 Department ofEducational Sciences, Faculty ofLiterature
andHumanities, Hakim Sabzevari University, Sabzevar, Iran
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