Article

Preliminary study of temperature effect on life span and production potential of a tropical parthenogenetic Artemia form Yinggehai Saltern (Hainan, China)

Authors:
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the authors.

Abstract

Yinggehai Saltern is located in a tropical area and it is the habitat of a rare pentaploid parthenogenetic Artemia. This study was assayed under laboratory condition where effect of temperature was evaluated on life span and production potential. Our results documented that increasing temperature to 28 ºC had negative influence on life span of Yinggehai population, while the highest production was recorded at 28 ºC. Although high temperature could significantly decrease the life span of Yinggehai population, it represented the high reproductive performance at this condition.

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the authors.

ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
Article
Maturation rates, fecundity, and generation times in Artemia fransiscana Kellogg 1906 from Lake Grassmere, New Zealand, were studied in the laboratory using up to 24 replicated combinations of temperature (8 to 32°C) and salinity (80 to 260%.) with adequate natural algal food. Fecundity was calculated from individual counts of offspring from separate replicate females over their reproductive life, and also by estimation using replicates each containing a number of females. The numbers of batches of offspring, and numbers of offspring per batch were determined, along with time spans for gestation period and length of reproductive life for females in each temperature-salinity combination. Relationships between these reproductive variables were examined using correlations and scattergrams. Polynomial prediction models were constructed for both time to 50% maturity and for generation times. Experimental generation times were used to estimate the number of generations per year in the Lake Grassmere ponds based on known temperature-salinity combinations over an annual cycle.
Article
Growth and survival of Artemia fransiscana Kellogg 1906 from Lake Grassmere, New Zealand were studied in the laboratory using 24 replicated combinations of temperature (8–32°C) and salinity (80–260%.) with adequate natural algal food. Growth curves were computed for all temperature-salinity combinations up to a maximum of 100 days. Analyses of variance for growth time to 6.0 mm and for per cent juvenile mortality were completed separately and polynomial prediction models were constructed. Temperature and salinity accounted for 81.3 and 99.6% of the total sum of squares for growth and per cent juvenile mortality, respectively, with temperature the major determinant in both cases. A. fransiscana achieved fastest growth at 20 to 28°C in 100 to 170%. S. Over 90% of nauplii survived to maturity within this range, and individuals lived for ≈ 5 months.
Article
We have applied the technique of random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) to the analysis of the relationships among four species of brine shrimp: Artemia franciscana, A. urmiana, A. sinica, and A. parthenogenetica. Seventy ten-base synthetic oligonucleotides were used to amplify a total of 458 distinct fragments. DNA polymorphisms were found in all the species examined; the highest percentage of polymorphic bands was found in A. parthenogenetica, with 28.8 per cent. Each species was scored for the presence or absence of every amplification product and the data entered into a binary data matrix. Cluster analysis was then performed to create a dendrogram using UPGMA by the NTSYS program. There are significant differences between bisexual species and parthenogenetic populations. A. parthenogenetica provided 94 specific molecular markers, while bisexual species gave 27 specific molecular markers. A. sinica is a species distinct from the other Old World bisexual species.
Article
Two Artemia populations, a bisexual from San Francisco Bay (California, USA) and a parthenogenetic from Tanggu area (Tianjin province, People's Republic of China) are assayed for their tolerance and fitness in various salinity levels. This study was carried out under laboratory conditions where salinity effects upon special characteristics of the two Artemia populations, such as survival, growth rate, maturation, morphology, fecundity and life duration, were recorded. This evaluation revealed that the two populations examined exhibits significant differences in their response against elevated salinity levels. Furthermore, specific biometric parameters can be a useful tool for the discrimination and/or determination of their distribution in a mixed population, which, in fact, is the case in Tanggu salt works. Artemia franciscana seems to be a more effective colonizer at higher salinities. The data presented in this study may generate useful suggestions for proper management of the solar saltworks at Tanggu although further experimentation is needed.
  • T J Abatzopoulos
  • N El-Bermawi
  • C Vasdekis
Abatzopoulos TJ, El-Bermawi N, Vasdekis C, Baxevanis Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology,2002:267:107-119.
First record of the invasive American Artemia francixscana Kellogg, 1906 (Crustacea: Anostraca) at the South China Sea coast of China. Crustacean
  • Shen Ch
  • Liu Ch
  • X Wu
  • L Yao
  • X Meng
  • L Xia
Shen Ch, Liu Ch, Wu X, Yao L, Meng X, Xia L et al. First record of the invasive American Artemia francixscana Kellogg, 1906 (Crustacea: Anostraca) at the South China Sea coast of China. Crustacean, 2021. 10.1163/15685403-bja10113.