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Virtual Gemba Analytics for Experiential Learning

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Abstract

When developing a project, input from stakeholders is a key to success. In this paper, a Virtual Gemba Walk dashboard for virtual capstone projects is proposed. A Virtual Gemba Walk aligns the expectations of the three stakeholders: student, teacher and industry sponsor through a real-time analytics dashboard that visualizes project indicators, tracks progress and identifies misaligned expectations. This poster presents a proposed interactive dashboard, that leverages data from technology to support the Virtual Gemba Walk process. The dashboard contains key indicators of the capstone project, triggers new Gemba Walks and visualizes feedback from each stakeholders’ perspective. The aim is to help students, teachers and industry sponsors to get meaningful feedback for a better chance of project success.
Companion Proceedings 11th International Conference on Learning Analytics & Knowledge (LAK21)
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Virtual Gemba Analytics for Experiential Learning
Fabiana Santos, Alice Mello, Nikki James
Northeastern University
santos.fa@northeastern.edu, a.mello@northeastern.edu, ni.james@northeastern.edu
ABSTRACT: When developing a project, input from stakeholders is a key to success. In this
paper, a Virtual Gemba Walk dashboard for virtual capstone projects is proposed. A Virtual
Gemba Walk aligns the expectations of the three stakeholders: student, teacher and industry
sponsor through a real-time analytics dashboard that visualizes project indicators, tracks
progress and identifies misaligned expectations. This poster presents a proposed interactive
dashboard, that leverages data from technology to support the Virtual Gemba Walk process.
The dashboard contains key indicators of the capstone project, triggers new Gemba Walks and
visualizes feedback from each stakeholdersperspective. The aim is to help students, teachers
and industry sponsors to get meaningful feedback for a better chance of project success.
Keywords: Gemba Analytics, Learning Analytics, Stakeholders, Experiential Learning
1
INTRODUCTION
A capstone project is a model of experiential learning that brings real-world projects and sponsors into
an academic classroom. A capstone project is a complex pedagogical practice to facilitate, online and
remote learning paradigms make it even more complex. This poster showcases how learning analytics
can be used to align stakeholders. This alignment is achieved by visualizing issues, combining learning
activities with indicators of project management, development and success (Reynolds, 2009). Learning
Management Systems (LMS) are traditionally a two-way channel between teachers and students but in
an industry engaged, experiential learning program like a virtual capstone project, including the
industry sponsor in the virtual learning environment is key. Practera, an experiential learning
technology designed to support teacher, student and industry sponsor collaboration (James et al., 2020)
captures unique data that can be used to implement the Virtual Gemba Walk process.
Gemba has roots in the Japanese culture and means ‘the real place’, which in Lean methodology was
applied as the place of work where value is created (Petruska, 2018). The Gemba walk is a method used
to engage and showcase the current state of a project to leaders, stakeholders, and clients. The
proposed Virtual Gemba Walk is a learning analytics driven presentation made by a student team
highlighting key project indicators including, project progress and key deliverables.
This poster presents a proposed learning analytics driven Virtual Gemba Walk dashboard prototyped
using teacher, student and industry sponsor collaboration data from an experiential learning
technology. The Virtual Gemba Walk dashboard supports a remote capstone project team to visualize
their progress for teachers and industry sponsors. Additionally, through the Virtual Gemba Walk
dashboard Sponsors can identify potential project improvements, flag issues or request further
feedback.
2
VIRTUAL GEMBA WALK EXPLAINED
2.1 Data Used
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To create the dashboard, the data was acquired from the experiential learning technology. The platform
captures data points related to the student use, behavior and completion of project tasks. The student
engagement metrics captured include number of project tasks completed, learning content completion,
project deliverable submissions, team communications, achievement of badges and points to recognize
project performance. Moreover, the technology also captures teacher’s interventions, industry sponsor
feedback and perspectives on the studentsproject engagement and project progress. Those indicators
were analyzed and used as Key Performance Indicators (KPI) in the Virtual Gemba Walk dashboard.
In addition to the existing data captured by the experiential learning platform, a new data set is proposed
to add valuable insight to the Virtual Gemba Walk process. Finally, the Virtual Gemba Walk itself
generates feedback that contains a flag indicator based on the status of the project from the perspective
of the industry partners, students and teachers and written feedback.
2.2 Purpose
As mentioned previously, a traditional Gemba Walk is a process in which a stakeholder would meet
with a team to view the status of the project. In a Virtual Gemba Walk, the industry partner can trigger
it manually at any time to assess, evaluate and provide feedback on the project progress. The key
purpose of a Virtual Gemba Walk is not only to get effective feedback from the industry Sponsors, but
to build trust and develop more effective teams (Gasevic, Dawson & Siemens, 2016).
2.3 Goals & Objectives
The main goal of a capstone project is for students to successfully apply concepts they have learned in
the classroom to a real-world project. This is the key factor that can be analyzed, predicted and
visualized using a learning analytics driven Virtual Gemba Walk dashboard. However, there are
additional factors like work habits, teamwork skills and project quality that are difficult to map using
existing data from the technology (Scholes, 2016). The additional feedback provided by students,
industry sponsors and teachers during the Virtual Gemba Walk process can provide this additional data
not captured by the platform itself.
The overall objective of the Virtual Gemba Walk is student success. In a capstone project this includes
processes and indicators that are not just related to learning (Verner, Evanco & Cerpa, 2007). The
analysis that produces the Virtual Gemba Walk dashboard uses student success as the focal point.
Specifically, it used in a regression model to understand how other variables might affect the level of
student success. The regression analysis is done by taking into consideration the correlation between
variables and the normalized impact that each variable has on the target variable, student success. The
multiple regression is built using the measurements from the student usage of the experiential learning
technology, and the results will be used to define the KPI’s displayed on the dashboard.
2.4 Visualization
The dashboard is divided into three cards. The first contains indicators about individual students, the
second is about the team, and the third is a visualization based on the regression analysis (See Figure
1). The first shows individual indicators including submissions, assessments and achievements. The
second shows team indicators including team submissions, assessments and achievements. The third is
based on Industry Sponsor feedback and the regression analysis. partner) regarding the final Virtual
Gemba walk.
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The students can view their own indicators and their team’s. The educator and industry partner can
choose which team and student they want to visualize.
Figure 1: Virtual Gemba Analytics Dashboard for Experiential Learning
3
CONCLUSION
The purpose of the Virtual Gemba Walk is to improve students’ success in experiential learning
project. With the Virtual Gemba Walk, students will get a more real professional experience as they
are presenting to and receiving feedback from the industry partner often. Additionally, the Industry
sponsor will have a greater understanding of the project development, giving them more confidence
in the success of the project.
4
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under award DUE-1725941. However, any
opinions, findings, conclusions, and/or recommendations are those of the investigators and do not
necessarily reflect the views of the Foundation.
5
REFERENCES
Gasevic, D., Dawson, S., & Siemens, G. (2014). Let’s not forget: Learning analytics are about
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James, N., Humez, A., & Laufenburg P. (2020). Technology to Scaffold Experiential Learning. TechTrends,
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Petruska, R. (2018). Gemba Walks for Service Excellence. Productivity Press.
Reynolds, M. (2009). Wild FrontiersReflections on Experiential Learning. Management Learning, 40(4),
387-392. doi:10.1177/1350507609335848
Scholes, V. (2016). The ethics of using learning analytics to categorize students on risk. Educational
Technology Research and Development, 64(5), 939-955. doi:10.1007/s11423-016-9458-1
Verner, J., Evanco, W., & Cerpa, N. (2007). State of the practice: An exploratory analysis of schedule
estimation and software project success prediction. Information and Software Technology,
49(2), 181-193. doi:10.1016/j.infsof.2006.05.001
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  • N James
  • A Humez
  • P Laufenburg
James, N., Humez, A., & Laufenburg P. (2020). Technology to Scaffold Experiential Learning. TechTrends, 64, 636-645.