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Reliability Analysis of an Evaluation Experiment on Cultural Websites

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Abstract

This paper describes the evaluation experiment of the websites of museums’ conservation labs. For this purpose an experiment has been implemented with the participation of 81 subjects and a multi-criteria decision-making model has been used for processing the results and draw conclusions about the electronic presence of the conservation labs of museums. However, the main focus of the paper is on performing a reliability analysis of the whole experiment. This analysis involved two tests, one for examining the reliability of the sample used in the evaluation experiment and another for examining the reliability of the questionnaire provided to the subjects of the evaluation.

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  • A Martinis
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  • K Kabassi
Martinis, A., Papadatou, A., Kabassi, K.: An Analysis of the Electronic Presence of National Parks in Greece, Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on "Innovative Approaches to Tourism and Leisure: Culture, Places and Narratives in a Sustainability Context", Athens, Greece, 2018, June 28-30.
The Analytic Hierarchy Process
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Saaty, T. The analytic hierarchy process. New York, McGraw-Hill 1980..