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Hackathons en ville, innovations pour la ville ?

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... Il s'inscrirait au contraire dans de nombreux contextes, voire des contextes inter-organisationnels. Un des principaux enjeux des ECI porte sur l'adéquation du design des ECI en fonction des objectifs souhaités en termes d'innovation Ferchaud, 2021). ...
... Ces événements se déclinent de différentes façons selon les organisateurs, les types de participants, la durée, ou les objectifs. Citons quelques exemples : un groupe de protection sociale qui organise un concours interne d'innovation (Allam-Firley, 2018) ; un incubateur qui organise un Start-up Weekend à destination des porteurs de projet incubés (Arreola, Tran, 2018) ; une collectivité qui organise une start-up weekend pour faire participer des citoyens sur des projets de développement territorial urbain (Lesage, Geoffroy, 2018 ;Ferchaud, 2021) ; des collectivités qui organisent des civic hackathon comme concours pour des citoyens pour résoudre des problématiques numériques d'intérêt général (Pogačar, Žižek, 2016) ; une université qui organise un hackathon comme innovation pédagogique pour la formation des étudiants (Gréselle-Zaïbet, et al., 2018) (Ferchaud, 2021, pp. 102-103). ...
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