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The SOLENE-Microclimat Model: Potentiality for Comfort and Energy Studies

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Abstract

The SOLENE-microclimat model has been developed to investigate the consequences of urban context on local microclimate and indoor thermal conditions. It is dedicated to modeling urban microclimate and building thermal behavior at the district scale. The modeling approach is based on the coupling of several modules: radiative, thermal, and CFD models. The model can simulate a large range of cases encountered in urban projects: modeling of vegetation, water ponds, soils, building energy simulation, and techniques such as cool paints and surface water aspersion. It offers a way for enhancing the knowledge and constitutes a decision-making support system for establishing effective urban environmental policies. For each module included in SOLENE-microclimat, the validation steps that have been carried out to check the model’s ability to accurately represent phenomena are presented. Two case studies are presented to show how this tool has been used to assess and compare climate adaptation measures based on vegetation (trees, lawns, green walls, and roofs), water use (aspersion), and cool materials. The advantage of SOLENE-microclimat is its ability to model all the fluxes at both the building and the district scales. This helps in understanding the direct and indirect effects of various adaptation measures and their relative impact on building energy demand and indoor/outdoor thermal comfort.

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Thesis
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  • A Rodler
  • M Musy
  • B Morille
  • S Guernouti
Modélisation de la végétation urbaine et stratégies d’adaptation pour l’amélioration du confort climatique et de la demande énergétique en ville
  • C De Munck
Etude de l’interaction entre le bâtiment et son environnement urbain: Influence sur les conditions de confort en espaces extérieurs
  • M Robitu
Évaluation des impacts directs et indirects des façades et des toitures végétales sur le comportement thermique des bâtiments
  • L Malys
Contribution à la modélisation thermo-aéraulique du microclimat urbain
  • J Vinet