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Lessons learned from using art forms for the representation of local climate information

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We conducted 5 locally-based Arts and Sciences processes, working closely with local stakeholders, artists, scientists and inhabitants in order to propose for each site a conjoint art–science analysis through shared engagement in the interpretation and representations of the various steps conducted within WPs 1, 2 and 3. We present here the theoretical roots, local processes and shared learning, with the art forms as an integral part of the climate services co-construction. The 3 main purposes of the D 4.4 document are: • Remember CoCLiServ shared challenges related with art–science conjoint analysis and share our theoretical approach; • Make explicit the site by site processes associated with the art–science conjoint analysis; • Establish what we consider to be the key points for ongoing and upcoming art–science approaches in the context of climate services.
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Gegenstand dieser Arbeit sind die Arbeiten zweier verschiedener, gleichwohl verwandter Disziplinen zum gleichen Untersuchungsgebiet - der Schweizer Volkskunde und der amerikanischen "cultural anthropology" zum Schweizer Alpenraum.