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Correction to: A “Silent Revolution”: school reforms and Italy’s educational gender gap in the Liberal Age (1861–1921)

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A correction to this paper to make it open access has been published: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11698-021-00227-4
Vol.:(0123456789)
Cliometrica (2021) 15:787–788
https://doi.org/10.1007/s11698-021-00227-4
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CORRECTION
Correction to: A“Silent Revolution”: school reforms
andItaly’s educational gender gap intheLiberal Age
(1861–1921)
GabrieleCappelli1 · MichelangeloVasta1
Published online: 23 March 2021
© The Author(s) 2021
Correction to: Cliometrica (2021) 15:203–229
https:// doi. org/ 10. 1007/ s11698- 020- 00201-6
The article “A “Silent Revolution”: school reforms and Italy’s educational gender
gap in the Liberal Age (1861–1921)”, written by Gabriele Cappelli and Michelan-
gelo Vasta, was originally published Online First without Open Access. After pub-
lication in volume 15, issue 1, pages 203–229 the author decided to opt for Open
Choice and to make the article an Open Access publication. Therefore, the copyright
of the article has been changed to © The Author(s) 2021, and the article is forthwith
distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution, and reproduction in any
medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and
the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes
were made. The images or other third-party materials in this article are included in
the article’s Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to
the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons licence and
your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted
use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a
copy of this licence, visit http:// creat iveco mmons. org/ licen ses/ by/4. 0/.
The original article has been updated.
The original article can be found online at https:// doi. org/ 10. 1007/ s11698- 020- 00201-6.
* Gabriele Cappelli
gabriele.cappelli@unisi.it
Michelangelo Vasta
michelangelo.vasta@unisi.it
1 Department ofEconomics andStatistics, University ofSiena, Siena, Italy
Content courtesy of Springer Nature, terms of use apply. Rights reserved.
788
G.Cappelli, M.Vasta
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Article
This paper studies the impact of legislative size on public spending on education, in a context of restricted suffrage. In 1860s Italy, male teachers were pivotal voters and were directly hired and fired by the local council. As a consequence, local legislators gained large political payoffs from public spending on education. Using a regression discontinuity design, I find that townships that were quasi-randomly assigned a larger council spent more on primary education by 6% of a standard deviation per additional councilman. Consistent with a pork-barrel mechanism, the legislative size effect on spending is driven by a surge in the appointment of male teachers, while female teachers, ineligible to vote, were not affected by legislative size. Higher school spending is associated with higher public education supply and a larger student population.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.