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The Experience of Trauma Center-Trauma Sensitive Yoga Training on Professional Practice of Mental Health Professionals and Yoga Instructors

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Abstract

Background and Purpose Traumatic psychological events are thought to alter brain physiology, notably regions such as the thalamus and the limbic system, affecting personal choice, autonomy, and behavior. Innovative therapies are needed to address the diverse, mental and physical consequences of these changes. Trauma Centre–Trauma Sensitive Yoga (TC-TSY) has shown promising results in clinical trials among individuals experiencing posttraumatic symptomatology. Materials and Methods Using a qualitative, descriptive design, we examined the impact of TC-TSY training on the professional practice of seven practitioners who were certified yoga instructors and/or registered psychologists. Results The findings suggest TC-TSY training enriched their practices, chiefly through its choice-based, widely applicable approach; invitation- and mindfulness-based language; and building of therapeutic trust and attunement. Some participants questioned the accessibility and suitability of the training, as well as the rigidity of TC-TSY terminology. Conclusion More research is needed to examine potential outcomes of TC-TSY practice related to self-efficacy, coping, quality of life, and stress reduction among traumatized individuals.

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