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Ferrocell and Magnetic Patterns - Illustrations of Concepts, Experiments and Demonstrations

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Our goal is to write a book, or an essay, that shows our personal experience with the use of Ferrocell, a magneto-optical device. The use of Ferrocell, also known as Ferrolens, is a way to encourage the study of magneto-optics in a more intuitive way. Ferrocell is a device based on a thin film of nanoparticles, which when subjected to a magnetic field, can interact the light propagation.
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