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Why does uncertainty come in quantum mechanics?

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In 1927 Heisenberg has invented the uncertainty principle. The principle of uncertainty is, "It is impossible to determine the position and momentum of a particle at the same time."The more accurately the momentum is measured, the more uncertain the position will be. Just knowing the position would make the momentum uncertain. Einstein was adamant against this principle until his death. He thought that particles have some secret rules. Einstein thought, "The uncertainty principle is incomplete. There is a mistake somewhere that has resulted in uncertainty. Many did not accept Einstein then. But I'm sure Einstein was right then, there are secret rules for particles. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle is also 100% correct . I recently published a research paper named "Quantum Certainty Mechanics"[1], which shows the principle of measuring the momentum and position of particles by the quantum certainty principle. Why uncertainty comes from certainty is the main topic of this research paper. When the value of the energy absorbed by the electron in the laboratory is calculated, the uncertainty is removed. The details are discussed below.
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Why does uncertainty come in quantum mechanics?
Muhammad Yasin
Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh
E-mail:md.yasin@ymcontents.com
1 Abstract: In 1927 Heisenberg has invented the uncertainty principle. The principle of
uncertainty is, "It is impossible to determine the position and momentum of a particle at the same
time."The more accurately the momentum is measured, the more uncertain the position will be.
Just knowing the position would make the momentum uncertain. Einstein was adamant against
this principle until his death. He thought that particles have some secret rules. Einstein thought,
"The uncertainty principle is incomplete. There is a mistake somewhere that has resulted in
uncertainty. Many did not accept Einstein then. But I'm sure Einstein was right then, there are
secret rules for particles. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle is also 100% correct . I recently
published a research paper named "Quantum Certainty Mechanics"[1], which shows the principle
of measuring the momentum and position of particles by the quantum certainty principle. Why
uncertainty comes from certainty is the main topic of this research paper. When the value of the
energy absorbed by the electron in the laboratory is calculated, the uncertainty is removed. The
details are discussed below.
2 Keywords: quantum mechanics; uncertainty principle; certainty mechanics ; quantum
measurement
3 Introduction: Basically I have tried to show in two ways, why uncertainty comes .When the
particle moves with the momentum p, the wave involved with the particle is revealed. Due to the
p-momentum of the particle, the distance between the particle and the wave associated with the
particle is θ> 0 and then the detection of the particle inside the wave leads to uncertainty. If the
distance between the particle and the involved wave due to the p momentum of the particle is
θ=0 , then there would be no uncertainty. But the reality is that as the particle moves with
momentum p , there is always θ> 0 between the particle and the wave associated with the
particle, so there is uncertainty.
It is possible to analyze the matter in another way. When we go to observe a particle in the
laboratory, the position of the particle changes due to the effect of the energy of the photon or the
energy of another instrument on the electron and gains kinetic energy. Calculating how much
energy has been applied while observing the particle in the laboratory will reduce the
uncertainty. To avoid uncertainty when measuring the position and momentum of a particle, we
need to measure how much energy has been absorbed from photon by the electron to make the
total energy E. If the total energy E of a photon can be measured with certainty then the position
and momentum of the particle can be measured with certainty. This article will show that the
uncertainty principle can be proved from the principle of certainty by diffraction test and the
uncertainty principle comes when the distance between the particle and the wave involved is 6>
0 due to the p momentum of the particle.
4 Method: The recently published article entitled "Quantum Certainty Mechanics" shows that it
is possible to prove the principle of certainty (xp = hft ) separately from the theory of relativity,
quantum mechanics, Newton's mechanics (maintaining the principle of relativity) and
Heisenberg's law of uncertainty. Here x is the position, p is the momentum, f is the frequency of
the waves involved due to the p momentum of the particle and t is the time. Basically this
equation explains why uncertainty comes. The reasons for the uncertainty have been shown in
two ways.
4.1 Mathematical proof of the principle uncertainty from the principle certainty:
." Now I will tell you why uncertainty comes. Suppose a snake is running in the river. At that
time waves are created in the river. Now if I find the snake inside the wave then the position of
the snake will be uncertain. But if we consider finding snakes in the waveless river, there will be
no uncertainty. A particle is moving. Waves are created or waves are involved because of the
motion of the particles. The waves are like beautiful sine waves. Like a snake, we will look for
the particle inside the wave, that is, inside the sine function.
The wave is , (1)
Now the principle of certainty is,
xp = hft
xp = h
2

therefore,

(2)
From equations (1) and (2) we get;
sin xp
(3)
Figure 1: An electron at the main point and the wave created due to the momentum of the
electron are depicted.
The value of the wave is, 1sin(t) 1
That is,
  0
xp
0
So hold the distance =t
2 between the electron and the wave at the original point and
get from equation (2),
xp
2
xp
2 × h
2
xp h
4
therefore,
xp h
4 (4)
Equation 4 indicates uncertainty. I said a while ago that the principle of certainty is correct.
Again I am saying, if the certainty is correct, then the principle of uncertainty is also correct.
In fact, the reason for the uncertainty is that I found the electron in sin (θ) at θ≥π/2. That is, when
I look for electrons inside the wave, uncertainty will come. If we continue to reduce the value of
θ , then the value of uncertainty will continue to decrease. In this way uncertainty can be
removed. If the value of θ reduces to 0 , that is, if the distance between the electron and the
wave created by the electron is θ = 0 then there is nothing to say about uncertainty. What is
uncertainty? Is it very important to stay?
Can't it be omitted in any way? What is the role of the certainty from which the uncertainty
came? Will we not get rid of uncertainty in any way?
For this answer we assume Dolphins are running in the sea. For convenience, there is no wave in
the sea.
Now when dolphins run, they create waves. The size of each wave is equal to 10 to 20 floors
(imagine, there is nothing wrong with imagining!). Now the dolphin is running through waves
equal to 10 to 20 floors. I don't understand where the dolphins are. Now you have to look at the
sea waves to identify the dolphins. Then we can say that the bigger the wave, the more likely it is
that there will be dolphins. When we can't identify the dolphin, instead we go to identify the
dolphin by the waves, then the dolphins are everywhere in the waves of the ocean. Just then the
uncertainty will come. Similarly, when we cannot identify the electron, when we go to determine
the position of the electron through the created (involved) wave due to the movement of the
electron, then uncertainty will come. Whether it's finding the dolphin in the waves of the ocean
or finding the electron in the waves created with it. The dolphin or the electron is in a certain
position but the waves created with it can be in any position. Just then uncertainty shifts from
certainty. And if we do not want to bring uncertainty, then the distance between the electron and
the created (involved) wave with the electron must be calculated as θ = 0. Then there will be no
uncertainty
.
I have done a little trick in implementing the principle of uncertainty from the principle of
certainty.
 
Here we have calculated holding. xp
2
We have calculated from the highest peak in the figure i.e. θ =
2 but we should have calculated
from θ = 0° first.
Let's calculate the beginning with θ = 0.
I have said before that if you reduce θ, the value of uncertainty will continue to decrease. So
what will happen now?
Suppose the distance between an electron and a wave created with an electron is θ = 0°.

0
  0 (5)
There is no further uncertainty in Equation 5.In fact, uncertainty comes when we calculate the
value θ = π / 2, but if you calculate the value θ = 0 then there is no uncertainty. In the universe,
when an object moves with p-momentum, its matter-wave properties are revealed. There is
always θ = π / 2 between these waves and particles which leads to uncertainty.
If θ=0 ° existed between the particle and the wave associated with the particle, then the
uncertainty principle would not work.
4.2 Mathematical proof of the principle uncertainty from the principle certainty
(fundamental equation)
Let's find out the general equation of the relationship between the principle of certainty and the
principle of uncertainty.
Notice the figure above which is the graph for sin (θ).Here
r
d .
sin(t)=
(6)
Now we know, xp
. So we get from equation 48
sin xp
= r
d
xp
= sin1(r
d) (7)
Now if we assure the momentum p then the uncertainty of position from the equation 7 will be ,

p sin1(r
d) (8)
The reason for the uncertainty is that if the distance between the electrons and the waves
associated with the electrons (created waves) is calculated more, the uncertainty comes. Whether
the uncertainty will be more or less will depend on the following equation.
 sin1(r
d) (9)
The mystery of whether uncertainty will increase or decrease is hidden in this equation 9.
I already told why the uncertainty come.
Let's take a look at the relationship between the principle of uncertainty and the principle of
certainty according to Broglie's particle-wave duality.
If we are sure of ∆x then we do not know what will be λ. Then according to the =
formula ∆x
is sure but the momentum ∆p is uncertain.
Now λ confirmation means that according to the formula the momentum p is certain but
∆x is then uncertain. Then what is the matter!
We have seen from the principle of certainty that if it is θ≥
2 then uncertainty comes. Which
means I've been trying to find the electrons inside the waves. λ Confirmation in the Broglie's
formula and θ≥
2 in the principle of certainty is the same thing. Then this is the background
behind the coming of uncertainty.
4.3 The proof of uncertainty from the principle of certainty through deflection:
With the help of the electron deflection system it is possible to prove the principle of uncertainty.
The figure above, where a beam of an electron of v0 velocity is falling on a screen A with a hole
of ∆x thickness from the left side. In this case the process of deflection will occur due to the
wave nature associated with the electron and hence the deflection pattern will be created in
screen B placed parallel to it. Suppose the value of the perpendicular (x) component vx of the
velocity of the electron emitted from the hole at point N on the screen B is VxN , which in this
case indicates the uncertainty of velocity , i.e. VxN = ∆vx .Now you can write from the figure.
(
)
=( )
()
=( )
()
  =
(10)
(Because, if θ is small then tan(θ) θ )
Now we get multiplied by mc on both sides,
=mc
vo×mc
=E
E (11)
Now according to the principle of certainty, ∆x∆p=hft
xp = hft
xp = h
22ft
xp =  [2ft=]
=xp
(12)
Now we get from Equation 11 and Equation 12,
E
E = xp
E
E (13)
In equation no 13, the nature of the uncertainty will depend on ∆E / E . E is the total energy of
the electron, the static energy and the total energy due to the impact of the photon. ∆E is the
erroneous value of measuring E. ∆E=E when the energy of the electron is measured in a 0%
certain way i.e. 100% uncertain energy ∆E is measured . Then the momentum and position are
100% uncertain. Again, if we measure the energy of the electron accurately, that is, if we
measure it 100% surely, 0% will be uncertain, that is, ∆E = 0.Then the uncertainty of momentum
and position will be 0% i.e. ∆x∆p = 0.
Which means that if the value of energy uncertainty ∆E increases to ∆E = E then ∆x∆p will be
completely uncertain. If we can accurately measure the energy of an electron, then the
uncertainty of the value of ∆x∆p will continue to decrease. The uncertainty of the energy of the
electron at point N in the figure above is ∆E. So the uncertainty of momentum and position exists
.When we do experiment to see electrons, the energy of electrons increases under the influence
of laboratory instruments. But we do not calculate the value of ∆E. Whereby the value of ∆E is
equal to the completely uncertain total energy E .Then the uncertainty of ∆x∆p arises.
5 Decision: Uncertainty arises when the momentum and position of a particle are measured
simultaneously. The main reason for the uncertainty is our observation effect. Uncertainty arises
when the distance between the particle and waves created due to the p momentum of the
particle is θ>0 .If the distance between the particle and the wave caused by the p-momentum of
the particle were θ = 0, there would be no uncertainty. According to the experimental results, the
total energy (∆E) of the particle at any point is uncertain when observing the particle in the
laboratory, As a result ∆x∆p at that point becomes uncertain. If we determine the total energy E
of the particle in the laboratory, then there will be no uncertainty. Einstein has been against the
principle of uncertainty all his life since 1927, according to him there is a secret rule. This article
reveals that secret rule.
6 Conclusion: The uncertainty principle is completely correct. The main purpose of this article
is to show how the principle of uncertainty comes from the principle of certainty. Einstein's
claim was correct that day, there is a reason behind the uncertainty principle. How or why the
uncertainty principle comes can be known for sure from the principle of certainty .
7 Reference
[1] Yasin ,M . Quantum Certainty Mechanics (2021) osf.oi
[2] Ozawa, M: Heisenberg's Original Derivation of the Uncertainty Principle and its Universally
Valid Reformulations (2015).arXiv:1507.02010
[3] Busch , P: Heisenberg's uncertainty principle (2007). arXiv:quant-ph/0609185v3
[4] W. Heisenberg, Remarks on the origin of the relations of uncertainty, in: W. Price, S.
Chissick(Eds.), The Uncertainty Principle and Foundations of Quantum Mechanics. A Fifty
Years’Survey, J. Wiley & Sons, London, 1977, pp. 3–6 .
[5] W. Heisenberg, Uber den anschaulichen Inhalt der quantentheoretischen Ki ¨ nematik und
Mechanik, Z. Phys. 43 (1927) 172198.
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and beyond, Phys. Rep. 435 (2006) 131.
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spectrumVerhandlungen der Deutschen Physikalischen Gesellschaft2, 23745,English
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[13] Ozawa, M: Heisenberg's Original Derivation of the Uncertainty Principle and its
Universally Valid Reformulations (2015).arXiv:1507.02010
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disturbance relationships with weak values. New J. Phys. 12,
093011 (2010).
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ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
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Heisenberg's uncertainty principle is usually taken to express a limitation of operational possibilities imposed by quantum mechanics. Here we demonstrate that the full content of this principle also includes its positive role as a condition ensuring that mutually exclusive experimental options can be reconciled if an appropriate trade-off is accepted. The uncertainty principle is shown to appear in three manifestations, in the form of uncertainty relations: for the widths of the position and momentum distributions in any quantum state; for the inaccuracies of any joint measurement of these quantities; and for the inaccuracy of a measurement of one of the quantities and the ensuing disturbance in the distribution of the other quantity. Whilst conceptually distinct, these three kinds of uncertainty relations are shown to be closely related formally. Finally, we survey models and experimental implementations of joint measurements of position and momentum and comment briefly on the status of experimental tests of the uncertainty principle. (c) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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Quantum Certainty Mechanics (2021) osf.oi
  • M Yasin
Yasin,M. Quantum Certainty Mechanics (2021) osf.oi
Heisenberg's Original Derivation of the Uncertainty Principle and its Universally Valid Reformulations
  • M Ozawa
Ozawa, M: Heisenberg's Original Derivation of the Uncertainty Principle and its Universally Valid Reformulations (2015).arXiv:1507.02010
The Uncertainty Principle and Foundations of Quantum Mechanics. A Fifty Years'Survey
  • W Heisenberg
W. Heisenberg, Remarks on the origin of the relations of uncertainty, in: W. Price, S. Chissick(Eds.), The Uncertainty Principle and Foundations of Quantum Mechanics. A Fifty Years'Survey, J. Wiley & Sons, London, 1977, pp. 3-6.
  • M Planck
Planck M 1900 Zur Theorie des Gesetzes der Energieverteilung im Normal-spectrumVerhandlungen der Deutschen Physikalischen Gesellschaft2, 237-45,English translation by D. ter Haar 1967The Old Quantum Theory(PergamonPress]: