ArticlePDF Available

How Many km2 of Solar Panels in Spain and how much battery backup would it take to power Germany

Authors:

Abstract

- English and German Versions are included in the same PDF. Die Deutsche Version ist im gleichen PDF ab Seite 7 enthalten - Germany is responsible for about 2% of global annual CO2 emissions from energy. To match Germany’s electricity demand (or over 15% of EU’s electricity demand) solely from solar photovoltaic panels located in Spain, about 7% of Spain would have to be covered with solar panels (~35.000 km2). Spain is the best-situated country in Europe for solar power, better in fact than India or (South) East Asia. The required Spanish solar park (PV-Spain) will have a total installed capacity of 2.000 GWp or almost 3x the 2020 installed solar capacity worldwide of 715 GW. In addition, backup storage capacity totaling about 45 TWh would be required. To produce sufficient storage capacity from batteries using today’s leading technology would require the full output of 900 Tesla Gigafactories working at full capacity for one year, not counting the replacement of batteries every 20 years. For the entire European Union’s electricity demand, 6 times as much – about 40 % of Spain (~200.000 km2) – would be required, coupled with a battery capacity 6x higher. To keep the Solar Park functioning just for Germany, PV panels would need to be replaced every 15 years, translating to an annual silicon requirement for the panels reaching close to 10% of current global production capacity (~135% for one-time setup). The silver requirement for modern PV panels powering Germany would translate to 30% of the annual global silver production (~450% for one-time setup). For the EU, essentially the entire annual global silicon production and 3x the annual global silver production would be required for replacement only. There are currently not enough raw materials available for a battery backup. A 14-day battery storage solution for Germany would exceed the 2020 global battery production by a factor of 4 to 5x. To produce the required batteries for Germany alone (or over 15% of EU’s electricity demand) would require mining, transportation and processing of 0,4-0,8 billion tons of raw materials every year (7 to 13 billion tons for one-time setup), and 6x more for Europe. The raw materials required include lithium, copper, cobalt, nickel, graphite, rare earths & bauxite, coal, and iron ore for aluminum and steel. The 2020 global production of lithium, graphite anodes, cobalt or nickel would not nearly suffice by a multiple factor to produce the batteries for Germany alone. -- DEUTSCH Deutschland ist für etwa 2% der weltweiten energiebedingten CO2-Emissionen verantwortlich. Um Deutschlands Strombedarf (oder etwas mehr als 15% des EU-Strombedarfs) allein durch in Spanien installierte PV-Anlagen decken zu können, müssten etwa 7% der Fläche Spaniens mit Solarmodulen bebaut werden (~35.000 km2). Spanien ist das in Europa am günstigsten gelegene Land für Solarenergie. Tatsächlich ist Spanien viel besser für Solarenergie geeignet als Indien oder (Südost)Asien. Der spanische Solarpark („PV-Spanien“) müsste eine installierte Gesamtkapazität von 2.000 GWp oder knapp das Dreifache der 2020 weltweit installierten Kapazität von 715 GW vorhalten. Darüber hinaus würde eine Batterie-Speicherkapazität von insgesamt etwa 45 TWh benötigt. Die Herstellung einer solchen Speicherkapazität bei Verwendung der heute führenden Technologie würde den jährlichen Gesamtoutput von 900 Tesla Gigafactories bei voller Kapazität erfordern. Dabei wurde nicht berücksichtigt, dass die Batterien spätestens alle 20 Jahre ersetzt werden müssen. Für den gesamten europäischen Strombedarf würden sechsmal so viel, als etwa 40% der Fläche Spaniens (~200.000 km2) sowie eine sechsmal höhere Batteriekapazität benötigt. Allein für die Stromversorgung Deutschlands müssten die Solar-Module des Solarparks etwa alle 15 Jahre ausgetauscht werden. Hierfür wären einmalig ~10 Millionen Tonnen Silizium oder die 1,35-fache Menge der weltweiten Silizium-Jahresproduktion erforderlich und anschließend dauerhaft ~660.000 Tonnen Silizium jährlich oder 9% der jetzigen weltweiten Siliziumproduktion. Zusätzlich entspräche der benötigte Silberbedarf einmalig ~120.000 Tonnen Silber oder die 4,5-fache Menge der weltweiten Silber-Jahresproduktion und anschließend dauerhaft ~8.000 Tonnen Silber jährlich oder ~30% der jetzigen weltweiten Silberproduktion. Zudem stünden auch für die benötigte Batterie-Speicherkapazität nicht genügend Rohstoffe zur Verfügung. Die Herstellung eines 14-Tages-Batterie-Backups für Deutschland würde die weltweite Batterieproduktion des Jahres 2020 um den Faktor 4 bis 5 übersteigen. Um die benötigten Batterien allein für Deutschland (oder für etwas mehr als 15% des EU-Strombedarfs) herstellen zu können, wären jährlich etwa 0,4-0,8 Milliarden Tonnen an Rohstoffen (7 bis 13 Milliarden Tonnen für die Einrichtung des Backups) nötig, die abgebaut, transportiert und verarbeitet werden müssten. Für Europa wäre es die sechsfache Menge an Rohstoffen. Diese umfassen Lithium, Kupfer, Kobalt, Nickel, Grafit, Seltene Erden & Bauxit, Kohle und Eisenerz für Aluminium und Stahl. Um die Batterien nur für Deutschland produzieren zu können, würde die weltweite Gesamtproduktion 2020 von Lithium, Graphit, Kobalt und Nickel um ein Vielfaches nicht ausreichen.
How many km2 of solar panels in Spain
and how much battery backup would it take
to power Germany
1. Abstract
Germany is responsible for about 2% of global annual CO2 emis-
sions from energy. To match Germany’s electricity demand (or over
15% of EU’s electricity demand) solely from solar photovoltaic pan-
els located in Spain, about 7% of Spain would have to be covered
with solar panels (~35.000 km2). Spain is the best-situated country
in Europe for solar power, better in fact than India or (South) East
Asia. The required Spanish solar park (PV-Spain) will have a total
installed capacity of 2.000 GWp or almost 3x the 2020 installed solar
capacity worldwide of 715 GW. In addition, backup storage capacity
totaling about 45 TWh would be required. To produce sucient
storage capacity from batteries using today’s leading technology
would require the full output of 900 Tesla Gigafactories working at
full capacity for one year, not counting the replacement of batteries
every 20 years. For the entire European Union’s electricity demand,
6 times as much – about 40% of Spain (~200.000 km2) – would be
required, coupled with a battery capacity 6x higher.
To keep the Solar Park functioning just for Germany, PV panels
would need to be replaced every 15 years, translating to an annual
silicon requirement for the panels reaching close to 10% of current
global production capacity (~135% for one-time setup). The silver
requirement for modern PV panels powering Germany would
translate to 30% of the annual global silver production (~450% for
one-time setup). For the EU, essentially the entire annual global
silicon production and 3x the annual global silver production would
be required for replacement only.
There are currently not enough raw materials available for a battery
backup. A 14-day battery storage solution for Germany would
exceed the 2020 global battery production by a factor of 4 to 5x. To
produce the required batteries for Germany alone (or over 15% of
EU’s electricity demand) would require mining, transportation and
processing of 0,4-0,8 billion tons of raw materials every year (7 to 13
billion tons for one-time setup), and 6x more for Europe. The raw
materials required include lithium, copper, cobalt, nickel, graphite,
rare earths & bauxite, coal, and iron ore for aluminum and steel.
The 2020 global production of lithium, graphite anodes, cobalt or
nickel would not nearly suce by a multiple factor to produce the
batteries for Germany alone.
It appears that solar’s low energy density, high raw material input and
low energy-Return-On-energy-Invested (eROeI) as well as large storage
requirements make today’s solar technology an environmentally and eco-
nomically unviable choice to replace conventional power at large scale.
Source: Chile’s second largest solar park, 146 megawatt peak (MWp) Bolero Solar PV plant, operated by EDF Renewable
and located in Atacama Desert in the region of Antofagasta; Picture taken by Antonio Garcia, downloaded at this link.
Disclaimer: This is a back-of-the-envelope
calculation based on experience from exist-
ing PV plants in California and publicly
available battery data and insolation data
for Spain. The calculations can be adjusted
using dierent assumptions.
Preface:
Power (in Watts, in German “Leistung”)
is the horsepower of a car’s engine. Energy
to drive a Tesla, for example, is derived
from a battery. A Tesla S half-ton kWh
battery powers a 192 kW electric motor to
accelerate the 2,2-ton Tesla S.
Energy (in Watt-hour or Wh, in German
“Arbeit oder Energie”) is how much work
it takes to move the 2,2-ton car, for in-
stance, for 1h at 100 km/h over a specied
terrain. Energy is equivalent to “work”. In
this case, energy varies with travel time,
velocity, mass, aerodynamics, friction,
and the power applied to overcome those
“obstacles”. The half-ton Tesla S battery
stores energy of 85 to 100 kWh.
Capacity Factor “CF” (in German
“Nutzungsgrad”) is the percentage of
power output achieved from the installed
capacity for a given site, usually stated on
an annual basis.
- Capacity factor is not the eciency fac-
tor. Eciency measures the percentage
of input energy transformed to usable
energy.
- Capacity factor assumes a stable photo-
voltaic response and measures the site
quality, which varies with latitude, air
mass, season, diurnal (24h sun cycle at
that location), and weather.
- In Germany, photovoltaics (“PV”)
achieve an average annual capacity
factor of ~10%, while California reaches
an annual average CF of 25%3. Thus,
California yields 2,5x the output of an
identical PV plant in Germany.
- It is important to distinguish between
the average annual capacity factor and
the monthly or better weekly and daily
capacity factor, which is very relevant
when we try to use solar for our daily
power needs (See Figure 5).
Written by
Dr. Lars Schernikau and
Prof. William H. Smith
Published November 2020,
last updated March 2021
(the authors appreciated all
received feedback leading
to this substantially revised
version).
Publicly available at
Researchgate & SSRN.
About the authors:
Dr. Lars Schernikau is an
energy economist and
entrepreneur in the energy
raw material industry.
Prof. William Hayden Smith
is Professor of Earth and
Planetary Sciences at
McDonnell Center for Space
Sciences at Washington
University, St. Louis, MO,
USA.
DOI: 10.2139/ssrn.3730155
1
2. Introduction and Assumptions
On 3rd July 2020, the German Minister for
the Environment Ms. Svenja Schulze an-
nounced publicly (translated from German)
that “Germany will be the rst country to aban-
don coal and nuclear energy. We will rely com-
pletely on energy derived from solar and wind”.
This statement as well as the IEA’s October
2020 proclamation that solar will become the
“new king of the world’s electricity markets” led
the authors to make the calculations herein.
The goal of this paper is to calculate how
much solar installed capacity in Spain is
needed to supply Germany’s electricity re-
quirement 100% with solar energy produced
in Spain, which equals replacing over 15%
of EU’s electricity demand. We refer to this
Spanish photovoltaic solar park as “PV-
Spain”. Spain is Europe’s best location for
solar power given its high direct normal irra-
diation (DNI, see Figure 1) and in fact, Spain
has signicantly more suitable sunshine
than India or (South) East Asia.
In addition, this paper will calculate the
backup capacity required in the form of
batteries and address the subject of material
input required for both the PV-Spain and the
backup. The subjects of a Solar Park in the
Sahara Desert as well as Hydrogen are also
addressed. The multidimensional calcula-
tions herein demonstrate the complexity of
energy economics, which is largely underes-
timated in the current debate on renewable
energy.
Simplifying assumptions
The authors’ calculations are based on the
following simplifying assumptions which are
on average quite generous. These assump-
tions can be replaced with the readers’ own:
A1. Average Electricity Demand: Germa-
ny has a measured average annual
electrical energy demand of up to ~550
TWh, to simplify we assume ~45 TWh
per month or ~1,5 TWh per day. For
comparison, EU demand is 3.300 TWh
p.a., 6 times larger1.
A2. Peak Power Factor = 1,6x: Germany
has average power demand of ~63 GW
(550 TWh ÷ 8.760h). The actual peak
power demand in the winter reaches
82 GW. Accounting for standard
20% safety margin increases required
capacity for peak power to ~100 GW
(100 ÷ 63 = 1,59).2
Peak demand will likely rise because of
electric vehicles and heat pumps. The
Peak Power Factor adjustment converts
average annual power demand to daily
peak power demand including safety
margin which is signicantly higher
than the average. For comparison, EU
average power demand is ~375 GW, 6
times higher.
A3. Backup Peak Power Factor = 1,5x:
Figure 4 illustrates the typical electricity
demand curve and photovoltaic pro-
duction during a day. The photovoltaic
peak must be approximately twice the
demand peak in order to allow the bat-
teries to charge during the few sunny
hours around noon. Figure 2 also illus-
trates that nearly all power is produced
in only one-quarter of a 24h-period and
nothing at night. The authors generous-
ly assume a Backup Peak Power Factor
of only 1,5x.
A4. DC/AC and Transmission loss = 30%
or 1,3x: DC to AC conversion before
consumption incurs a loss of 21-24%3
of direct current power produced.
Transport of electricity to the German
end user over approximately 1.500 km
(air distance from Toledo to Frankfurt)
will account for approx. 10% loss. Thus,
total ~30% loss or a factor of about 1,3x.
A5. Average annual DNI in Spain located
at 41 ºN latitude is normalized to data
from the largest US solar park called
“Solar Star”3 located in California,
which is well documented.
a. Solar Star is amongst the largest,
most ecient and modern operating
solar parks in the world employing
large form-factor, high-wattage,
high-eciency, higher cost crystal-
line silicon solar panels/modules,
mounted on single axis trackers.
Solar Star produced 1,66 TWh/p.a.
of DC electricity between 2017 and
2019. The park operates 747 MWDC
total installed solar PV capacity
covering 13 km2 using 1,7 million
solar panels3, translating to 57,5 MW
installed capacity per km2.
b. The Direct Normal Irradiation (DNI)
map in Figure 1 accounts for sunny
days in Spain. It adjusts for latitude,
clouds, rain, as well as hours of day
and night.
c. ESP/CA DNI Factor = 1,5: The DNI
for Southern Spain is ~1.900 W/m2/
p.a., while the DNI in Southern CA is
~2.900 W/m2/p.a.4 , a factor of 1,53.
d. Solar panels can be operated for
15 years before they have to be
replaced5.
A6. Winter Capacity Factor = 1,8: The 2017-
2019 average annual capacity factor of
Solar Star in California was measured
at 24,8%3. This translates to 16,5% aver-
age annual capacity factor for Spain.
a. The monthly capacity factors in
California for 2018/2019 varied from
13,3% in December to 33,9% in June
(see Figure 5), leading to a Winter
Capacity Factor adjustment of 1,8x
(24,8% ÷ 13,3% = 1,86).
b. Figure 2 illustrates a typical PV
sunny day output during winter and
summer in Austria. The output var-
ies here by more than 3:1 between
winter and summer.
A7. Gigafactory = 50 GWh Li-ion batteries:
The annual production of a Tesla Giga-
factory is anticipated to reach up to
50 GWh of Li-ion batteries.6
a. Materials required to build today’s
best battery technology include lith-
ium, copper, cobalt, nickel, graphite,
rare earths & bauxite, coal and iron
ore (for aluminum and steel).
b. It is estimated that optimistically
1-2% of actual ore body mined ends
up in the weight of the battery7.
A8. Battery Storage Utilization Factor =
1,7: Li-ion rechargeable batteries can
store energy over several months, and
self-discharge ~5% of stored energy in
rst 24h, and at ~2% per month thereaf-
ter.
a. The eciency of storing charge is 90%.
b. Charging to 80% of capacity and
discharge to 20% of capacity pre-
serves battery life. Internal electronics
maintain optimum internal operating
temperature of 12-16 ºC, optimum
discharge rate near 1C (refers to a dis-
charge rate of 1 Coulomb per second
for one hour)8, and protects batteries
from too high or too low charge or
discharge voltages which damage the
batteries9.
c. Maintenance electronics consume
3% per month of the charge per cell.
Figure 1: Global Direct Normal Irradiation, based on long-term average kWh/m2.
Source: World Bank Group, accessed 4 Sep 2020 at this link.
Long-term average of direct normal irradiation (DNI)
Daily totals
Yearly totals
1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 6.0 7.0 8.0 9.0 10.0
365 730 1095 1461 1826 2191 2556 2922 3287 3652
kWh/m2
2
The diurnal discharge cycle must
be controlled carefully to preserve
battery life out to 7.000 cycles, equiv-
alent to a 20-year lifetime10.
d. As a result, on average 50-60% of in-
stalled battery capacity can be used
eectively, therefore a factor of 1,7x
is assumed.
A9. Not considered by the authors are:
a. Total energy consumption in Germa-
ny, which is ~5x higher than electric-
ity demand (including non-electrical
heating, transportation, etc.).
b. Energy that Germany imports from
other parts of the world because
Germany consumes products that
require energy to build (but they are
built outside of Germany, for instance
in China, India or the US).
c. Alternate means of producing power,
100% solar from Spain is assumed for
Germany which equals to over 15%
of the EU.
d. Alternate means of providing backup
(other than battery backup), such as
any conventional capacity from fos-
sil, nuclear, hydro, or hydrogen. This
assumption illustrates the backup
requirement and focuses on batteries.
Hydrogen is covered in Section 3.4.
e. Total costs, energy required, materi-
als needed or environmental impact
of building transmission lines and
transmission systems, building solar
panels (silicon and silver require-
ments are mentioned, other materials
not). Solar’s energy-Return-On-en-
ergy-Invested (eROeI) is estimated
to be too low to support advanced
societies11.
f. Costs and environmental impact of
recycling or disposing of solar panels
after their useful life. Also not includ-
ed are costs of building, maintain-
ing, and recycling or disposing the
storage capacity which will need to
be replaced every 20 years or sooner
(estimation is given on materials re-
quired for construction of batteries).
g. Cost for land used that includes but
is not limited to animal life de-
stroyed, crop land and forests, towns,
streets, valleys, mountains that
would have to be cut or eliminated
(see Figure 3).
h. The impact of large-scale solar PV
farms on local temperatures in
non-desert environments, which may
have a substantial heating eect.
Sunlight on vegetation (grass, trees)
supports plant growth and plants
support transpirational cooling. On
areas covered with solar panels,
70-90% of absorbed sunlight cannot
be transformed to useful energy nor
can it be absorbed by plants, thus,
warming the surroundings (see Lu et
al. Dec 2020 and Li et al. Sep 201812).
i. Positive side eects such as pro-
ducing green hydrogen with excess
capacity in the summer. Hydrogen is
briey addressed in section 3.4.
3. Calculating the PV-Spain
The goal of this paper is to calculate how
much installed solar capacity in Spain (PV-
Spain) is required to supply 100% of Ger-
many’s electricity requirement which equals
just over 15% of EU’s demand. To accom-
plish this, the PV-Spain installed capacity
has to be sucient during winter months.
During winter, however, solar energy is at
its minimum while consumer demand is the
highest.
3.1. PV-Spain installed capacity and
space requirement
For calculation purposes, the authors use
the well-documented Solar Star3 Project in
California. Solar Star produced on average
1,66 TWh/p.a. of DC electricity or 128 GWh/
km2/p.a. (see A5.a) or 10,67 GWh/km2/
month with 747 MW total and 57,5 MW/
km2 installed capacity. German electricity de-
mand is on average 45 TWh or 45.000 GWh
per month (see A1).
Therefore, it appears at rst sight that month-
ly 45.000 GWh ÷ 10,67 GWh/km2 = 4.220 km2
of solar panels in Spain should be sucient.
However, the following adjustments detailed
above are required:
Adjusting for the Peak Power Factor
of 1,6x (A2),
Adjusting for the Backup Peak Power
Factor of 1,5x (A3)
Adjusting for DC/AC Conversion
and Transmission loss of 30% (A4) or
a factor of 1,3x,
Adjusting California’s higher solar
irradiance to Spain’s lower solar irra-
diance with an ESP/CA DNI Factor of
1,5x (A5.c),
Adjusting the average capacity factor
to the Winter Capacity Factor of 1,8x
(A6).
Total required adjustments are 1,6 x 1,5 x 1,3 x
1,5 x 1,8 = 8,4x. Thus, the total required area
of PV-Spain only for Germany becomes
~35.000 km2 (8,4 x 4.220 km2 = 35.448 km2).
Since solar panels last on average 15 years,
this translates to ~2.300 km2 of new solar
panels to be built every year in perpetuity.
Considering that Solar Star in California
has an installed capacity of 747 MWDC, then
PV-Spain will have a total installed capacity
of 2.000 GW or almost 3 times the 2020
installed solar capacity worldwide of 715
GW13 (35.000 km2 x 57,5 MW/km2 = 2.013
GW). Please note that PV-Spain provides only
for 1/5th of Germany’s total energy demand
and that Germany accounts for 2% of global
anthropogenic energy CO2 emissions not
accounting for methane.
PV-Spain with an area of ~35,000 km2 is
oversized to produce the electrical energy
required for Germany in wintertime. Excess
output is nominally zero in mid-winter and
increases to a maximum in midsummer.
Integrated over a year, generously about
half of PV-Spain is producing excess power,
albeit intermittently, which could be used
for green-hydrogen or for other purposes
such as smelting (see Section 3.4).
The authors would like to point out here
that the area required of PV-Spain may be
reduced substantially if the backup capacity
would be increased by a factor of ten. This
reduction would be possible if such backup –
possibly also in the form of hydrogen –
could store half a year of Germany’s
electricity demand, such that the energy
collected and stored in the summer can
power a part of Germany’s winter demand.
To match the European Union’s electricity
requirements, the above numbers will all
have to be multiplied by six.
3.2. Storage capacity or backup
It is evident that all intermittent forms of
power generation require a backup even if
the sun shines “almost” every day or the
wind blows “almost” every hour. The back-
up has to be such that the resulting power
availability at the consumer is more than 99%
reliable at all times. An economy that cannot
provide reliable power all the time risks
human life and loses its economic relevance
in the global context.
We will make two calculations. A) Calculate
the backup capacity required for one single
day, assuming the sun shines every day in
Spain. B) Calculate the backup for 14 days of
Summer to winter > 3:1
5,0
4,5
4,0
3,5
3,0
2,5
2,0
1,5
1,0
0,5
0,0
Time: GMT+1, no DST
PV Output Power [kW]
Sunny Days
2015-05-11
2015-08-01
2015-11-01
2016-02-06
2015-12-31
21:00
22:00
20:00
19:00
18:00
17:00
16:00
15:00
14:00
13:00
12:00
11:00
10:00
09:00
08:00
07:00
06:00
05:00
04:00
Figure 2: Typical PV output winter and summer (example Austria during 2015 for illustration).
Source: elkemental Force, Austria, accessed 4 Sep 2020 at this link.
3
cloudy weather, which happens rarely but
has occurred in Spain in January 2021 with a
50 cm snowfall over several days, requiring
several days more to melt from PV-panels
as temperature were sub-zero. The reader
should make his/her your own calculation.
One day of Germany’s demand equals 1,5
TWh (A1). It appears that storage matching
this daily demand would suce. Howev-
er, again as specied above, the following
adjustments are required:
Adjusting for the Battery Storage
Utilization Factor of 1,7x (A8),
Adjusting for the DC/AC Conversion
and Transmission loss of 30% (A4) or
a factor of 1,3x,
Batteries last 20 years (A8.c).
Thus, Germany’s one-day energy demand
of 1,5 TWh has to be multiplied by a factor
of 1,7 x 1,3 = 2,2x. Therefore, the resulting
required one-day storage capacity increases
to ~3,3 TWh or the output of about 65 Gi-
gafactories. Since batteries last for 20 years,
more than 3 Gigafactories would have to
produce 165 GWh of battery capacity annu-
ally in perpetuity just for one day storage
capacity. During those production years, no
Tesla could be produced.
A more realistic 14-day storage backup for
Germany during the winter requires ~45
TWh of battery storage. The output of ~900
Gigafactories is required for construction
of the batteries in one year, and then the
output of ~45 Gigafactories or 2,25 TWh is
required for annual replacement of batteries
in perpetuity (45 TWh/50 GWh/20 yrs). For
comparison, the replacement of batteries
alone exceeds the current global battery
production of 0,5 TWh in 2020 by a factor
of 4 to 5x. To match the European Union’s
storage requirements, the above numbers
will have to be multiplied by six.
3.3. Spain vs. Sahara vs. California
In May 2020, energypost.eu14 announced
that “10.000 km2 of Solar in the Sahara could
provide all the world’s energy needs”. The ener-
gypost.eu author referenced the renowned
book of MacKay: “Sustainable Energy
– without the hot air”15. This statement is
refuted by the author MacKay himself who
states on page 178 that “To supply every
person in the world with an average Europe-
an’s power consumption (125 kWh/d), the area
required would be two 1.000 km by 1.000 km
squares in the desert”. That is 2.000.000 km2
not 10.000 km2.
The authors’ calculations for Germany pow-
ered from Solar PV in the Sahara, adjusting
for A5.c and Figure 1 irradiation in the
various regions, are as follows:
1. Southern Spain ~1.900 W/m2/p.a.
2. Southern California ~2.900 W/m2/p.a.
3. Sahara ~2.300 to 2.600 W/m2/p.a.
4. India ~1.300 to 1.900 W/m2/p.a.
5. South East Asia <1.500 W/m2/p.a.
(example Indonesia, Vietnam, Thai-
land, Myanmar, Malaysia)
The rst observation is that, on average,
India and South East Asia have worse sun-
shine conditions than Southern Spain. This
is primarily a result of the Monsoon. For
the Sahara at 22 ºN latitude, the DNI map
(Figure 1) illustrates that, except for a core
region, the Sahara has a lower DNI than
Southern California but is superior to Spain.
However, neither MacKay nor the authors
of the energypost.eu article considered the
following key problems with the Sahara or,
in fact, with any desert-based solar solution:
lack of water, lack of infrastructure, high
temperatures, haze, dust, and, most impor-
tantly, sandstorms.
Nomadd16, founded at Saudi Arabia’s King
Abdullah University of Science & Technolo-
gy in 2012, has studied this subject inten-
sively and concludes that “Dust build-up is
the greatest technical challenge facing a viable,
desert solar industry. A 0,4-0,8% per day base-
line yield loss caused by dust. 60% energy yield
losses during and after sandstorms are widely
reported. If left more than a day, dust particles
from organics, dew and sulfur adhere to the pan-
els”. Solar Star in California requires almost
200.000 m3 of water annually to wash the
panels for dust control17. If dust conditions
in the Sahara were similar (they are much
more stringent), then rainfall over about
250 km2 would need to be collected and
used for washing, requiring storage and
distribution facilities as well.
Numerous peer-reviewed studies researched
the issue of sandstorms and large solar parks
in the desert, but so far, no commercially vi-
able large-scale solution has been found. The
Saudi Arabian Nomadd, however, suggests
that the Nomadd system16 itself can work
without water and clean a solar panel within
two hours. The system has not been imple-
mented at large scale and costs/maintenance
and abrasive eects on the panel surface are
to be detailed. Electrostatic methods remov-
ing dust from PV elements, as planned by
ACWA in Saudi Arabia, have been studied
and oer promise. No moving parts or water
would then be required18. These methods re-
duce the need for water-surfactant cleaning
but may not eliminate it.
In addition, the desert regularly reaches
temperatures of over 50 ºC. Coupled with
heating by the absorbed solar energy, the
panels’ eciency drops by at least 0,5% per
ºC above 0 ºC19. This means that the typical
temperature rises from a typical morn-
ing temperature of 10 ºC to an afternoon
temperature of up to 50 ºC will cause a loss
of up to 20% in eciency. This requires an
even larger PV-Sahara to meet the world
energy demands. Further, the constant
expansion-contraction from diurnal cycles
of over 35 ºC stresses the panels’ electrical
and physical connections, leading to failure.
Lifetimes for PV panels in the Sahara Desert
are likely to be well below the typical 15
years. NASA20 concludes that “Solar power
in the desert brings some challenges. According
to IEEE Spectrum, extremely high temperatures
can sometimes damage inverters, which convert
the DC power made by the photovoltaics into
the AC power needed for the grid. High voltage
transformers are also subject to high temperature
loss of eciency and failure.”
In conclusion, even if the authors assume
dust, haze, and sandstorms are not problems
and assume a Sahara/CA DNI Factor of 1,1x
and reduce the Winter Capacity Factor to an
optimistic 1,3, the following applies:
Figure 3: Global and Spanish Cropland Coverage, Fractional Cropland Area.
Sources: Ramankutty and Foley 1999, Cropland Intensity 1992, accessed 4 Sep 2020 at this link;
Castillo et al., An Assessment and Spatial Modelling of Agricultural Land Abandonment in Spain (2015–2030), accessed 4 Sep 2020 at this link.
Utilised Agricultural
Area over the total land
Shares
< 20%
20%-30%
30%-40%
40%-50%
> 50%
4
No Cropland All Cropland
Fraction of Gridcell Containing Cropland
Total required adjustments compared to
California are 1,6 x 1,5 x 1,3 x 1,1 x 1,3 = 4,5x.
Thus, the total required area of PV-Sahara
for Germany becomes ~19.000 km2 (4,5 x
4.220 = 18.990 km2). If one now takes the
world 27.000 TWh vs. Germany 550 TWh,
one has to multiply the 19.000 km2 by 49x,
or ~1.000.000 km2, to provide electricity for
the entire world with solar photovoltaics
in the Sahara. This is half the area required
by MacKay because he assumed average
European consumption for the entire world.
Presently, over 600 million people in Africa
have no access to electricity at all. However,
it should be considered that above calcula-
tion and in fact also MacKay’s numbers are
too optimistic because of lack of water, lack
of infrastructure, high temperatures, haze,
dust and most importantly, sandstorms. In
addition, the task of storage and transmitting
the power to the consumers around the word
would be signicantly more challenging and
there would not be sucient raw materials
available under any scenario to construct the
required solar panels for the world.
Concentrated Solar Power (CSP – essentially
a “solar furnace” where sunlight is focused
onto a target to heat it) does not appear to
be a viable alternative as demonstrated by
numerous eciency issues with California’s
CSP plants. A proposed hybrid PV-CSP
system would use the remaining portion of
the solar spectrum that silicon cannot absorb
to boil water for a Rankine Cycle engine.
Ivanpah and other CSP plants in California
produce little power in winter due to a 7x
seasonal decline in the capacity factor21.
Thus, the use of only a small part of the solar
spectrum will be even more inecient. In the
context of H2 production, a hybrid approach
might be considered.
3.4. Hydrogen and PV-Spain
H2 can be produced via electrolysis using PV-
Spain’s excess electricity generation in sum-
mers. European governments suggest that
“green Hydrogen“ will solve the intermitten-
cy problem of wind and solar via synthetic
production of H2 as an energy carrier. How-
ever, with today’s technology hydrogen’s
low volumetric energy density and high cost
to transport is a barrier to the wide use of H2.
Compressed H2 storage requires heavy duty
storage cylinders of substances that do not
become brittle as H2 permeates the material.
More energy is required to compress or liq-
uefy and transport H2 – energy which must
also be derived from the excess energy from
PV-Spain available during summer months.
On the subject of transport, Bossel et al.22 con-
cluded that “At 200-bar, a 40-ton truck delivers
about 3,2 tons of methane, but only 320 kg of H2,
because of low density of hydrogen and because of
weight of pressure vessels and safety armatures.
About 4,6 times more energy is required to move
H2 through a pipeline than is needed for the same
natural gas energy transport.” Natural gas
pipelines may suer from H2 transport. H2
tends to permeate steel pipes, making them
brittle and increase failure rates. ACWA in
Saudi Arabia plans to produce ammonia in
combination with H2 to ease the transpor-
tation burden of Hydrogen23. We have not
considered the ecacy of this hybrid H2-NH3
concept.
It should be noted, however, that signicant
research and progress has been made in re-
cent years in relation to so-called “Hydrogen
Sponges” (see Morris et al. 2019, and North-
western University as example24). Some
candidates appear to reach 8% by weight
of H2. The materials used are relatively
inexpensive and abundant, such as transition
metals and carbon lattices as a scaold for
the metals. In the not-too-distant future, this
work promises to lead to an “H2-Revolu-
tion” allowing for an appropriate medium
for storing H2 in a dense manner presenting
a potentially viable alternative to lithium-ion
battery storage. A 500 kg Tesla battery, for ex-
ample, contains less than 100 kWh of energy.
The metal-organic H2 ‘tank’ with 8% H2 by
weight contains about 1.300 kWh of energy,
or over 13x the energy density of the Tesla Li-
ion battery. That would translate to a range
of over 4.000 km. Refueling, therefore, would
not be a daily task.
PV-Spain with an area of ~35,000 km2 is
oversized to produce the electrical energy
required for Germany in wintertime. Excess
output is nominally zero in mid-winter and
increases to a maximum in midsummer. In-
tegrated over a year, generously about half of
PV-Spain is producing excess power which
can be used for hydrogen.
At an average annual capacity factor for
Spain of 16,5% (see A6), PV-Spain with 2.000
GW installed capacity produces about 2.900
TWhDC of electricity (2.000 GW x 16,5%
x 8.760h = 2.891 TWh). Instead of battery
powered backup, hydrogen may be produced
in Germany near the point of consumption.
Electrolysis of H2O to H2 and then the use of
H2 in a fuel cell may yield an overall net e-
ciency of ~40%. Then, there is the additional
30% AC/DC and transmission loss. Thus,
PV-Spain would yield ~800 TWh of power in
Germany annually via H2. This would replace
the entire battery backup calculated above
and would be sucient for Germany’s entire
electricity consumption plus a large portion
of the energy requirements for the transporta-
tion sector. The other option is to use “only”
the excess power produced in PV-Spain
of ~1.450 TWh (half of 2.900 TWhDC) and
convert this to ~600 TWh of usable hydrogen
for the transport sector (assuming 30% AC/
DC Transmission loss and 60% electrolysis
eciency). However, the physical challenges
of transporting H2 eectively over larger dis-
tances remain and have been covered above.
The authors note that a hydrogen-based stor-
age solution does not solve the underlying
issues of solar installations illustrated in this
paper, which are mainly high raw material
input, low energy density, and low eROeI.
4. Raw Material Requirements
For the solar panels: Global production of
silicon has been about 7,5 million metric
tons p.a. since 201025. About 2-4 kg of Si are
required per 1 kW nameplate 6-7 m2 solar
panel26. The authors assume 2 kg and 7 m2 or
0,29 kg Si per m2 of solar panel.
This means the current global silicon produc-
tion could yield 26.000.000.000 m2 or 26.000
km2 of solar panels annually (7.500.000.000
kg silicon ÷ 0.29 kg/m2). Since we need to
build one time 35.000 km2 and then 2.300 km2
of solar panels every year in perpetuity just
for Germany, this translates to one time ~10
million tons of silicon or 1,35x global sili-
con production and then ~660.000 tons of
silicon annually or ~9% percent of current
global silicon production in perpetuity. Of
course, you would have far less silicon left to
produce any other globally required silicon
product such as computer chips or glass. On
a side note, polycrystalline silicon thin lms
could allow a larger area of photovoltaic, but
as of today would translate to half the quan-
tum eciency and lower stability requiring
more frequent replacement.
Silicon has been addressed above, but
high-quality silver which is produced pri-
marily in Latin America and China is also a
critical ingredient for solar panels. CRU esti-
mates that in 2019 about 11% of global 27.000
tons silver production went into solar panels
and that one solar cell requires about 0,1 mg
of silver27. Assuming 72 cells per 2 m2 panel,
this translates to about 7 g of silver per 2 m2
panel or 3,5 tons of silver per km2. Since we
Figure 4: Typical electricity demand curve and photovoltaic production. The photovoltaic peak must be approximately twice the demand peak.
Source: Nominal electricity demand curve with photovoltaic production schematic by the authors, adapted from EnergyMag accessed 4 Sep 2020 at this link.
Electricity demand curve with required PV production
01234567891011 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
kW
Hours in a day
Electricity cunsumption
PV Generation
Black area Red area
5
need to build one time 35.000 km2 and then
2.300 km2 of solar panels every year in perpe-
tuity just for Germany, this translates to one
time ~120.000 tons of silver or 4,5x global
silver production and then ~8.000 tons of
silver annually or ~30% of current global
silver production in perpetuity. Recovery of
silver from recycle panels would be essential.
A similar conclusion was reached by Zoltan
Ban28 whose requirement is twice the amount
of silver that the authors assumed. As per
today, the use of alternate materials such as
aluminum or organic conductors results in
lower panel eciency and shortened life-
times of the panels. To match the European
Union’s electricity requirements, the above
numbers will have to be multiplied by six.
For the batteries: To calculate the approx-
imate material requirement for a battery
park with 45 TWh nameplate capacity using
Tesla’s newest technology, the weight for
one Tesla battery could be assumed to be
about 500 kg with 85 kWh capacity, a factor
of 5,9 kg per kWh29. However, to be gener-
ous the authors halve the battery weight to
250 kg, to a currently still impossible 2,9 kg
per kWh, in further calculations.
Considering that 1-2% of ore body mined
end up in the battery (A7.a) and accounting
for halving the battery weight, this would
translate to 8-15 million tons of raw materi-
als p.a. for one 50 GWh factory that need to
be mined, transported and processed such
as lithium, copper, cobalt, nickel, graphite,
rare earths & bauxite, coal and iron ore (for
aluminum and steel). In addition, the min-
ing, transportation and processing of these
raw materials requires signicant energy.
In summary, the raw materials required for
batteries to keep PV-Spain backed up for 14
days would translate to one time demand
of 900 Gigafactories (45 TWh) or 7-13
billion tons and then 45 Gigafactories (2,25
TWh) or 0,4-0,7 billion tons of raw mate-
rials annually in perpetuity. For battery
replacement alone, this equals 0,5-1% of all
globally mined raw materials of 92 billion
tons30 just to create backup for Germany (a
little over 15% of the EU), a country which
is home to ~1% of the global population. To
match the entire European Union’s storage
requirements, the above numbers will have
to be multiplied by six.
Other materials required to build 2,25 TWh
of battery capacity annually in perpetuity
for Germany include31:
~6x current global Lithium produc-
tion (~880 tons Lithium per 1 GWh,
2020 production about 320.000 tons,
~70% from China),
~22x current global Graphite Anodes
production (~1.200 tons Graphite
anodes per 1 GWh, 2020 production
about 210.000 tons, ~80% from China),
~2x current global Cobalt production
(~100 tons Cobalt per 1 GWh, 2020
production about 120.000 tons, ~80%
from China), and
~8x current global Nickel Sulphite
production (~800 tons Nickel Sulphite
per 1GWh, 2020 production about of
230.000 tons32, ~60% from China).
5. Summary
Unless the safety, space, environmental, raw
material, and energy considerations can be
overcome, PV-Spain is a poor choice for solv-
ing Germany’s, Europe’s, or the global power
dilemma. Alone the material requirements
for the panels (see silicon and silver) or bat-
teries cannot be met. Moreover, the energy
required to build and maintain the batteries
for such a large solar facility in Spain – also
referred to as energy-Return-On-energy-In-
vested eROeI – have not yet been considered
in this paper.
If it does not make sense to replace Germa-
ny’s power demand (or a little over 15% of
EU demand) with solar from Spain, why
would it make sense to replace alone a frac-
tion of power requirement from solar panels
installed further North of Spain or in India
or Asia for that matter, where the natural
sunshine conditions are worse?33
Alternatives to currently available solar pho-
tovoltaic technology, as well as more research
to understand the material and energy input,
are required for the proposed energy tran-
sition away from conventional power. Solar
PV may be an environmental and economical
choice for certain local power requirements
without access to large scale grids, or to
augment non-critical power requirements for
selected – non-scale – power requirements.
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
California solar photovoltaic capacity factor 2018-2020
Monthly capacity factor in %
1 Estimated data according to Agora and europa.eu, accessed
4 Sep 2020 at this link and this link.
2 Germany’s actual peak power demand reaches up to 82 GW in the
winter according to Wikipedia, Agora, BMWI, and entso-e, accessed 3
Jan 2021.
3 Facts on Solar Star and the World’s largest solar power parks, accessed
3 Jan 2021 at this link and this link.
4 Solargis: Solar Irradiance Data, accessed 3 Jan 2020 at this link.
5 Aleo Solar: Solar panel lifespan – The 6 things to know, accessed
3 Jan 2021 at this link.
6 Nevada Gigafactory hoping to achieve 40 GWh output according to
Rich Duprey, The Motley Fool, accessed 4 Sep 2020 at this link.
7 Not much research has been done on this subject, this assumption seems
realistic and conservative and has been vetted by the authors. Refer to
Mark Mills, July 2020, accessed 4 Sep 2020 at this link and this link.
8 A 500 Ah sealed lead-acid battery (SLA) is capable of a pulse output
of many amperes, i.e. when starting your car, but should be charged
at ~0.2C over ve hours, i.e. at ~100 A. The discharge rate of a Li-ion
battery at 1C means that a fully charged battery rated at 1 Ah provides
1 A (one coulomb per second) for one hour. For a composite battery
consisting of 100 x 1 Ah Li-ion batteries with a capacity of 100 Ah, 1C
then equates to a discharge current of 100 A for one hour. A 5C rate
for this battery would be 500 A, and a C/2 rate would be 50 A. Li-ion
batteries withstand up to 10C charge rates, according to Tesla.
9 Hagopian: Battery Degradation and Power Loss, BatteryEducation.
com, April 2006, accessed 3 Jan 2021 at this link.
10 BatteryUniversity: What’s the Best Battery?, March 2017, accessed
3 Jan 2021 at this link.
11 Brook: The Catch-22 of Energy Storage, Energy Central on eROeI,
August 2014, accessed 3 Jan 2021 at this link.
12 Lu et al.: Impacts of Large-Scale Sahara Solar Farms on Global Climate
and Vegetation Cover; AGU Research Letter, Dec 2020, accessed 15 Feb
2021 at this link; see also Li et al.: Climate model shows large-scale wind
and solar farms in the Sahara increase rain and vegetation; Science
Magazine, Sep 2018, accessed 15 Feb 2021 at this link.
13 Total global installed solar capacity in 2020 was 715GW, IEA, accessed
3 Jan 2020.
14 Energy Post: 10,000 sq km of Solar in the Sahara, May 2020, accessed 5
Jan 2021 at this link.
15 David MacKay: Sustainable Energy — without the hot air, November
2008, accessed 5 Jan 2021 at this link.
16 NOMADD: The Desert Solar Challenge, accessed 5 Jan 2021at this
link.
17 BHE Renewables: Just the Facts – Solar Star Projects, March 2017,
accessed 15 Jan 2021 at this link.
18 Kawamoto: Electrostatic cleaning equipment for dust removal from
soiled solar panels, Journal of Electrostatics, Volume 98, March 2019,
Pages 11-16, accessed 15 Jan 2021 at this link.
19 Moharram et al.: Enhancing the performance of photovoltaic panels
by water cooling, Ain Shams Engineering Journal, Volume 4, Issue 4,
December 2013, Pages 869-877, accessed 5 Jan 2021 at this link.
20 Nasa.gov: Catching Rays in the Desert, accessed 5 Jan 2021 at this link.
21 Information on Ivanpah Solar Power Facility, accessed 15 Jan 2021 at
this link.
22 Bossel et al..: The Future of the Hydrogen Economy: Bright or Bleak?,
Cogeneration and Competitive Power Journal Volume 18, Issue 3,
2003, accessed 10 Jan 2021 at this link.
23 Air Products: ACWA Power and NEOM Sign Agreement for $5
Billion Production Facility, July 2020, accessed 18 Jan 2021 at this link.
24 Northwestern University: Gas storage method could help next-
generation clean energy vehicles, April 2020, accessed 10 Jan 2021
at this link; and Morris et al.: A manganese hydride molecular sieve
for practical hydrogen storage under ambient conditions, Energy &
Environmental Science, Issue 5, 2019, accessed 10 Jan 2021 at this link.
25 Statista: Silicon production worldwide from 2010 to 2019, February
2020, accessed 4 Sep 2020 at this link.
26 Stack Exchange, accessed 4 Sep 2020 at this link.
27 The Silver Institute: Market Trend Report, June 2020, accessed 15 Oct
2020 at this link; and Statista: Global mine production of silver from
2005 to 2019, February 2020, accessed 15 Oct 2020 at this link.
28 Zoltan Ban: Not Enough Silver To Power The World Even If Solar
Power Eciency Were To Quadruple, Seeking Alpha, February 2017,
accessed 4 Nov 2020 at this link.
29 Tesla’s Powerwalls designed for power backup have a capacity of 13,5
kWh and masses 114 kg including the frame. Assuming 100 kg is the
net battery weight, this translates to 7,4 kg per kWh, so less eective
than Tesla‘s car batteries, but the authors remain optimistic and
overlook this.
30 WU Vienna (2020): Material ows by material group, 1970-2017,
accessed 4 Jan 2021 at this link.
31 Benchmark Mineral Intelligence Data 2020, accessed 3 Jan 2021 at this
link and this link.
32 Despite the total nickel market being large (over 2,3 million tons) only
a fraction is geared to making nickel sulphate chemical for lithium-ion
battery usage, see also footnote 30 for more details.
33 The latest 180 MW PV-park project in Germany by utility ENBW,
located in Brandenburg, at over 50 ºN latitude, will not be able to
achieve its purported energy production with realizable PV materials.
The project is summarized by ENBW, accessed 20 Jan 2021 at this link.
34 Bine Information Services, accessed 4 Sep 2020 at this link; and PV
Education, accessed 4 Oct 2020 at this link.
6
Note: Silicon is produced essentially from silica (quartz stone),
wood chips, and coal. Silicon is the second most abundant
element in the Earth’s crust, but so far only high-purity silica
(quartz stone) is commercially viable. Metallurgical-grade sil-
icon (MG-Si, about 98% purity) is manufactured at a process
temperature of more than 2.000 ºC in electric arc furnaces that
also require coal for reduction and energy. Both solar-grade
silicon (SoG-Si, 99,9999% purity) and electronic-grade
silicon (EG-Si, 99,9999999% purity) are then produced out of
metallurgical-grade silicon in a rening process (“Siemens”
or other processes) that again requires large amounts of energy
and also chemicals.34
Figure 5: California solar photovoltaic capacity factor 2018-2020.
Note: Values for 2019 and prior years are nal. Values for 2020 are preliminary. For 2020, only data from January to November is considered.
Source: EIA, accessed 3 Jan 2020 at this link.
Average
2018
2019
2020
Wieviel km2 Solarpanelen in Spanien und wieviel
Batterie-Backup wären nötig, um Deutschland
vollständig mit Solar-Strom zu versorgen?
1. Zusammenfassung
Deutschland ist für etwa 2% der weltweiten energiebedingten CO2-Emis-
sionen verantwortlich. Um Deutschlands Strombedarf (oder etwas mehr als
15% des EU-Strombedarfs) allein durch in Spanien installierte PV-Anlagen
decken zu können, müssten etwa 7% der Fläche Spaniens mit Solarmodulen
bebaut werden (~35.000 km2). Spanien ist das in Europa am günstigsten
gelegene Land für Solarenergie. Tatsächlich ist Spanien viel besser für Solar-
energie geeignet als Indien oder (Südost)Asien. Der spanische Solarpark
(„PV-Spanien“) müsste eine installierte Gesamtkapazität von 2.000 GWp
oder knapp das Dreifache der 2020 weltweit installierten Kapazität von 715
GW vorhalten. Darüber hinaus würde eine Batterie-Speicherkapazität von
insgesamt etwa 45 TWh benötigt. Die Herstellung einer solchen Speicher-
kapazität bei Verwendung der heute führenden Technologie würde den
jährlichen Gesamtoutput von 900 Tesla Gigafactories bei voller Kapazität
erfordern. Dabei wurde nicht berücksichtigt, dass die Batterien spätestens
alle 20 Jahre ersetzt werden müssen. Für den gesamten europäischen Strom-
bedarf würden sechsmal so viel, als etwa 40% der Fläche Spaniens (~200.000
km2) sowie eine sechsmal höhere Batteriekapazität benötigt.
Allein für die Stromversorgung Deutschlands müssten die Solar-Module des
Solarparks etwa alle 15 Jahre ausgetauscht werden. Hierfür wären einmalig
~10 Millionen Tonnen Silizium oder die 1,35-fache Menge der weltweiten
Silizium-Jahresproduktion erforderlich und anschließend dauerhaft ~660.000
Tonnen Silizium jährlich oder 9% der jetzigen weltweiten Siliziumproduk-
tion. Zusätzlich entspräche der benötigte Silberbedarf einmalig ~120.000
Tonnen Silber oder die 4,5-fache Menge der weltweiten Silber-Jahresproduk-
tion und anschließend dauerhaft ~8.000 Tonnen Silber jährlich oder ~30%
der jetzigen weltweiten Silberproduktion.
Zudem stünden auch für die benötigte Batterie-Speicherkapazität nicht
genügend Rohstoe zur Verfügung. Die Herstellung eines 14-Tages-Batterie-
Backups für Deutschland würde die weltweite Batterieproduktion des Jahres
2020 um den Faktor 4 bis 5 übersteigen. Um die benötigten Batterien allein
für Deutschland (oder für etwas mehr als 15% des EU-Strombedarfs) herstel-
len zu können, wären jährlich etwa 0,4-0,8 Milliarden Tonnen an Rohstoen
(7 bis 13 Milliarden Tonnen für die Einrichtung des Backups) nötig, die abge-
baut, transportiert und verarbeitet werden müssten. Für Europa wäre es die
sechsfache Menge an Rohstoen. Diese umfassen Lithium, Kupfer, Kobalt,
Nickel, Grat, Seltene Erden & Bauxit, Kohle und Eisenerz für Aluminium
und Stahl. Um die Batterien nur für Deutschland produzieren zu können,
würde die weltweite Gesamtproduktion 2020 von Lithium, Graphit, Kobalt
und Nickel um ein Vielfaches nicht ausreichen.
Die geringe Energiedichte und ein hoher Rohstoeinsatz sowie der niedrige energy-
Return-On-energy-Invested (eROeI) und die enormen Speicheranforderungen
machen die heute herrschende Solar-Technologie zu einer ökologisch und ökonomisch
weit unterlegenen Alternative, um konventionelle Energieformen im großen Maß-
stab im Energiemix zu ersetzen.
Quelle: Der von EDF Renewable betriebene “Bolero Solar PV plant”, Chiles zweitgrößter Solarpark mit einer Leistung von 146 Megawatt Peak
(MWp), in der Atacama-Wüste in der Region Antofagasta. Foto: Antonio Garcia, abrufbar unter diesem Link.
Disclaimer: Hierbei handelt es sich um eine
Überschlagsrechnung, die auf Erfahrungen aus
bestehenden PV-Anlagen in Kalifornien und
öentlich zugänglichen Daten der Sonnenein-
strahlung für Spanien basiert. Die Berech-
nungen können unter Verwendung eigener
Annahmen angepasst und verfeinert werden.
Einleitung:
Leistung (in Watt) ist z.B. die Pferdestärke
eines Automotors. Die Energie für den
Antrieb eines Teslas, zum Beispiel, muss
dann aus einer Batterie gewonnen werden.
Die 0,5-Tonnen-Batterie eines Tesla S treibt
einen 192-kW-Elektromotor an, um den 2,2
Tonnen schweren Tesla S zu beschleunigen.
Arbeit oder Energie (in Wattstunde oder
Wh) ist der Aufwand, der erforderlich ist,
um den 2,2-Tonnen-Tesla bspw. 1 Stunde
lang mit 100 km/h über ein bestimmtes
Gelände zu bewegen. Energie ist gleichbe-
deutend mit “Arbeit”. In diesem Fall variiert
die Energie mit der Fahrzeit, der Geschwin-
digkeit, der Masse, der Aerodynamik, der
Reibung und der zur Überwindung dieser
“Hindernisse” eingesetzten Leistung.
• Der Nutzungsgrad ist der üblicherweise
auf Jahresbasis angegebene prozentuale
Anteil der Leistung, der aus der installierten
Kapazität an einem bestimmten Standort
generiert wird.
- Der Nutzungsgrad ist nicht gleich dem
Wirkungsgrad. Der Wirkungsgrad misst
den Prozentsatz der eingesetzten Energie,
die in nutzbare Energie umgewandelt
wird.
- In Bezug auf Solaranlagen unterstellt der
Nutzungsgrad eine stabile photovoltaische
Reaktion und misst die Standortqualität,
die je nach Breitengrad, Luftmasse, Jahres-
zeit, 24-Stunden-Sonnenzyklus an diesem
Standort (auch „diurnal“ genannt) und
Wetter variiert.
- In Deutschland erreichen Photovoltaik-
Anlagen („PV“) im Durchschnitt einen
jährlichen Nutzungsgrad von ~10%,
während in Kalifornien durchschnittliche
Jahreswerte von 25% erreicht werden.3
Mit anderen Worten erzielt eine PV-An-
lage in Kalifornien eine zweieinhalbmal
größere Leistung als eine identische An-
lage in Deutschland.
- Dabei ist es wichtig zwischen dem durch-
schnittlichen jährlichen Nutzungsgrad
und dem monatlichen bzw. wöchentlichen
und täglichen Nutzungsgrad zu unter-
scheiden. Diese Unterscheidung ist vor
allem dann relevant, wenn der tägliche
Strombedarf vollständig durch Solarstrom
gedeckt werden soll (siehe Abb. 5).
Von
Dr. Lars Schernikau und
Prof. William H. Smith
Veröffentlicht im November
2020, zuletzt aktualisiert
im März 2021 (die Autoren
bedanken sich für das
umfangreiche Feedback,
das maßgeblich zu dieser
überarbeiteten Fassung des
Artikels beigetragen hat).
Online verfügbar unter
Researchgate & SSRN.
DOI: 10.2139/ssrn.3730155
Die englische Originalfassung
dieses Artikels wurde frei ins
Deutsche übersetzt.
Über die Autoren:
Dr. Lars Schernikau ist
Energieökonom und
Unternehmer in der
Energierohstofndustrie.
Prof. William Hayden
Smith ist Professor für
Geowissenschaften und
Planetologie am McDonnell
Center for Space Sciences
der Universität Washington,
St. Louis, MO, USA.
1
2. Einführung und Annahmen
Am 3. Juli 2020 kündigte die deutsche Umwelt-
ministerin Svenja Schulze öentlich an, dass
Deutschland als weltweit erstes Land sowohl die
Atomenergie als auch die Kohle hinter sich lassen
werde: „Wir setzen auf die vollständige Energiever-
sorgung aus Sonne- und Windkraft“. Diese Aussage
und die Prognose der IEA vom Oktober 2020,
dass Solarenergie der „neue König am globalen
Energiemarkt“ werden wird, veranlasste die Auto-
ren zu den hier vorgestellten Berechnungen.
Die Autoren möchten mit diesem Artikel aufzei-
gen, wie viel installierte PV-Kapazität in Spanien
benötigt würde, um den deutschen Strombedarf
zu 100% (oder etwas mehr als 15% des EU-Strom-
bedarfs) mit Solarenergie aus Spanien zu decken.
Im Folgenden wird der photovoltaische Solarpark
in Spanien als „PV-Spanien“ bezeichnet. Auf-
grund seiner hohen direkten Normaleinstrahlung
(DNI, siehe Abb. 1) ist Spanien der beste Standort
für Solarstrom in Europa. Tatsächlich hat Spanien
eine deutlich höhere nutzbare Sonneneinstrah-
lung als Indien oder (Südost)Asien.
Darüber hinaus berechnen die Autoren die erfor-
derliche Backup-Kapazität in Form von Batterien
sowie den benötigen Materialeinsatz für den PV-
Spanien als auch für das Backup. Zudem werden
die Themen eines Solarparks in der Sahara und
Wassersto erörtert. Die mehrdimensionalen
Berechnungen verdeutlichen die Komplexität der
Energiewirtschaft, die in der aktuellen Diskussion
um die Energiewende hin zu erneuerbaren Ener-
gien häug unterschätzt wird.
Vereinfachende Annahmen
Die Berechnungen der Autoren basieren auf
den folgenden, vereinfachenden Annahmen, die
grundsätzlich recht optimistisch sind. Der Leser
kann diese Annahmen gerne durch seine eigenen
ersetzen:
A1. Durchschnittlicher Strombedarf: Deutsch-
land hat einen durchschnittlichen Strombedarf
von bis zu ~550 TWh pro Jahr. Zur Vereinfa-
chung rechnen die Autoren mit ~45 TWh pro
Monat bzw. ~1,5 TWh pro Tag. Zum Vergleich:
Der Strombedarf der EU liegt bei 3.300 TWh
pro Jahr und ist damit sechsmal so hoch.1
A2. Spitzenstromlast-Faktor = 1,6x: Deutschland
hat einen durchschnittlichen Strombedarf von
~63 GW (550 TWh ÷ 8.760h). Die tatsäch-
liche Spitzenstromlast liegt im Winter bei 82
GW. Unter Berücksichtigung einer üblichen
Sicherheitsmarge von ca. 20% steigt die er-
forderliche Kapazität für die Spitzenleistung
auf ~100 GW (100 ÷ 63=1,59).2 Aufgrund von
Elektrofahrzeugen und Wärmepumpen wird
die Spitzennachfrage vermutlich steigen.
Der Spitzenstromlast-Faktor ermittelt den
täglichen Spitzenstrombedarf aus dem durch-
schnittlichen jährlichen Strombedarf unter
Berücksichtigung der Sicherheitsmarge, die
überdurchschnittlich hoch ist. Zum Vergleich:
Der durchschnittliche Strombedarf der EU
liegt bei ~375 GW, also sechsmal höher als in
Deutschland.
A3. Backup Spitzenstromlast-Faktor = 1,5x: Abb.
4 veranschaulicht die typische Strombedarfs-
kurve und die Solarstromproduktion während
eines Tages. Die Photovoltaik-Spitze muss
etwa doppelt so hoch sein wie die Nachfra-
gespitze, damit die Batterien während den
wenigen sonnenintensiven Stunden um die
Mittagszeit aufgeladen werden können. Abb. 2
zeigt, dass fast der gesamte Strom in nur einem
Viertel einer 24-Stunden-Periode produziert
wird (und 0% während der Nacht). Die Auto-
ren rechnen großzügig nur mit einem Backup
Spitzenstromlast-Faktor von 1,5x.
A4. Strom-Umwandlung und Übertragungsver-
lust = 30% oder 1,3x: Bei der Umwandlung
von Gleichstrom in Wechselstrom vor dem
Verbrauch entsteht ein Verlust von 21-24%3
der erzeugten Gleichstromleistung. Beim
Transport des Stroms zum deutschen End-
verbraucher über ca. 1.500 km (Luftlinie
von Toledo nach Frankfurt) gehen ca. 10%
verloren. Insgesamt summiert sich der Verlust
auf ~30% bzw. einen Faktor von etwa 1,3x.
A5. Die durchschnittliche jährliche DNI in
Spanien am 41ºN Breitengrad wird auf Basis
der Daten des größten US-Solarparks „Solar
Star“3 in Kalifornien normiert, für den gut
dokumentierte Daten vorliegen.
a. Solar Star zählt zu den größten, ezien-
testen und modernsten Solarparks der
Welt, bei dem auf einachsigen Trackern
installierte kristalline Silizium-Solarmodule
zum Einsatz kommen. Diese kosteninten-
siven Module zeichnen sich insbesondere
durch einen hohen Formfaktor, eine hohe
Leistung und einen hohen Wirkungsgrad
aus. Zwischen 2017 und 2019 produzierte
Solar Star 1,66 TWh Gleichstrom pro Jahr.
Der Solarpark erzielte eine installierte
Gesamtleistung von 747 MWDC bei einer
Fläche von 13 km2 und 1,7 Millionen Solar-
modulen3, was einer installierten Leistung
von 57,5 MW pro km2 entspricht.
b. Die Karte der direkten Normaleinstrahlung
in Abb. 1 berücksichtigt die Sonnentage in
Spanien. Sie ist an Breitengrad, Bewölkung,
Regen sowie Tag und Nacht angepasst.
c. ESP/CA DNI-Faktor = 1,5: Die DNI für
Südspanien beträgt ~1.900 W/m2/p.a.,
während die DNI in Südkalifornien bei
~2.900 W/m2/p.a.4 liegt. Daraus ergibt sich
ein Faktor von 1,53.
d. Solarmodule haben eine Lebenszeit von ca.
15 Jahren bevor sie ersetzt werden müssen.5
A6. Winter-Nutzungsgrad = 1,8: Solar Stars
durchschnittlicher jährlicher Nutzungsgrad
in Kalifornien wurde für die Jahre 2017-2019
mit 24,8% ermittelt.3 Dies entspricht einem
durchschnittlichen jährlichen Nutzungsgrad
für Spanien von 16,5%.
a. Der monatliche Nutzungsgrad in Kalifor-
nien schwankte in den Jahren 2018/2019
zwischen 13,3% im Dezember und 33,9%
im Juni (siehe Abb. 5), woraus sich ein
Anpassungsfaktor für den Nutzungsgrad
im Winter von 1,8x (24,8% ÷ 13,3% = 1,86)
ergibt.
b. Abb. 2 zeigt die typische PV-Leistung an
Sonnentagen im Winter und Sommer in
Österreich. Die Leistung variiert auch hier
zwischen Winter und Sommer um einen
Faktor von mehr als 3:1, somit ist ein Fak-
tor von 1,8 eher optimistisch.
A7. Gigafactory = 50 GWh Lithium-Ionen-Bat-
terien: Die Jahresproduktion einer Tesla
Gigafactory wird voraussichtlich bei bis zu 50
GWh Lithium-Ionen-Batterien liegen.6
a. Zu den Materialien, die für den Bau der
heutigen Batterietechnologie benötigt
werden, gehören Lithium, Kupfer, Kobalt,
Nickel, Graphit, Seltene Erden & Bauxit,
Kohle und Eisenerz (für Aluminium und
Stahl).
b. Es wird optimistisch angenommen, dass
1-2% des abgebauten Erzes nach der Ver-
arbeitung in Form von Metallen in der
Batterie tatsächlich genutzt werden7.
A8. Batteriespeicher-Nutzungsgrad = 1,7:
Lithium-Ionen-Akkus können Energie über
mehrere Monate speichern und verlieren ~5%
der gespeicherten Energie in den ersten 24
Stunden und danach ~2% pro Monat.
a. Der Wirkungsgrad der Ladungsspeiche-
rung beträgt 90%.
b. Das Auaden auf 80% und Entladen auf
20% der Kapazität schont die Lebensdauer
der Batterie. Die Elektronik der Batterie
sorgt für eine optimale interne Betriebstem-
peratur von 12-16 ºC sowie eine optimale
Entladungsrate nahe 1C (bezieht sich auf
eine Entladungsrate von 1 Coulomb pro
Sekunde für eine Stunde)8 und schützt die
Batterien zudem vor zu hohen oder zu
niedrigen Lade- oder Entladungsspannun-
gen, die die Batterien beschädigen könnten9.
c. Die Wartungselektronik verbraucht 3% der
Zellladung pro Monat. Der tägliche Ent-
ladungszyklus muss sorgfältig kontrolliert
werden, um die Batterielebensdauer von bis
zu 7.000 Zyklen zu gewährleisten, was einer
Lebensdauer von ca. 20 Jahren entspricht.10
d. Im Ergebnis können durchschnittlich
50-60% der installierten Batteriekapazität
eektiv genutzt werden. Daher wird ein
Faktor von 1,7x angenommen.
Abb. 1: Globale direkte Normaleinstrahlung, basierend auf dem Langzeitmittelwert kWh/m2.
Quelle: World Bank Group, Stand 12. November 2020, abrufbar unter diesem Link.
Langfristige Durchschnittswerte der Tages- bzw. Jahresbeträge (DNI)
Tagesbeträge
Jahresbeträge
1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 6.0 7.0 8.0 9.0 10.0
365 730 1095 1461 1826 2191 2556 2922 3287 3652
kWh/m2
2
A9. Die folgenden Faktoren wurden von den
Autoren nicht berücksichtigt:
a. Der Gesamtenergieverbrauch Deutsch-
lands, der sich in etwa auf das Fünache
des Stromverbrauchs beläuft (inkl. Energie
für Transport und Wärme/Heizung).
b. Energie, die Deutschland aus anderen
Teilen der Welt indirekt importiert, in-
dem Deutschland Produkte konsumiert,
die außerhalb Deutschlands hergestellt
werden (wie etwa in China, Indien oder
den USA) und Energie in der Herstellung
benötigen.
c. Alternative Möglichkeiten der Stromerzeu-
gung, da von einer 100%-igen Versorgung
Deutschlands (entspricht etwas mehr als
15% der EU) mit Solarstrom aus Spanien
ausgegangen wird.
d. Alternative Möglichkeiten zur Bereit-
stellung von Speicherkapazitäten (außer
Batterien), wie das Backup aus konven-
tioneller Energie z.B. aus fossilen und
nuklearen Brennstoen, Wasserkraft oder
Wassersto. In diesem Artikel werden die
Anforderungen an Batterien als Speicher-
medien beschrieben. Zudem diskutieren
die Autoren Wassersto als eine mögliche
Alternative.
e. Die Umweltauswirkungen sowie die Kos-
ten und der Energie- und Rohstobedarf
für den Bau von Übertragungsleitungen
und -Systemen und den Bau von Solar-
modulen (der Silizium- und Silberbedarf
wurde hier berücksichtigt, andere Materia-
lien nicht). Der energy-Return-On-energy-
Invested (eROeI) von Solaranlagen wird
für fortgeschrittene Gesellschaften als zu
niedrig bewertet.11
f. Die Kosten und Umweltauswirkungen
des Recyclings bzw. der Entsorgung von
Solarmodulen nach ihrer Nutzungsdau-
er. Außerdem die Kosten des Baus, der
Instandhaltung und des Recyclings bzw.
der Entsorgung der Speicherkapazitäten,
die spätestens alle 20 Jahre ersetzt werden
müssen (die für den Bau der Batterien be-
nötigten Materialien wurden nachfolgend
geschätzt).
g. Die Kosten der Landnutzung wie etwa
die Zerstörung der Tierwelt sowie die Ab-
holzung von benötigten Wäldern bzw. Ver-
nichtung von Ackerland, Städten, Straßen,
Tälern und Bergen (siehe Abb. 3).
h. Der Einuss großächiger Solarparks auf
die lokalen Temperaturen. Die Sonnen-
einstrahlung auf die Vegetation (Gras,
Bäume) unterstützt das Panzenwachstum
und die Panzen wiederum die Kühlung
durch Verdunstung. Auf Flächen, die mit
Solarmodulen bedeckt sind, können 70-
90% des absorbierten Sonnenlichts weder
in nutzbare Energie umgewandelt noch
von Panzen absorbiert werden, was zu
einer Erwärmung der Umgebung führt
(siehe Lu et al. Dezember 2020 und Li et al.
September 201812).
i. Positive Nebeneekte z.B. aus der Pro-
duktion von grünem Wassersto durch
die Nutzung von Überkapazitäten im
Sommer. Das Thema Wassersto wird in
Abschnitt 3.4 kurz diskutiert.
3. Berechnung des PV-Spanien
Ziel dieses Artikels ist es, zu berechnen, wie viel
Solarkapazität in Spanien (PV-Spanien) installiert
werden müsste, um damit 100% des deutschen
Strombedarfs zu decken, was etwas mehr als 15%
der EU-Stromnachfrage entspricht. Dazu müsste
die installierte Leistung von PV-Spanien auch in
den Wintermonaten ausreichen. Im Winter ist die
produzierte Solarenergie jedoch am geringsten,
während der Verbrauch am höchsten ist.
3.1. Installierte Leistung und
Flächenbedarf für PV-Spanien
Für die Berechnung verwenden die Autoren das
Solar Star3 Projekt in Kalifornien, für das umfang-
reiche Daten verfügbar sind. Auf Basis von
747 MW Gesamtleistung und 57,5 MW/km2
installierter Leistung produzierte Solar Star
durchschnittlich 1,66 TWh/p.a. Gleichstrom
bzw. 128 GWh/km2/p.a. (siehe A5. a) bzw.
10,67 GWh/km2/Monat. Der Strombedarf
Deutschlands liegt im Durchschnitt bei 45 TWh
bzw. 45.000 GWh pro Monat (siehe A1).
Auf den ersten Blick erscheint es, dass monat-
lich 45.000 GWh ÷ 10,67 GWh/km2 = 4.220 km2
Solarmodule in Spanien ausreichen sollten. Es
sind jedoch noch die folgenden, oben erläuterten
Anpassungen erforderlich:
• Anpassung für den Spitzenstromlast-Faktor
von 1,6x (A2),
• Anpassung für den Backup Spitzenstrom-
last-Faktor von 1,5x (A3),
• Anpassung für die Strom-Umwandlung und
den Übertragungsverlust von 30% (A4) bzw.
einen Faktor von 1,3x,
• Anpassung der höheren Sonneneinstrahlung
in Kalifornien an die niedrigere Sonnenein-
strahlung in Spanien mit einem ESP/CA
DNI-Faktor von 1,5x (A5.c),
• Anpassung des durchschnittlichen Nut-
zungsgrads an den Winter-Nutzungsgrad
von 1,8x (A6).
Die insgesamt erforderlichen Anpassungen sum-
mieren sich auf 1,6 x 1,5 x 1,3 x 1,5 x 1,8 = 8,4x.
Somit beträgt die benötigte Gesamtäche von
PV-Spanien nur für Deutschlands Strombedarf
~35.000 km2 (8,4 x 4.220 km2 = 35.448 km2). Da
Solarmodule im Durchschnitt eine Lebensdauer
von 15 Jahren haben, müssten dauerhaft ~2.300
km2 neue Solarmodule pro Jahr gebaut werden.
Berücksichtigt man, dass Solar Star in Kalifornien
eine installierte Leistung von 747 MWDC hat,
bräuchte PV-Spanien eine installierte Gesamt-
leistung von 2.000 GW bzw. fast das Dreifache
der 2020 weltweit installierten Solarkapazität
von 715 GW13 (35.000 km2 x 57,5 MW/km2 =
2.013 GW). Dabei ist zu beachten, dass PV-Spa-
nien nur ein Fünftel des gesamten Energiebedarfs
Deutschlands deckt und Deutschland für nur 2%
der globalen, von Menschen verursachten CO2-
Emissionen für die Energiegewinnung verant-
wortlich ist (ohne Berücksichtigung von Methan).
Mit einer Fläche von ~35.000 km2 ist PV-Spanien
überdimensioniert um die für Deutschland be-
nötigte Elektrizität im Winter zu erzeugen. Die
Überschussleistung ist im Hochwinter nominell
Null und steigt im Hochsommer auf ein Maxi-
mum an. Über ein Jahr betrachtet, produziert
etwa die Hälfte von PV-Spanien überschüssigen
Strom (wenn auch nicht kontinuierlich), der für
grünen Wassersto oder andere Zwecke wie
z.B. Verhüttung genutzt werden könnte (siehe
Abschnitt 3.4).
Die Autoren möchten an dieser Stelle darauf
hinweisen, dass der Flächenbedarf von PV-Spa-
nien erheblich reduziert werden könnte, wenn
die Backup-Kapazität um den Faktor 10 erhöht
würde. Diese Reduzierung wäre möglich, wenn
ein solches Backup – eventuell auch in Form von
Wassersto – den Strombedarf Deutschlands für
ein halbes Jahr speichern könnte, so dass die im
Sommer gewonnene und gespeicherte Energie
einen Teil des deutschen Strombedarfs im Winter
decken kann. Um den Strombedarf der Euro-
päischen Union zu decken, müssten die oben
genannten Werte mit sechs multipliziert werden.
3.2. Speicherkapazität und Backup
Es ist oensichtlich, dass alle nicht-kontinuier-
lichen Formen der Stromerzeugung ein Backup
erfordern, selbst wenn die Sonne scheinbar „fast“
jeden Tag scheint oder der Wind scheinbar „fast“
immer weht. Das Backup muss so gestaltet sein,
dass die Stromversorgung des Verbrauchers
jederzeit zu mehr als 99% gesichert ist. Eine
Volkswirtschaft, die nicht in der Lage ist, eine
zuverlässige Stromversorgung bereitzustellen,
riskiert Menschenleben und verliert im globalen
Kontext ihre wirtschaftliche Bedeutung.
Es werden die folgenden zwei Berechnungen
vorgenommen: A) Die benötigte Backup-Kapa-
zität für einen einzigen Tag, unter der Annahme,
dass die Sonne in Spanien jeden Tag scheint.
B) Die Backup-Kapazität für einen Zeitraum von
14 Tagen bei bewölktem Wetter, was zwar in
Spanien selten vorkommt, aber im Januar 2021
mit Schneefällen von 50 cm über mehrere Tage
auftrat. Es dauerte einige Tage, bis der Schnee bei
Temperaturen unter dem Gefrierpunkt von den
Solarmodulen abtaute. Der Leser sollte hier gerne
seine eigenen Berechnungen anstellen.
Der Strombedarf Deutschlands an einem Tag
entspricht 1,5 TWh (A1). Es scheint, dass ein
Speicher für diesen Tagesbedarf ausreichen
Sommer ggü. Winter > 3:1
5,0
4,5
4,0
3,5
3,0
2,5
2,0
1,5
1,0
0,5
0,0
Uhrzeit: GMT+1, keine Sommerzeit
PV Output Power [kW]
Sonnentage
11.05.2015
01.08.2015
01.11.2015
06.02.2016
31.12.2015
21:00
22:00
20:00
19:00
18:00
17:00
16:00
15:00
14:00
13:00
12:00
11:00
10:00
09:00
08:00
07:00
06:00
05:00
04:00
Abb. 2: Typische PV-Leistung im Winter und Sommer (Beispiel Österreich im Jahr 2015 zur Veranschaulichung).
Quelle: elkemental Force, Österreich, Stand 12. November 2020, abrufbar unter diesem Link.
3
würde. Allerdings sind, wie oben ausgeführt, die
folgenden Anpassungen erforderlich:
• Anpassung für den Batteriespeicher-Nut-
zungsgrad von 1,7x (A8),
• Anpassung für die Strom-Umwandlung und
den Übertragungsverlust von 30% (A4) bzw.
einen Faktor von 1,3x,
• Die Batterien haben eine Lebensdauer von ca.
20 Jahren (A8. c).
Somit muss der Strombedarf Deutschlands an
einem Tag von 1,5 TWh mit einem Faktor von
1,7 x 1,3 = 2,2x multipliziert werden. Entspre-
chend steigt die sich daraus ergebende benötigte
Speicherkapazität für einen Tag auf ~3,3 TWh
bzw. die Leistung von etwa 65 Gigafactories. Da
Batterien eine Lebensdauer von 20 Jahren haben,
müssten mehr als 3 Gigafactories dauerhaft 165
GWh an Batteriekapazität pro Jahr produzieren,
nur um einen Tag Speicherkapazität bereitstellen
zu können. Während dieser Jahre könnten keine
Teslas produziert werden.
Ein realistischeres 14-Tages-Backup für Deutsch-
land während des Winters erfordert ~45 TWh an
Batteriespeicher. Für den Bau der Batterien wird
die Leistung von ~900 Gigafactories in einem
Jahr benötigt, und im Anschluss die Leistung von
dauerhaft ~45 Gigafactories oder 2,25 TWh für
den jährlichen Ersatz der Batterien (45 TWh/50
GWh/20 Jahre). Zum Vergleich: Der Ersatz der
Batterien allein übersteigt die derzeitige globale
Batterieproduktion von 0,5 TWh im Jahr 2020
um den Faktor 4 bis 5. Um den Speicherbedarf
der Europäischen Union zu decken, müssen die
oben genannten Werte mit dem Faktor sechs
multipliziert werden.
3.3. Spanien vs. Sahara vs. Kalifornien
Im Mai 2020 traf energypost.eu14 die Aussage, dass
„10.000 km2 Solarmodule in der Sahara den gesamten
Energiebedarf der Welt decken könnten“. Der energy-
post.eu Autor bezog sich dabei auf das renom-
mierte Buch von MacKay: “Sustainable Energy
– without the hot air”15. Diese Aussage wird vom
Autor MacKay selbst widerlegt, der auf Seite 178
feststellt: „Um jeden Menschen auf der Welt mit dem
Stromverbrauch eines Durchschnittseuropäers (125
kWh/d) zu versorgen, wäre eine Fläche von zwei Qua-
draten mit 1.000 km Seitenlänge in der Wüste nötig“.
Das sind 2.000.000 km2 und nicht 10.000 km2.
Die Berechnungen der Autoren für die Versor-
gung Deutschlands mit Solar-PV aus der Sahara
sind wie folgt (bereinigt um die Annahme A5. c
und die Sonneneinstrahlung in den verschiede-
nen Regionen gemäß Abb. 1):
1. Südspanien ~1.900 W/m2/p.a.
2. Südkalifornien ~2.900 W/m2/p.a.
3. Sahara ~2.300 to 2.600 W/m2/p.a.
4. Indien ~1.300 to 1.900 W/m2/p.a.
5. Südost(Asien) <1.500 W/m2/p.a.
(z.B. Indonesien, Vietnam, Thailand, Myan-
mar, Malaysia)
Die erste Beobachtung zeigt, dass Indien und
Südost(Asien) generell schlechtere Sonnen-
scheinbedingungen haben als Südspanien. Dies
ist vor allem eine Folge des Monsuns. Abgesehen
von einer Region im Zentrum liegt die DNI in der
Sahara am 22 ºN Breitengrad der DNI-Karte zu-
folge niedrigerer als in Südkalifornien aber über
der Spaniens (Abb. 1). Allerdings haben weder
MacKay noch die Autoren des energypost.eu
Artikels die folgenden Hauptprobleme der Sahara
bzw. jeder in einer Wüste gelegenen Solaranlage
berücksichtigt: Wassermangel, fehlende Infra-
struktur, hohe Temperaturen, Dunst, Staub und
vor allem Sandstürme.
Das Unternehmen Nomadd16, das im Jahr 2012 an
der saudi-arabischen King Abdullah University
of Science & Technology gegründet wurde, hat
sich intensiv mit diesem Thema beschäftigt und
kommt zu dem Schluss: „Staubentwicklung ist die
größte technische Herausforderung für eine lebens-
fähige Solarindustrie in der Wüste. Staub verursacht
einen Ausbeutungsverlust von 0,4-0,8% pro Tag.
Während und nach Sandstürmen wurden Rückgänge
der Energieausbeute von 60% berichtet. Wenn sie
nicht innerhalb eines Tages beseitigt werden, haften
Staubpartikel aus organischen Stoen, Tau und Schwe-
fel an den Modulen fest.“ Solar Star in Kalifornien
benötigt jährlich fast 200.000 m3 Wasser, um die
Module vom Staub zu reinigen17. Wenn die Staub-
bedingungen in der Sahara vergleichbar wären
(sie sind viel schwerwiegender), dann müsste
der Niederschlag auf einer Fläche von etwa 250
km2 gesammelt und zur Reinigung verwendet
werden, was weitere Lager- und Verteilungsein-
richtungen erfordern würde.
Zahlreiche von unabhängigen Gutachtern über-
prüfte Studien untersuchten die Auswirkungen
von Sandstürmen auf große Solarparks in der
Wüste. Bislang wurde noch keine kommerziell
tragfähige Lösung für großächige Anlagen
gefunden. Das saudi-arabische Unternehmen
Nomadd behauptet jedoch, dass das Nomadd-
System16 auch ohne Wasser arbeiten und ein
Solarmodul innerhalb von zwei Stunden reinigen
kann. Das System wurde noch nicht in großem
Maßstab implementiert und Details zu den
Kosten und dem Wartungsaufwand sowie dem
Abrieb der Moduloberäche sind noch nicht ver-
fügbar. Elektrostatische Methoden zur Staubent-
fernung von PV-Modulen, wie sie von ACWA in
Saudi-Arabien geplant sind, wurden untersucht
und sind vielversprechend. Dabei wären keine be-
weglichen Teile oder Wasser erforderlich18. Diese
Methoden reduzieren zwar die Notwendigkeit
der Reinigung mit Wasser und Tensiden, werden
sie vermutlich aber nicht vollständig ersetzen
können.
Darüber hinaus erreichen die Temperaturen in
der Wüste regelmäßig Werte von über 50 ºC. In
Verbindung mit der Erwärmung durch die ab-
sorbierte Sonnenenergie sinkt der Wirkungsgrad
der Module über 0 ºC19. um mindestens 0,5% pro
weiterem ºC. Das bedeutet, dass der typische
Anstieg der Temperatur von 10 ºC am Morgen
auf 50 ºC am Nachmittag einen Wirkungsgrad-
verlust von bis zu 20% verursacht. Dies erfordert
eine noch größere PV-Sahara um den Energie-
bedarf der Welt zu decken. Außerdem belastet
die ständige Ausdehnung-Kontraktion durch die
Tageszyklen von über 35 ºC die elektrischen und
physikalischen Verbindungen der Module, was
zu Ausfällen führt. Die Lebensdauer von PV-Mo-
dulen in der Sahara-Wüste liegt wahrscheinlich
weit unter den üblichen 15 Jahren. Die NASA20
kommt zu dem Schluss, dass „Solarenergie in der
Wüste einige Herausforderungen mit sich bringt. Laut
IEEE Spectrum können extrem hohe Temperaturen
manchmal Wechselrichter beschädigen, die den von der
Photovoltaik-Anlage erzeugten Gleichstrom in den für
das Netz benötigten Wechselstrom umwandeln. Auch
Hochspannungstransformatoren können bei hohen
Temperaturen an Ezienz verlieren und ausfallen.“
Selbst wenn man davon ausgeht, dass Staub,
Dunst und Sandstürme keine Probleme darstellen
und man einen Sahara/CA-DNI-Faktor von 1,1x
unterstellt und der Winter-Nutzungsgrad auf
einen optimistischen Wert von 1,3 reduziert wird,
ergibt sich folgendes Ergebnis:
Die gesamte erforderliche Anpassung im Ver-
gleich zu Kalifornien beträgt 1,6 x 1,5 x 1,3 x 1,1 x
1,3 = 4,5x. Damit liegt die benötigte Gesamtäche
für PV-Sahara für die Deckung des Strombe-
darfs von Deutschland bei ~19.000 km2 (4,5 x
4.220 = 18.990 km2). Um die gesamte Welt (27.000
TWh vs. Deutschland 550 TWh) mit Solarstrom
Abb. 3: Landwirtschaftliche Anbauächen weltweit und in Spanien, anteilige Anbauächen.
Quellen: Ramankutty und Foley 1999, Cropland Intensity 1992, Stand 12. November 2020, abrufbar unter diesem Link;
sowie Castillo et al., An Assessment and Spatial Modelling of Agricultural Land Abandonment in Spain (2015–2030), Stand 12. November 2020, abrufbar unter diesem Link.
Anteil landwirtschaftlich
genutzter Fläche an der
Gesamtäche
Anteile
< 20%
20%-30%
30%-40%
40%-50%
> 50%
4
Keine Ackerächen Ausschließlich Ackerächen
Anteil der Ackeräche pro Gitterzelle
aus der Sahara zu versorgen, müsste man die
19.000 km2 mit 49 multiplizieren und käme so auf
~1.000.000 km2. Das entspricht der Hälfte der von
MacKay angenommenen Fläche, weil dieser den
durchschnittlichen Verbrauch Europas auf die
gesamte Welt hochgerechnet hat. Gegenwärtig ha-
ben aber über 600 Millionen Menschen in Afrika
überhaupt keinen Zugang zu Elektrizität. Dabei
ist zu berücksichtigen, dass sowohl die obige Be-
rechnung als auch MacKays Zahlen eigentlich zu
optimistisch sind, da es nicht nur an Wasser und
Infrastruktur mangelt. Auch die hohen Tempe-
raturen, Dunst, Staub und Sandstürme müssten
berücksichtig werden.
Ein großächiger Solarpark in der Sahara würde
sich negativ auf das Klima auswirken, da er die
Atmosphäre spürbar um ~1 ºC erwärmen würde,
wie Lu et al. in ihrer Studie „Impacts of Large-
Scale Sahara Solar Farms on Global Climate and
Vegetation Cover12“ vom Dezember 2020 darle-
gen. Zudem wäre die Speicherung und Übertra-
gung des Stroms zu den Verbrauchern rund um
den Globus deutlich schwieriger und in keinem
Szenario wären genügend Rohstoe vorhanden,
um die benötigten Solarmodule für den weltwei-
ten Strombedarf bauen zu können.
Konzentrierte Solarenergie (Concentrated Solar
Power – CSP; im Wesentlichen ein „Sonnenofen“,
bei dem das Sonnenlicht auf ein Ziel fokussiert
wird, um dieses zu erhitzen) scheint keine
tragfähige Alternative zu sein, wie zahlreiche
Ezienzprobleme mit den CSP-Anlagen in
Kalifornien zeigen. Der Vorschlag eines hybriden
PV-CSP-Systems würde den verbleibenden Teil
des Sonnenspektrums, den das Silizium nicht
absorbieren kann, nutzen, um Wasser für einen
Rankine-Zyklus-Motor zu erhitzen. Ivanpah und
andere CSP-Anlagen in Kalifornien produzieren
im Winter wenig Strom, da der Nutzungsgrad
saisonbedingt um den Faktor 7 sinkt.21 Daher
würde die Nutzung nur eines kleinen Teils des
Sonnenspektrums noch inezienter sein. Ein hyb-
rider Ansatz könnte im Zusammenhang mit der
Produktion von Wassersto in Betracht gezogen
werden.
3.4. Wasserstoff und PV-Spanien
Durch Elektrolyse kann aus der überschüssigen
Stromerzeugung von PV-Spanien im Sommer
Wassersto (H2) produziert werden. Europäische
Regierungen haben die Vorstellung, dass „grüner
Wassersto“ durch die synthetische Produktion
von H2 als Energieträger das Problem der nicht
kontinuierlichen Verfügbarkeit von Wind und
Sonne lösen wird. Mit der heutigen Technologie
sind jedoch die geringe volumetrische Energiedich-
te von Wassersto und die hohen Transportkosten
ein Hindernis für den breiten Einsatz von H2.
Die komprimierte Speicherung von H2 erfordert
hochbelastbare Speicherbehälter aus Materialien,
die nicht spröde werden, wenn H2 in das Material
eindringt. Um H2 zu komprimieren oder zu ver-
üssigen und zu transportieren, wird Energie be-
nötigt – Energie, die auch aus der in den Sommer-
monaten verfügbaren überschüssigen Energie aus
PV-Spanien gewonnen werden muss.
Bezüglich des Transports kamen Bossel et al.22 zu
folgendem Schluss: „Bei einem Druck von 200 bar
liefert ein 40-Tonnen-Lkw etwa 3,2 Tonnen Methan,
aber aufgrund der geringen Dichte von Wassersto
und dem Gewicht der Druckbehälter und der Sicher-
heitsarmaturen nur 320 kg H2. Um H2 durch eine
Pipeline zu transportieren, wird etwa 4,6-mal mehr
Energie benötigt als für den Transport von Erdgas.“
Erdgaspipelines können durch den Transport von
H2 beschädigt werden. H2 neigt dazu, in Stahl-
rohre einzudringen, was sie spröde macht und die
Ausfallrate erhöht. ACWA plant in Saudi-Arabien,
Ammoniak in Kombination mit H2 zu produzie-
ren, um die Transportprobleme von Wassersto23
zu verringern. Die Wirksamkeit dieses hybriden
H2-NH3-Konzepts wurde hier nicht untersucht.
An dieser Stelle sei jedoch angemerkt, dass in den
vergangenen Jahren beachtliche Forschungsergeb-
nisse und Fortschritte in Bezug auf sogenannte
„Wasserstoschwämme“ erzielt wurden (siehe
Morris et al. 2019 und Northwestern University
als Beispiel24). Einige Kandidaten scheinen einen
Gewichtsanteil von 8% an dem H2 zu erreichen.
Die verwendeten Materialien sind relativ kosten-
günstig und ausreichend vorhanden, wie zum
Beispiel Übergangsmetalle und Kohlenstogitter
als Gerüst für die Metalle. In nicht allzu ferner
Zukunft versprechen diese Ansätze eine
„H2-Revolution“, die ein geeignetes Medium zur
dichten Speicherung von H2 ermöglichen wird.
Dies würde eine potenziell tragfähige Alternative
zur Speicherung in Lithium-Ionen-Batterien dar-
stellen. So enthält eine 500 kg schwere Tesla-Batte-
rie weniger als 100 kWh Energie. Der metallorga-
nische H2-“Tank“ mit einem Gewichtsanteil von
8% an dem H2 enthält etwa 1.300 kWh Energie,
also mehr als das 13-fache der Energiedichte der
Tesla-Lithium-Ionen-Batterie. Das entspräche
einer Reichweite von über 4.000 km. Das Tanken
wäre dann nicht mehr eine tägliche Aufgabe.
Mit einer Fläche von ~35.000 km2 ist PV-Spa-
nien überdimensioniert um den für Deutschland
benötigte Strom im Winter zu erzeugen. Die Über-
schussleistung ist im Hochwinter nominell Null
und steigt im Hochsommer auf ein Maximum
an. Über ein Jahr betrachtet, produziert etwa die
Hälfte von PV-Spanien überschüssigen Strom,
der für die Produktion von Wassersto genutzt
werden könnte.
Bei einem durchschnittlichen jährlichen Nut-
zungsgrad für Spanien von 16,5% (siehe A6)
produziert PV-Spanien mit 2.000 GW installierter
Leistung etwa 2.900 TWhDC Strom (2.000 GW
x 16,5% x 8.760h = 2.891 TWh). Anstelle des
Backups mit Batterien kann in Deutschland
Wassersto in der Nähe des Verbrauchsortes
erzeugt werden. Die Elektrolyse von H2O zu
H2 und die anschließende Verwendung von H2
in einer Brennstozelle könnte einen Gesamt-
wirkungsgrad von ~40% erreichen. Durch die
Umwandlung von Gleichstrom in Wechselstrom
und die Übertragung ergeben sich zusätzlich
noch Verluste von 30%. Somit würde PV-Spa-
nien jährlich ~800 TWh Strom in Deutschland
durch H2 erzeugen. Dies würde das gesamte
oben berechnete Batterie-Backup ersetzen und
für den gesamten deutschen Stromverbrauch
plus einen großen Teil des Energiebedarfs für den
Transportsektor ausreichen. Die andere Option
wäre, „nur“ den in PV-Spanien produzierten
Überschussstrom von ~1.450 TWh (die Hälfte von
2.900 TWhDC) zu nutzen und diesen in ~600 TWh
nutzbaren Wassersto für den Transportsektor
umzuwandeln (unter der Annahme eines Verlusts
von 30% für die Umwandlung von Gleichstrom
in Wechselstrom und die Übertragung und einen
Wirkungsgrad der Elektrolyse von 60%). Die oben
angesprochenen physikalischen Herausforderun-
gen des ezienten H2-Transports über größere
Entfernungen blieben jedoch bestehen.
Die Autoren weisen darauf hin, dass eine wasser-
stobasierte Speicherlösung nicht die grundlegen-
den Probleme der in diesem Beitrag dargestellten
Solaranlagen löst, die vor allem im hohen Roh-
stoeinsatz, der geringen Energiedichte und dem
niedrigen eROeI bestehen.
4. Bedarf an Rohmaterial
Für die Solarmodule: Die weltweite Produktion
von Silizium liegt seit 2010 bei etwa 7,5 Millionen
Tonnen pro Jahr25. Für ein Solarmodul mit einer
Nominalkapazität von 1 kW und 6-7 m2 werden
etwa 2-4 kg Si benötigt26. Die Autoren rechnen mit
2 kg und 7m2 bzw. 0,29 kg Si pro m2 Solarmodul.
Das bedeutet, dass mit der derzeitigen weltweiten
Siliziumproduktion 26.000.000.000 m2 bzw. 26.000
km2 an Solarmodulen jährlich (7.500.000.000 kg
Silizium ÷ 0,29 kg/m2) hergestellt werden können.
Um die für Deutschland einmalig benötigten
35.000 km2 und dann jährlich benötigten 2.300
km2 Solarmodule herzustellen, wären einmalig
~10 Millionen Tonnen Silizium oder die 1,35-fa-
che Menge der weltweiten Silizium-Jahrespro-
duktion erforderlich und anschließend dauer-
haft ~660.000 Tonnen Silizium jährlich oder 9%
der jetzigen weltweiten Siliziumproduktion.
Natürlich bliebe dann kaum mehr Silizium übrig,
um andere weltweit benötigte siliziumbasierte
Produkte wie Computerchips oder Glas herzustel-
len. Eine Anmerkung: Polykristalline Silizium-
Dünnschichten könnten größere Photovoltaik-
Flächen ermöglichen, würden aber nach heutigem
Stand nur die Hälfte des Quantenwirkungsgrades
und eine geringere Stabilität aufweisen, was einen
häugeren Austausch erfordern würde.
Für die Produktion von Solarpaneelen wird neben
Silizium auch hochqualitatives Silber benötigt,
das vorwiegend in Lateinamerika und China
hergestellt wird. Laut CRU wurden in 2019 etwa
Abb. 4: Typische Stromnachfragekurve und Photovoltaikerzeugung. Die PV-Spitze muss ungefähr das Doppelte der Nachfragespitze betragen.
Quelle: Nominale Stromnachfragekurve und PV-Erzeugungsschema der Autoren, angepasst auf Basis EnergyMag, Stand 12. November 2020,
abrufbar unter diesem Link.
Stromnachfragekurve und benötigte PV-Erzeugung
01234567891011 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
kW
Stunden des Tages
Stromverbrauch
PV-Erzeugung
Schwarzer Bereich Roter Bereich
5
11% der weltweiten Silberproduktion von 27.000
Tonnen in Solarpaneelen verarbeitet, wobei für
eine Solarzelle etwa 0,1 mg Silber benötigt wer-
den27. Ausgehend von 72 Zellen pro 2 m2, würden
7 g Silber für eine Paneele von 2 m2 oder 3,5
Tonnen pro km2 benötigt. Um die für Deutschland
einmalig benötigten 35.000 km2 und dann jährlich
benötigten 2.300 km2 Solarmodule herzustellen,
wären einmalig ~120.000 Tonnen Silber oder
die 4,5-fache Menge der weltweiten Silber-Jah-
resproduktion erforderlich und anschließend
dauerhaft ~8.000 Tonnen Silber jährlich oder
~30% der jetzigen weltweiten Silberproduktion.
Zudem wäre die Rückgewinnung von Silber
aus recycelten Paneelen notwendig. Zu einem
ähnlichen Ergebnis kommt auch Zoltan Ban28,
der von einem zweimal so hohen Silberbedarf
ausgeht. Nach heutigem Stand führt der Einsatz
von alternativen Materialien wie Aluminium oder
organischen Halbleitern nach wie vor zu einer
verminderten Ezienz und Lebensdauer der So-
larpaneelen. Um den Strombedarf der EU decken
zu können, müssten die oben genannten Zahlen
um ein Sechsfaches erhöht werden.
Für die Batterien: Zur groben Berechnung des
Materialbedarfs für einen Batteriepark mit
45 TWh Nominalkapazität unter Verwendung
von Teslas neuester Technologie wird angenom-
men, dass das Gewicht einer Tesla-Batterie mit 85
kWh Kapazität etwa 500 kg beträgt, was einem
Faktor von 5,9 kg pro kWh entspricht29. Die Auto-
ren haben das Batteriegewicht großzügigerweise
für alle folgenden Berechnungen auf 250 kg hal-
biert, und somit auf einen aktuell noch unmöglich
zu erreichenden Faktor von 2,9 kg pro kWh.
Ausgehend von der Annahme, dass 1-2% des
abgebauten Erzes nach der Verarbeitung in Form
von Metallen in der Batterie tatsächlich genutzt
werden (A7.a) und unter Berücksichtigung der
Gewichtshalbierung, bedeutet dies für eine
50-GWh-Fabrik, dass jährlich 8-15 Millionen
Tonnen Rohstoe wie z.B. Lithium, Kupfer,
Kobalt, Nickel, Graphit, Seltene Erden & Bauxit,
Kohle und Eisenerz (für Aluminium und Stahl)
abgebaut, transportiert und verarbeitet werden
müssten. Außerdem würde der Abbau, der Trans-
port und die Verarbeitung dieser Rohstoe noch
zusätzlich beachtliche Energie erfordern.
Insgesamt entspricht die Menge an Rohstoen,
die für die Herstellung des 14-Tages-Batterie-
Backups für PV-Spainen nötig wären, dem ein-
maligen Bedarf von 900 Gigafactories (45 TWh)
bzw. 7-13 Milliarden Tonnen und im Anschluss
dem dauerhaften Bedarf von 45 Gigafactories
(2,25 TWh) bzw. 0,4-0,7 Milliarden Tonnen Roh-
stoen pro Jahr. Allein für die Ersatzbatterien für
Deutschland (und etwas mehr als 15% der EU),
das einen Anteil von 1% an der Gesamtbevölke-
rung hat, wären 0,5-1% aller weltweit geförderten
Rohstoe im Umfang von 92 Milliarden Tonnen
nötig30. Um den Speicherbedarf der gesamten
Europäischen Union zu decken, müssen die oben
genannten Zahlen mit sechs multipliziert werden.
Weitere Materialien, um die benötigten 2,25 TWh
Batteriekapazität pro Jahr dauerhaft für Deutsch-
land zu produzieren, beinhalten31:
~6x die aktuelle globale Lithium-Produk-
tion (~880 Tonnen Lithium pro 1 GWh,
Produktion 2020: ca. 320.000 Tonnen, ~70%
aus China),
~22x die aktuelle globale Graphitanoden-
Produktion (~1.200 Tonnen Graphitanoden
pro 1 GWh, Produktion 2020: ca. 210.000
Tonnen, ~80% aus China),
~2x die aktuelle globale Kobalt-Produktion
(~100 Tonnen Kobalt pro 1 GWh, Produktion
2020: ca. 120.000 Tonnen, ~80% aus China), und
~8x die aktuelle globale Nickelsulfat-
Produktion (~800 Tonnen Nickelsulfat pro
1GWh, Produktion 2020: ca. 230.000 Tonnen32,
~60% aus China).
5. Fazit
Überlegungen zur Sicherheit, Flächennutzung,
Rohstobedarf sowie Umweltaspekte machen PV-
Spanien zu einer schlechten Wahl bei der Lösung
des deutschen, europäischen oder gar globalen
Energiedilemmas. Weder der Materialbedarf für
die Solarpaneelen (allen voran Silber und Sili-
zium) noch der für die Batterien könnte gedeckt
werden. Dabei wurde der Energiebedarf für den
Bau und die Wartung der Paneele oder Batterien
einer so großen Solaranlage in Spanien – auch als
energy-Return-On-energy-Invested (eROeI) be-
zeichnet – noch nicht berücksichtigt.
Wenn es nicht sinnvoll ist, den deutschen Strom-
bedarf (oder etwas mehr als 15% des EU-Bedarfs)
durch Solarstrom aus Spanien zu decken, warum
sollte es dann sinnvoll sein, auch nur einen
Bruchteil des Strombedarfs von Solaranlagen zu
beziehen, die nördlich von Spanien, in Indien
oder in Asien installiert sind, wo die natürlichen
Sonneneinstrahlungsbedingungen noch viel un-
günstiger sind als in Spanien?33
Alternativen zur heute herrschenden Solar-Tech-
nologie sowie umfassendere Forschung vor allem
zum Material- und Energieeinsatz sind nötig,
damit die vorgeschlagene Energiewende weg
von konventioneller Energie realisierbar wird.
Solarenergie kann eine umweltfreundliche und
wirtschaftliche Option für den Energiebedarf an
Orten sein, die keinen Zugang zu großen Strom-
netzen haben, oder um bestimmte nicht-kritische
Energiebedarfe aufzustocken.
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0Jan Feb Mär Apr Mai Jun Jul Aug Sep Okt Nov Dez
Kapazitätsfaktor der Photovoltaikanlagen in Kalifornien von 2018-2020
Monatlicher Kapazitätsfaktor in %
1 Schätzungen laut Agora und europa.eu, Stand 4. September 2020, abruf-
bar unter Link und Link.
2 Deutschlands Spitzenenergiebedarf erreicht bis zu 82 GW während der
Winterzeit laut Wikipedia, Agora, BMWI und entso-e,
Stand 3. Januar 2021.
3 Fakten zu Solar Star und den weltweit größten Solarparks,
Stand 3. Januar 2021, abrufbar hier Link und hier Link.
4 Solargis: Solar Irradiance Data, Stand 3. Januar 2021, abrufbar hier Link.
5 Aleo Solar: Solar panel lifespan – The 6 things to know,
Stand 3. Januar 2021, abrufbar hier Link.
6 Nevada Gigafactory hoping to achieve 40 GWh output according to Rich
Duprey, The Motley Fool, Stand 4. September 2020, abrufbar hier Link.
7 Zu diesem Thema gibt es nicht viel Forschung; diese Annahme erscheint
realistisch und konservativ und wurde von den Autoren überprüft. Siehe
Mark Mills, März 2019, Stand 4. September 2020, abrufbar hier Link und
hier Link.
8 Beim Start eines Autos beispielsweise verfügt eine 500 Ah versiegelte Blei-
Säure-Batterie (SLA) über einen Pulsausgang von mehreren Amper, sollte
jedoch über 5 Stunden bei ~0,2C geladen werden, d.h. mit ~100 Amper. Eine
Entladungsrate einer Lithium-Ionen-Batterie von 1C bedeutet, dass eine voll-
ständig geladene 1 Ah Batterie eine Stunde lang ein Amper (das entspricht
einem Fluss von 1 Coulomb pro Sekunde) zur Verfügung stellt. Bei einer
Verbundbatterie, die aus 100 x 1 Ah Lithium-Ionen-Batterien besteht und
somit eine Kapazität von 100 Ah hat, entspricht 1C einer Entladungsrate
von 100 Amper für eine Stunde. Eine Rate von 5C für eine solche Batterie
entspräche 500 Amper und eine Rate von C/2 wären 50 Amper. LautTesla
halten Lithium-Ionen-Batterien Laderaten von bis zu 10C stand.
9 Hagopian: Battery Degradation and Power Loss, BatteryEducation.com,
April 2006, Stand 3. Januar 2021, abrufbar hier Link.
10 BatteryUniversity: What’s the Best Battery?, März 2017,
Stand 3. Januar 2021, abrufbar hier Link.
11 Brook: The Catch-22 of Energy Storage, Energy Central on eROeI,
August 2014, Stand 3. Januar 2021, abrufbar hier Link.
12 Lu et al.: Impacts of Large-Scale Sahara Solar Farms on Global Climate and
Vegetation Cover; AGU Research Letter, Dec 2020, Stand 15. Februar 2021,
abrufbar hier Link; außerdem Li et al.: Climate model shows large-scale
wind and solar farms in the Sahara increase rain and vegetation, Science
Magazine, Sep 2018, Stand 15. Februar 2021, abrufbar hier Link.
13 Die weltweit installierte Gesamt-Solarkapazität belief sich laut IEA auf
etwa 715 GW in 2020, Stand 3. Januar 2021, abrufbar hier Link.
14 Energy Post: 10,000 sq km of Solar in the Sahara, Mai 2020,
Stand 5. Januar 2021, abrufbar hier Link.
15 David MacKay: Sustainable Energy — without the hot air,
November 2008, Stand 5. Januar 2021, abrufbar hier Link.
16 NOMADD: The Desert Solar Challenge, Stand 5. Januar 2021,
abrufbar hier Link.
17 BHE Renewables: Just the Facts – Solar Star Projects, März 2017,
Stand 15. Januar 2021, abrufbar hier Link.
18 Kawamoto: Electrostatic cleaning equipment for dust removal from soiled
solar panels, Journal of Electrostatics, Band 98, März 2019,
S. 11-16, Stand 15. Januar 2021, abrufbar hier Link.
19 Moharram et al.: Enhancing the performance of photovoltaic panels by
water cooling, Ain Shams Engineering Journal, Band 4, Ausgabe 4,
Dezember 2013, S. 869-877, Stand 5. Januar 2021, abrufbar hier Link.
20 Nasa.gov: Catching Rays in the Desert, Stand 5. Januar 2021,
abrufbar hier Link.
21 Informationen zur Ivanpah Solar Power Facility, Stand 15. Januar 2021,
abrufbar hier Link.
22 Bossel et al..: The Future of the Hydrogen Economy: Bright or Bleak?, Co-
generation and Competitive Power Journal Volume 18, Ausgabe 3, 2003,
Stand 10. Januar 2021, abrufbar hier Link.
23 Air Products: ACWA Power and NEOM Sign Agreement for $5 Billion
Production Facility, Juli 2020, Stand 18. Januar 2021,
abrufbar hier Link.
24 Northwestern University: Gas storage method could help next-generation
clean energy vehicles, April 2020, Stand 10. Januar 2021, abrufbar hier
Link; und Morris et al.: A manganese hydride molecular sieve for practical
hydrogen storage under ambient conditions,
Energy & Environmental Science, Ausgabe 5, 2019, 10. Januar 2021,
abrufbar hier Link.
25 Statista: Silicon production worldwide from 2010 to 2019,
Stand 22. Februar 2021, abrufbar hier Link.
26 Stack Exchange, Stand 4. September 2020, abrufbar hier Link.
27 The Silver Institute: Market Trend Report, June 2020, Stand
15. Oktober 2020, abrufbar hier Link; und Statista: Global mine production
of silver from 2005 to 2019, Stand 22. Februar 2021, abrufbar hier Link.
28 Zoltan Ban: Not Enough Silver To Power The World Even If Solar Power
Eciency Were To Quadruple, Seeking Alpha, Februar 2017, Stand 4.
November 2020, abrufbar hier Link.
29 Teslas Powerwalls, die für die Notstromversorgung ausgelegt sind, haben
tatsächlich eine Kapazität von 13,5 kWh und ein Gewicht einschließ-
lich des Rahmens von 114 kg. Geht man von 100 kg Nettogewicht der
Batterie aus, entspricht dies 7,4 kg pro kWh, was im Vergleich zu Teslas
Autobatterien weniger eektiv ist (lassen Sie uns großzügig sein und dies
vernachlässigen).
30 WU Vienna (2020): Material ows by material group, 1970-2017, Stand
4. Januar 2021, abrufbar hier Link.
31 Benchmark Mineral Intelligence Daten 2020, Stand 3. Januar 2021,
abrufbar hier Link und hier Link.
32 Trotz der Größe des Gesamtnickelmarktes (etwas mehr als 2,3 Millionen
Tonnen) wird nur ein geringer Anteil als Nickelsulfat für die Nutzung in
Lithium-Ionen-Batterien chemisch aufbereitet, siehe auch Fußnote 30 für
weitere Details.
33 Der neueste 180 MV Solarpark von ENBW in Brandenburg, Deutsch-
land, auf einem Breitengrad von 50 ºN wird nicht in der Lage sein, die
geplante Energiemenge mit einem realisierbaren Materialeinsatz zu
produzieren. Eine Projektbeschreibung ndet sich bei ENBW, Stand 20.
Januar 2021, abrufbar hier Link.
34 Bine Information Services, Stand 4. September 2020, abrufbar hier Link;
und PV Education, Stand 4. Oktober 2020, abrufbar hier Link.
6
Anmerkung: Für die Herstellung von Silizium werden im Wesent-
lichen hochwertiges Quarzgestein, Holzspäne und Kohle benötigt.
Silizium ist das am zweithäugsten vorkommende Element in der
Erdkruste, allerdings kann bis jetzt nur das hochreine Quarzgestein
wirtschaftlich abgebaut und in Silikonprodukte umgewandelt
werden. Rohsilizium (MG-Si, etwa 98% Reinheit) wird bei einer
Temperatur von mehr als 2.000 ºC in Lichtbogenöfen verarbeitet.
In einem Veredelungsverfahren (z.B. “Siemens-Verfahren”) werden
daraus dann sowohl Solar-Silizium (SoG-Si, 99,9999 Reinheit) als
auch Halbleitersilizium (EG-Si, 99,9999999% Reinheit) gewonnen.
Ein Prozess, der wiederum hohe Mengen an Energie und den Ein-
satz von Chemikalien erfordert.34
Abb. 5: Kapazitätsfaktor der Photovoltaikanlagen in Kalifornien von 2018-2020. Anmerkung: Die Werte bis einschließlich 2019 sind nal, die
Werte für 2020 noch vorläug. Für 2020 wurden nur die Monate Januar bis November berücksichtigt.
Quelle: EIA, Stand 3. Januar 2021, abrufbar unter diesem Link.
Average
2018
2019
2020
... In this optimistic scenario, where the generation of renewable energy will quickly become cheaper, the matter of intermittency comes to mind, as does the imperative need for cost-effective and reliable energy storage. Schernikau and Smith (2021) highlighted the enormous difficulties and practical issues related to one source of renewable energy-solar photovoltaic panels. They focused on Germany as a case study and showed that supplying Germany's electricity demand entirely from solar photovoltaic panels (located in Spain, the optimal region for the production of solar energy due to the high direct normal solar irradiation), considering several adjustment factors (peak power, backup peak, transmission loss, winter capacity, etc.), would require a total area of approximately 35,000 km 2 (7% of Spain s surface area) covered with solar photovoltaic panels. ...
... In addition, one cannot ignore the fact that solar photovoltaic panels last, on average, 15 years and would require replacement every 15 years. Schernikau and Smith (2021) further estimated that the annual silicon and silver requirements for such a scenario would require close to 10% and 30% of the current global production capacity, respectively. This seems to be an unrealistic and unachievable scenario which will worsen once we add estimations of resource requirements for the production and installation of battery backup systems. ...
... This seems to be an unrealistic and unachievable scenario which will worsen once we add estimations of resource requirements for the production and installation of battery backup systems. Advancing this scenario to cover about 40% (200,000 km 2 ) of Spain with solar photovoltaic panels in order to supply the entire European electricity demand, as suggested by Schernikau and Smith (2021), how would all the energy produced be stored? ...
Chapter
The transition from fossil fuel-dominant energy production to so-called carbon-neutral sources has been identified as an important new challenge seeking to address climate change. Climate change, specifically global warming, is presently considered as being intimately related to carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, especially those of an anthropogenic origin. The issue of CO2 emissions of an anthropogenic origin from the combustion of fossil fuels remains rather controversial, due to the following main reasons: other greenhouse gases (GHGs) such as methane (CH4) produce a more negative environmental effect than CO2, and natural causes such as the sun and volcanic activities also play an important role. In addition, an important part of CO2 emissions is unrelated to energy production, but concerns other industries such as chemical and cement production. Furthermore, it should be stated that there still exists considerable disagreement in climate models and scenarios used by the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). A workable and viable strategy towards the production of clean energy must include the capture and storage of CO2 as one of the main targets in the energy and climate binomial strategy, despite facing criticism from some environmental organizations. The contribution of geology is not only related to the need of carbon capture and storage technologies, as already admitted in the Paris Agreement, but also to the exploitation of mineral raw materials essential to build renewable energy equipments, and, ultimately, to the underground energy storage associated to hydrogen energy production.
... In this optimistic scenario, where the generation of renewable energy will quickly become cheaper, the matter of intermittency comes to mind, as does the imperative need for cost-effective and reliable energy storage. Schernikau and Smith (2021) highlighted the enormous difficulties and practical issues related to one source of renewable energy-solar photovoltaic panels. They focused on Germany as a case study and showed that supplying Germany's electricity demand entirely from solar photovoltaic panels (located in Spain, the optimal region for the production of solar energy due to the high direct normal solar irradiation), considering several adjustment factors (peak power, backup peak, transmission loss, winter capacity, etc.), would require a total area of approximately 35,000 km 2 (7% of Spain s surface area) covered with solar photovoltaic panels. ...
... In addition, one cannot ignore the fact that solar photovoltaic panels last, on average, 15 years and would require replacement every 15 years. Schernikau and Smith (2021) further estimated that the annual silicon and silver requirements for such a scenario would require close to 10% and 30% of the current global production capacity, respectively. This seems to be an unrealistic and unachievable scenario which will worsen once we add estimations of resource requirements for the production and installation of battery backup systems. ...
... This seems to be an unrealistic and unachievable scenario which will worsen once we add estimations of resource requirements for the production and installation of battery backup systems. Advancing this scenario to cover about 40% (200,000 km 2 ) of Spain with solar photovoltaic panels in order to supply the entire European electricity demand, as suggested by Schernikau and Smith (2021), how would all the energy produced be stored? ...
Chapter
Full-text available
The forest industry is an energy-intensive sector that emits approximately 2% of industrial fossil CO2 emissions worldwide. In Finland, the forest industry is a major contributor to wellbeing and has constantly worked on sustainability issues for several decades. The intensity of fossil fuel use has been continuously decreasing within the sector; however, there is still a lot of potential to contribute to the mitigation of environmental change. Considering the ambitious Finnish climate target to reach carbon-neutrality by 2035, the forest industry is aiming for net-zero emissions by switching fossil fuels to bio-based alternatives and reducing energy demand by improving energy efficiency. Modern pulp mills are expanding the traditional concept of pulp mills by introducing the effective combination of multifunctional biorefineries and energy plants. Sustainably sourced wood resources are used to produce not only pulp and paper products but also electricity and heat as well as different types of novel high-value products, such as biofuels, textile fibres, biocomposites, fertilizers, and various cellulose and lignin derivatives. Thus, the forest industry provides a platform to tackle global challenges and substitute greenhouse-gas-intensive materials and fossil fuels with renewable alternatives.
Article
Full-text available
A viable hydrogen economy has thus far been hampered by the lack of an inexpensive and convenient hydrogen storage solution meeting all requirements, especially in the areas of long hauls and delivery infrastructure. Current approaches require high pressure and/or complex heat management systems to achieve acceptable storage densities. Herein we present a manganese hydride molecular sieve that can be readily synthesized from inexpensive precursors and demonstrates a reversible excess adsorption performance of 10.5 wt% and 197 kgH2m-3 at 120 bar at ambient temperature with no loss of activity after 54 cycles. Inelastic neutron scattering and computational studies confirm Kubas binding as the principal mechanism. The thermodynamically neutral adsorption process allows for a simple system without the need for heat management using moderate pressure as a toggle. A storage material with these properties will allow the DOE system targets for storage and delivery to be achieved, providing a practical alternative to incumbents such 700 bar systems, which generally provide volumetric storage values of 40 kgH2m-3 or less, while retaining advantages over batteries such as fill time and energy density. Reasonable estimates for production costs and loss of performance due to system implementation project total energy storage costs roughly 5 times cheaper than those for 700 bar tanks, potentially opening doors for increased adoption of hydrogen as an energy vector.
Article
Full-text available
The objective of the research is to minimize the amount of water and electrical energy needed for cooling of the solar panels, especially in hot arid regions, e.g., desert areas in Egypt. A cooling system has been developed based on water spraying of PV panels. A mathematical model has been used to determine when to start cooling of the PV panels as the temperature of the panels reaches the maximum allowable temperature (MAT). A cooling model has been developed to determine how long it takes to cool down the PV panels to its normal operating temperature, i.e., 35 °C, based on the proposed cooling system. Both models, the heating rate model and the cooling rate model, are validated experimentally. Based on the heating and cooling rate models, it is found that the PV panels yield the highest output energy if cooling of the panels starts when the temperature of the PV panels reaches a maximum allowable temperature (MAT) of 45 °C. The MAT is a compromise temperature between the output energy from the PV panels and the energy needed for cooling.
Chapter
We have an addiction to fossil fuels, and it’s not sustainable. The developed world gets 80% of its energy from fossil fuels; Britain, 90%. And this is unsustainable for three reasons. First, easily-accessible fossil fuels will at some point run out, so we’ll eventually have to get our energy from someplace else. Second, burning fossil fuels is having a measurable and very-probably dangerous effect on the climate. Avoiding dangerous climate change motivates an immediate change from our current use of fossil fuels. Third, even if we don’t care about climate change, a drastic reduction in Britain’s fossil fuel consumption would seem a wise move if we care about security of supply: continued rapid use of the North Sea Photo by Terry Cavner. oil and gas reserves will otherwise soon force fossil-addicted Britain to depend on imports from untrustworthy foreigners. (I hope you can hear my tongue in my cheek.) How can we get off our fossil fuel addiction? There’s no shortage of advice on how to “make a difference,” but the public is confused, uncertain whether these schemes are fixes or figleaves. People are rightly suspicious when companies tell us that buying their “green” product means we’ve “done our bit.” They are equally uneasy about national energy strategy. Are “decentralization” and “combined heat and power,” green enough, for example? The government would have us think so. But would these technologies really discharge Britain’s duties regarding climate change? Are windfarms “merely a gesture to prove our leaders’ environmental credentials”? Is nuclear power essential? We need a plan that adds up. The good news is that such plans can be made. The bad news is that implementing them will not be easy.
Hagopian: Battery Degradation and Power Loss
Hagopian: Battery Degradation and Power Loss, BatteryEducation.com, April 2006, Stand 3. Januar 2021, abrufbar hier Link.
Brook: The Catch-22 of Energy Storage
Brook: The Catch-22 of Energy Storage, Energy Central on eROeI, August 2014, Stand 3. Januar 2021, abrufbar hier Link.
Climate model shows large-scale wind and solar farms in the Sahara increase rain and vegetation
  • Lu
Lu et al.: Impacts of Large-Scale Sahara Solar Farms on Global Climate and Vegetation Cover; AGU Research Letter, Dec 2020, Stand 15. Februar 2021, abrufbar hier Link; außerdem Li et al.: Climate model shows large-scale wind and solar farms in the Sahara increase rain and vegetation, Science Magazine, Sep 2018, Stand 15. Februar 2021, abrufbar hier Link.
Total global installed solar capacity in 2020 was 715GW
Total global installed solar capacity in 2020 was 715GW, IEA, accessed 3 Jan 2020.
Just the Facts -Solar Star Projects
  • Bhe Renewables
BHE Renewables: Just the Facts -Solar Star Projects, März 2017, Stand 15. Januar 2021, abrufbar hier Link.
Catching Rays in the Desert
  • Nasa
  • Gov
Nasa.gov: Catching Rays in the Desert, Stand 5. Januar 2021, abrufbar hier Link.