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Infatuation, Romantic Relationship and Learning Behaviour among School Going Adolescents

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The adolescence is an important period in which one's character, behaviour, habits, and future lifestyles are developed. Influence of peer is more than the influence of adults, parents, and teachers in this period. Therefore, this research paper aims to explore the potential impact of infatuation and romantic relation to learning behaviour of school-going adolescents. Total of 108 adolescent students were surveyed using the questionnaire method. Both the primary and secondary data are used in this study and it is descriptive in nature. Result highlights that a majority of the respondents have experienced distraction, stress, and low academic performance due to infatuation and romantic relationship. It has a negative impact on learning behaviour among adolescents undergoing infatuation or romantic relation. It is recommended that creation of awareness among teachers and parents in the school and home to provide appropriate support and care to the adolescents is essential. A flexible environment in the school and home must be created to make the adolescents develop positive behaviour towards learning.
International Journal of Management, Technology, and Social
Sciences (IJMTS), ISSN: 2581-6012, Vol. 6, No. 1, Februar
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2021
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Infatuation, Romantic Relationship and
Learning Behaviour among School Going
Adolescents
Gururaj Ganapati Gouda
1*
, & Laveena D’Mello
2
1
*Research Scholar, Shrinivas University, Mangalore, Karnataka, India.
OrcidID: 0000-0001-9339-5862; Email: gururajitgi@gmail.com
2
Associate Professor, College of Social Sciences & Humanities, Srinivas University,
Mangalore, Karnataka, India.
OrcidID: 0000-0003-1935-002X; Email: lavynoronha@gmail.com
Area/Section: Social Science.
Type of the Paper: Research Paper.
Type of Review: Peer Reviewed as per |C|O|P|E| guidance.
Indexed in: OpenAIRE.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4554589.
Google Scholar Citation: IJMTS.
International Journal of Management, Technology, and Social Sciences (IJMTS)
A Refereed International Journal of Srinivas University, India.
© With Author.
CrossRef DOI: https://doi.org/10.47992/IJMTS.2581.6012.0130
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How to Cite this Paper:
Gururaj Ganapati Gouda & D’Mello, Laveena, (2021).
Infatuation, Romantic Relationship
and Learning Behaviour among School Going Adolescents. International Journal of
Management, Technology, and Social Sciences (IJMTS), 6(1), 71-82. DOI:
http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4554589.
International Journal of Management, Technology, and Social
Sciences (IJMTS), ISSN: 2581-6012, Vol. 6, No. 1, Februar
y
2021
SRINIVAS
PUBLICATION
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Infatuation, Romantic Relationship and Learning
Behaviour among School Going Adolescents
Gururaj Ganapati Gouda
1*
, & Laveena D’Mello
2
1
*Research Scholar, Shrinivas University, Mangalore, Karnataka, India.
OrcidID: 0000-0001-9339-5862; Email: gururajitgi@gmail.com
2
Associate Professor, College of Social Sciences & Humanities, Srinivas University,
Mangalore, Karnataka, India.
OrcidID: 0000-0003-1935-002X; Email: lavynoronha@gmail.com
ABSTRACT
The adolescence is an important period in which one's character, behaviour, habits, and future
lifestyles are developed. Influence of peer is more than the influence of adults, parents, and
teachers in this period. Therefore, this research paper aims to explore the potential impact of
infatuation and romantic relation to learning behaviour of school-going adolescents. Total of
108 adolescent students were surveyed using the questionnaire method. Both the primary and
secondary data are used in this study and it is descriptive in nature. Result highlights that a
majority of the respondents have experienced distraction, stress, and low academic
performance due to infatuation and romantic relationship. It has a negative impact on learning
behaviour among adolescents undergoing infatuation or romantic relation. It is recommended
that creation of awareness among teachers and parents in the school and home to provide
appropriate support and care to the adolescents is essential. A flexible environment in the
school and home must be created to make the adolescents develop positive behaviour towards
learning.
Keywords: Infatuation, Romantic Relationship, Learning Behaviour, Adolescents, and
Academic Performance.
1. INTRODUCTION :
India is the most adolescent populated country in the world and it consists of 243 million individuals
aged 10–19 years. Around 20 percent in its population are adolescents [1]. The teenage or adolescent
period is an important period in everyone’s life. In adolescent period, children get developed character,
habits and future lifestyles. It is also a period in which the influence of the peer group is more than the
influence of adults, parents or teachers [2]. Teenagers like to withdraw themselves from dependency on
parents. Further, this period is also characterized by physical and emotional related behaviours like
attraction towards the opposite sex. When a child enters the adolescent period, it will experience
hormonal variations in its physical and psychological change. The child will start to seek a social
identity and a special consideration in society on the basis of gender [3]. This age also influences the
teenager to be more conscious about their physical appearance, such as dressing, beauty and making
them attractive. Also due to the production of sexual hormones in their body, they naturally attract their
peers who belong to the opposite sex. Even though it is the normal process, teenagers consider such
attraction as love.
Adolescents are highly passionate in such a relationship, which will also result in several psychological
problems in their day-to-day living [4] [5]. Parent's rejection of romantic relationship makes adolescents
become desperate. Even some of them never disclose their relationship with a romantic partner thinking
that it will not be approved by their parents. Sometimes they are helpless even though they knew the
negative impact of their relationship on their academic performance. Janardhana, & Manjula (2018)
found that many adolescents believe that sexual intercourse with their partners is a method to get
marriage approval from their parents [6]. They get influenced from the multiple corners of society, such
as social media, peers and family. Modernized parenting and influence by the external world are causing
adolescents to withdraw themselves from the family. In such situations, adolescents think that they can
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making independent decisions about their physical and mental health. At the same time most
adolescents experience significant challenges that can disturb physical, emotional, and educational
wellbeing. Among these, high-risk behaviours such as romantic relationship and sexual behaviours can
lead to scholastic backwardness [7]. Addressing this issue is an essential responsibility for the social
concern to promote a healthy and positive living of the young population. Family, schools, community
and other responsible stakeholders should consider the behavioural response of adolescents towards
infatuation and its impact on their scholastic performance [8]. Educating them to play a better role in
the family and society, enabling them to develop a heavy and positive peer relationship, creating a sense
of responsibility towards the academic achievement for a better life are the areas to promote a positive
and safe living experience. A positive experience in the early life experience will promote good
characteristic and maturation in adulthood [9] [10].
2. DEVELOPMENT, INFATUATION AND ROMANTIC RELATIONSHIP :
Physical and psychological development in the adolescent period is the determinant for the pattern of
behaviour and set of characteristics that they adopt. These characteristics and patterns of behaviour play
a major role in deciding how an adolescent understand and react for infatuation. Even the society and
peer group influence will also promote a positive attitude towards the opposite sex in the adolescent
period.
2.1. Physical Development:
The most important and noticeable change during physical development is sexual growth, including the
appearance of secondary sexual characteristics and the ability to reproduce. Teenagers with these
physical changes will mainly get attracted by the opposite sex. Physical changes are uncommon in all
levels of the adolescent period [11]. Though, sexual growth among young adolescents triggers for their
romantic relationships with the opposite sex and affect relationships pattern with family members.
Continues engagement in such a relationship also causes negative developmental and unhealthy
academic life. Their immaturity will push them into several physical and mental problems. Mental stress
affects their academic life and social activities [12].
2.2. Psycho-Social Development:
The peer group plays a major role in adolescent’s psycho-social development. They contribute more to
the emotional changes and the relationship pattern that adolescents adopt in their day-to-day life.
Therefore, adolescents seek peers who are more similar to their thoughts and emotions. These peer
group push adolescents into several risks [2]. Thus, adolescents face challenges to balance peer pressure
and family expectations. In such situations, adolescents think that they can make independent decisions
in their personal and social life. They start seeking a supportive relationship with the opposite sex and
stop giving importance to their own family. They also think that they can have more comfort by
developing a romantic relationship with the opposite sex. They are not fully potential to understand the
emotional and physical needs in the process of psycho-social development. This immaturity will trigger
their attention towards love relationship through which they try satisfying their developmental needs.
The behaviour of Infatuation or sexual experimentation risks their autonomy and creates several
challenges to balance their emotional stability. This type of behaviour will also lead to various mental
health problems triggering learning-related distractions [13].
2.3. Cognitive Development:
Changes in cognitive development among adolescents are highly influential to decide their level of
perception and behavioural reactions towards life situations. During this period, adolescents begin to
mature and start thinking independently for their future life. Adolescents with these thinking are prone
to select their romantic partner to have a comfortable experience in their present life. Their limited
cognitive capacity to comprehend and analyze any situations or find appropriate solutions will
maximize the complexity of simple problems. These issues will result in several mental health
challenges even negatively affect the relationship with the peer group, family and romantic partner [14]
[15].
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3. INFATUATION AND SCHOLASTIC PERFORMANCE :
Von Stumm et al., (2011) found in their study that when a human mind is hungry it will try finding the
source of knowledge and will have the best performance in academic [16]. Adolescence is a time to
adopt verity of new behaviours from society without appropriate maturity or knowledge. They tend to
the experimentation in each step of their development, which will also increase risk in their life. Since
adolescence is a time of learning their behavioural pattern play an eminent role to decide their academic
performance and learning involvement. Adolescents underestimate the consequences of such
behaviours (for example, infatuation towards opposite sex). The focus of adolescents towards a
romantic relationship with the opposite sex will directly or indirectly affects their learning aspects.
Adolescents neglected by both the family and by educational professionals will likely to experience
several psycho-social problems such as stress, depression, anxiety, inferiority, isolation, which leads to
scholastic backwardness [17]. Schmidt and Lockwood (2017) identified a significant relationship
between romantic relationship and class absence among the students. This result indicates how students
are failures to attend classes regularly and show low performance in their academics [18].
3.1. Role of family:
A family is also responsible for adolescent’s academic performance. Several family-related problems
such as separation or divorce, parental illiteracy, substance use disorder among parents, poverty, family
fitting, or any physical or mental problems among family members are the causes that influence
adolescents to stop seeking a comfortable life in their family. In this situation, they engage themselves
in a romantic relationship to fulfill their desire for happiness. Anxiety disorder or childhood depression
among adolescents which is interlinked with family issues also cause scholastic backwardness [19]. The
modernized family life lessens the amount of time and space for communication that family members
make for their children. Decreased support systems and appropriate supervision from caretakers are
also a challenge to provide a good platform to the adolescents to promote their well-being. Adolescents
are missing an important aspect of family care and love. People are busier with machinery rather than
engaging themselves with human beings. This behaviour will also have a negative impact on an
adolescent’s academic performance. Savioja (2019) found a lack of parental involvement in
adolescent’s living is a cause for risk-taking sexual behaviour among them. Therefore, appropriate
parental care and support, active involvement of the parents in the daily living of adolescents will help
them adopt good behaviour and stay protected from the negative effect of infatuation [20].
3.2. Role of Peers:
The motivation for a romantic relationship mainly comes from peers. Adolescents tend to have
membership in peer groups, which will also promote infatuation towards the opposite sex. Most of the
time peer group is a promoter of an unhealthy relationship with the opposite sex, which will negatively
impact academic achievement. This behaviour will also increase the depression among adolescents and
reduce their academic outcome. It will also motivate adolescents to withdraw from family and get
involved in unhealthy social activities [21]. Increased use of cell phones among adolescents is also a
key indicator of the tendency to be curious about a romantic relationship with the opposite sex [2].
3.3. Role of Community:
The adolescent period is an appropriate period for better socialization. If adolescents are capable of
creating social acceptance through their good behaviour, it helps them succeed their professional as
well as personal life. However, while living in this society adolescents should be careful to deal with
various consequences, which end their life. Bothe people and the social situation around the adolescents
are highly influencing their overall development [22]. Adolescents are curious to observe and adopt
social behaviour, which will attract their concentration. That be a media, people in society or any
incidents related to romantic relationships, love or infatuation around adolescents are grabbing their
attention. When adolescents are not aware and valued within the community and its principles, they are
easily influenced to commit a mistake [23].
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3.4. Role of Teachers:
High expectation than the actual ability of the students, negative feedback, over control, not being able
to understand student’s feelings and the imbalanced relationship between teachers and students are the
key indicators to the adolescents to be distracted from studies and get influenced of negative social
behaviour. In such a situation adolescent even seek a supportive and comfortable relationship from the
opposite sex, which will also negatively affect their academic performance. The lack of teacher’s
attention towards understanding changing behaviour and imbalanced emotions of adolescents is an area
to provoke adolescents to be isolated from the home and school or from the adults [24] [25].
4. INFATUATION & ROMANTIC RELATIONSHIP :
Infatuation is a strong romantic feeling in the state of unreasoned behaviour or passion towards the
opposite sex. Infatuation surprisingly occurs and it becomes too deep and more influential over time,
but it is just for a short time. Irrespective of family, ethnicity, geographical background both boys and
girls tend to be curious and attentive towards cross-sex friendship or romantic relationship [26].
Adolescents with infatuation feel only the positive side of their partners. Adolescents with infatuation
are more focused on the physical aspects of the partner rather than their overall good. They also adopt
jealousy and possessiveness and they neglect other relationships, especially with parents, teachers and
other caretaking adults. The adolescents with infatuation will be selfish and most of the time being rude
to others [27]. These types of infatuation have an unhealthy outcome in adolescent’s day-to-day
living. Adolescents are much into infatuation separate themselves from supportive friendship networks.
Sometimes even they express violent behaviour within their romantic relationship. Social media is
playing a major role between adolescent’s romantic relationships. Aggression in such a relationship
leads to several problems like school dropout, being absent to the class, lack of concentration, negative
attitude towards learning, fail to meet the learning requirements, etc. [28] [29]. The misinterpretation
of infatuation as love is one of the major causes for problematic acting-out behaviours, such as self-
harm, depression, low self-esteem, feelings of helpless, hopeless and worthless [30].
Janardhana and Manjula (2018) found that adolescent girls thinking that having sexual intercourse with
their romantic partner is a method to get parent’s approval for marriage. They also noted a romantic
relationship leading to school dropout and academic failure among adolescents [31]. Most adolescents
with infatuation tend to watch online pornography [32]. This behavour leads to teenage pregnancy,
sexual abuse, problems in the relationship with family, friends and teachers, or any mental health
problems. Adolescents addicting to online pornography watching show a lack of interest in learning.
Miranda et al., (2019) identified that a romantic relationship affects Attention Deficit Hyperactivity
Disorder (ADHD) among adolescents [33]. Too much infatuation or feeling about the romantic
relationship will be negatively affected on adolescent’s day-to-day living behaviour. [34]. A
relationship breakup is commonly found among adolescents irrespective of male and female. Even most
adolescents in the above group were been identified with several mental health problems such as self-
harm and suicide [35]. Herrera et al., (2006) found that breakup in a romantic relationship is also an
important cause for suicide. This study highlighted effects of teenage infatuation on adolescent's mental
health & learning behaviour [36].
5. OBJECTIVES :
The study is intended to identify the impact of infatuation on learning behaviour of school-going
adolescents. Therefore, the first objective of the study is to identify the status of infatuation among
adolescents. The second objective is to understand the behavioural response of adolescents towards
learning. Finally, the study is to find the impact of infatuation on learning behaviour of the adolescents
and recommend for the needful caregiving and education for different stakeholders.
6. METHOD :
The study is descriptive in nature. A total of 108 students were randomly selected from one of the
educational institutions in Mangaluru district, Karnataka, India. In this selected sample 79.62 percent
(86) were male and 20.37 percent (22) were female included. The samples were adolescents aged
between 13 years to 18 years studying in VIII, IX, X, XI and XII classes. Researcher developed
questionnaire to determine the status of infatuation, external influence for infatuation and learning
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behaviour of adolescents. The questionnaire was constructed under three categories, which included ten
questions each. The researcher validated the developed questionnaire by three subject experts. Both
Interview and questionnaire method were used for data collection.
7. RESULT :
7.1. Personal Data:
A number of respondents taken for the study are 108. Male respondents were 86 (79%) and female were
22 (20%) in which forty-two respondents aged between 12 and 14 years, 40 respondents between 14
and 16 years and 26 respondents between 16 and 18 years. Education wise distribution of the sample is
26 (24%) from class VIII, 34 (31%) from class IX, 20 (18%) from class X, 10 (9%) from class XI, and
18 (16%) respondents from class XII. Locality wise distribution is 92 (85%) of the respondents
belonging to an urban area and 16 (14%) respondents belong to a rural area.
7.2. Family Data:
Family wise distribution is, 98 (90%) respondent’s family is nuclear families and 10 (9%) families are
joint families. 48 (44%) respondent’s fathers are degree and above educated, 36 (33%) respondent’s
fathers are above tenth and above educated and 24 (22%) respondent’s fathers are below tenth educated.
32 (29%) respondent’s fathers are private employees, 52 (48) are doing business 16 (14%) are
government job holders and 8 (7%) have no job. 64 (59%) respondent’s mothers are degree and above
educated, 36 (33%) respondent’s mothers are above the tenth and above educated and 8 (7%)
respondent’s mothers are below tenth educated. 20 (18%) respondent’s mothers are private employees,
56 (51%) are home maker 20 (18%) are government job holders and 16 (14%) are doing their own
business. No respondent’s family income is below 20000, 12 (11%) respondents family income is above
20000 and below 50000, 20 (18%) respondents family income is above 50000 and below one lack and
76 (70%) respondent’s family income is more than one lack.
7.3. Status of Infatuation:
40% male and 48% female know the difference between love and infatuation. 46% male and 38%
female respondents reported that they have experienced romantic feelings. 32% of male and 24% of
female respondents have experienced romantic relationship with the opposite sex.
Fig. 1: Status of infatuation & romantic relationship.
68% male and 82% female respondents reported that they have fear on parents and teachers to have a
romantic relationship. 32% male and 30% female have still continued their relationship with their
romantic partners. 30% male and 38% female respondents reported that they dropped out of a romantic
relationship. 56% male and 74% female respondents are aware of the negative impact of infatuation or
romantic relationships on their academic performance.
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Fig. 2: Status of Infatuation & romantic relationship.
7.4. Role of the Peer Group, Social Media & Society:
The report of the data collected from the samples indicates that 44% male and 28% female respondents
often fall into the distraction by the peer influence towards opposite-sex attraction. 74% male and 42%
female respondents reported that they discuss infatuation or romantic relationship with their peers. 74%
male and 68% female respondents said the peer group is the most influential group towards infatuation
or romantic relationship. 48% male and 40% female respondents said social media is also the highest
influencing towards infatuation or romantic relationship. 18% male and 16% female respondents
reported neighbourhood and family have an influence towards infatuation or romantic relationships.
Fig. 3: Role of social media, peer group & society.
7.5. Infatuation and Learning Behaviour:
52% male and 74 female respondents reported that they are aware of the negative impact of infatuation
and romantic relationship on academic their performance. 18% females and 36% male respondents
reported that currently their learning is distracted by infatuation or romantic relationships.48% male
and 26% female have past experience of getting distracted in their learning due to infatuation or
romantic relationships. 58% male and 44% female said they felt bored to attend class when they are in
a romantic relationship. 52% male and 48% female reported that they lost learning interest due to
infatuation or romantic relationships.
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Fig. 4: Infatuation & learning behaviour.
12% females and 20% male reported that they sometimes used to skip from the class due to infatuation
or romantic relationships. 44% of male and 26% of female respondents are low in their academic
performance. 36% male and 38% female respondents reported that they have experienced stress due to
infatuation or romantic relationships. 14% female respondents sometimes they report teachers or family
members about their problems related to infatuation or romantic relationship. However, no male
respondents report to teachers or family members about their problems related to infatuation or romantic
relationship.
Fig. 5: Infatuation & learning behaviour.
8. DISCUSSION :
The study explored the impact of infatuation on learning behaviour of school-going adolescents.
Obtained data revealed that around half of the respondents aware of differences between love and
infatuation, which mean more than fifty per cent of the respondents not aware of these differences. This
result shows how the adolescents are lacking appropriate education and awareness about love and
romantic relationship. The study also identified most of the male respondents experienced romantic
feelings than female respondents. Even in experiencing a romantic relationship with opposite sex male
respondents are higher than female respondents [37]. However, male children have a special concern in
Indian society and they also enjoy all freedom compare to female children. This concern towards male
children may be by the fear among female children on parents and teachers to have a romantic
relationship compare to boys. Around thirty per cent of male and female respondents are currently in a
romantic relationship with opposite sex same per cent of male and female respondents dropped from
such relation. However, the significant majority of the female respondents compared to male
respondents are aware that the infatuation or romantic relationship has a negative impact on their
academic performance [38].
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The data obtained in this study are also indicating that the majority of the male respondents reported
that peer group influence towards opposite-sex attraction. They also discuss a romantic relationship
with their friends. Since adolescent age is a time for independence and these children spend more time
outside and in school with their friends rather than with parents in the home, most female respondents
to agree that peer group is the most influencing group towards infatuation or romantic relationship [2].
Male and female respondents equally accepted that even social media has highest influenced towards
infatuation or romantic relationship. Excessive availability of digital technologies such as mobile and
computers are the major reason behind social media effect on infatuation [39]. Compare to male
respondents female respondents are highly aware of the negative impact of infatuation and romantic
relationship on academic their performance. Most male respondents are currently under learning
distraction by infatuation or romantic relationship. The majority of male respondents compare to female
respondents reported that they have past experience of getting distracted in their learning due to
infatuation or romantic relationship. Male and female respondents are almost equally felt bored to attend
class and they lost learning interest due to infatuation or romantic relationship.
Most male respondents are performing low in their academics compare to female respondents.
However, both male and female respondents are equally reported that they have experienced stress due
to infatuation or romantic relationship [37]. Less majority of the female respondents sometimes report
to teachers or family members about their problems related to infatuation or romantic relationship.
However, no male respondents report to teachers or family members about their problems related to
infatuation or romantic relationship. Parents should maintain continues attention towards their
children’s daily activities and behaviour. Adolescents will become healthy adults if their family remains
actively take part in providing good parenting, love and care throughout the process of developing
maturity. Parents can actively involve when they well educated on the physical, cognitive, social, and
emotional changes that occur during adolescence. If the parents pay their attention towards adolescent’s
issues by providing timely support, increasingly they perform in their academics. To develop academic
partnerships between educational institutions and family, the educational professional can consider the
parents as ethical and behavioural models for their children. They also can encourage parents to
communicate with their children to understand their expectations properly and respectfully. Although
adolescence is specially considered for growing independence and separation from parental control, the
adolescent still needs the family’s care, love, support, and availability, where they can live away from
several physicals, emotional, and social problems and involve actively in their day to day learning. [40]
Adolescents need family members, educators, health professionals, and counsellors to solve their
problems. They should help adolescents through their active listening, respecting their confidentiality
and responding immediately to their problems. Mental and physical healthcare professionals need to
develop innovative approaches to effectively engage adolescents in process of caring and nurturing.
Using positive peer influence is an effective method for adolescent academic enhancement. A good
supervision plays an important role in strengthening the partnership between the educational
professionals, family, and adolescents in major ways: providing them accurate information about
adolescent’s social, emotional and academic issues. Encouraging and trying to develop positive habits
in adolescents and recognizing their unique qualities. Therefore, parents must be educated and students
in the schools and colleges must be created awareness about the infatuation and romantic relationship.
Parents should take initiative to encourage their children to express their feelings [41][42]. Mental
health assistance to be provided in each school through which children can find solutions for problems
related infatuation or romantic relationship. Even teacher student’s relationship should be well
maintained to keep students encouraged to take their help to understand the infatuation [43].
9. CONCLUSION :
Our study highlights that most respondents have experienced distraction, stress and low academic
performance due to infatuation and romantic relationship. The study also shows a negative learning
behaviour been expressed by adolescents in infatuation or romantic relations. It is recommended to
create awareness among teachers and parents in the school and home to provide appropriate support
and care to the adolescents. Different programs to be planned to strengthen adolescents in their capacity
to cope with challenges. Help adolescents be capable to manage the distraction and improve their
academic performance. A flexible environment in the school and home to be created to make the
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adolescents develop positive behaviour towards learning. The study also suggested for the further
investigation on the related areas on the large group of adolescents to explore further possibilities of
impacts of infatuation and romantic relation on learning behaviour.
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