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A review on ethnobotany, phytochemistry and pharmacology on Terminalia belerica (Bibhitaki)

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Abstract

Terminalia belerica Roxb. is belonging to family combretaceae, which is growing widely throughout the Indian subcontinent, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri-Lanka, and South East Asia. It is is used in several traditional medicines to cure various diseases. There are different phytoconstituents Glucoside, Tannins, ellagic acid, ethylgallate, gallylglucose, chebulanic acid which are responsible for its wide therapeutic actions. It is mainly used as antioxidant, antimicrobial, antidiarrhoeal, anticancer, antidiabetic, antihypertensive and hepatoprotective agent. This review article sites the information of different pharmacological activities of Terminalia belerica which may be source for further research studies. Keywords: Phytoconstituents, pharmacologicalactivities, Terminaliabelerica, therapeutic actions.
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... Additionally, T. belerica shown antibacterial activity against a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, such as Corynebacterium rubrum, Staphylococcus epidermidis, K. pneumonie, etc. Nevertheless, research has revealed that antibacterial activity was associated with the polar extracts [17] . ...
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... Additionally, T. belerica shown antibacterial activity against a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, such as Corynebacterium rubrum, Staphylococcus epidermidis, K. pneumonie, etc. Nevertheless, research has revealed that antibacterial activity was associated with the polar extracts [17] . ...
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Chapter
Nearly all cultures, from ancient times to today, have used plants as a source of medicine. In many developing countries, traditional medicine is still the mainstay of health care and most of the drugs and cures used come from plants. In developed countries many people are turning to herbal remedies. With this widespread use has come the assumption that plants identified as having medicinal qualities will be available on a continuing basis. However no concerted effort has been made to ensure this and in the face of the threats of increasing demand, a vastly increasing human population and extensive forest destruction, there can be no guarantee that we will continue to benefit indefinitely from this valuable resource. In light of this situation the World Health Organisation held a meeting in 1988. This book is the outcome of that meeting, detailing in a series of papers by leading experts the problems of which need to be addressed, the existing experiences from a range of countries and the future direction which must be taken to ensure the conservation of the world's medicinal plants.
Book
Bridging the gap between the ancient art of herbalism and the emerging sciences of ethnopharmocology and phytopharmacotherapy, this book highlights the major breakthroughs in the history of the field and focuses on future directions in the discovery and application of herb-derived medicines. Implementing the concept of reverse pharmacology, it integrates documented clinical and experiential "hits" into pharmacological leads by transdisciplinary exploratory studies. It further develops these into drug candidates by experimental and clinical research.
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The importance of fruit powder of Terminalia belerica was investigated for its hepatoxicity effect in Wistar Albino rats against CCl 4 induced hepatic damage. Oral administration of 1 gm/kg body weight of powder of Terminalia belerica fruit recovered the CCl 4 induced liver damage. The elevated levels of tissue and blood biochemical markers were reported. The administration of Terminalia belerica plant material recovered the enzyme levels like normal rats. The biochemical observations were supplemented by histoapthological examination of liver. The results of blood and tissue biochemical parameters like Aspartate aminotramferase, Alanine aminottramferase, Alkaline phosphatase, etc reveled that Terminalia belerica fruit powder could regenerates liver cells and offered protection against CCl 4 induced hepatic damage. The observation of markers as well as Light and electron microscope photographs supports the regeneration process of liver parenchyma.