Technical ReportPDF Available

A review of the pollinators associated with decaying wood, old trees and tree wounds in Great Britain

Authors:
  • Steven Falk

Abstract

A provisional listing of over 320 species of British flower-visiting insects (mostly Coleoptera, Diptera and aculeate Hymenoptera) that are fully or substantially reliant on old trees, dead wood, tree wounds and other timber for larval development. The report summarises the ecology (including larval biology and floral preferences), distribution, status and broad conservation requirements for most species. The report also explains in more general terms the conservation requirements for this assemblage as a whole and is liberally furnished with photographs of the insects and their key habitats.
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... Thanks are due to the Woodland Trust for commissioning this review and also to the various entomologists who provided information for the technical report (Falk 2021; www.britishecologicalsociety.org/applied-ecology-resources/ document/20210100953) on which this article is based. ...
Article
A review of the flower-visiting insects that develop or nest in dead wood and tree wounds. Acts as a less technical summary of the Woodland Trust report publicy accessible on Researchgate here: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/349319059_A_review_of_the_pollinators_associated_with_decaying_wood_old_trees_and_tree_wounds_in_Great_Britain
... Dead wood in sunny locations with cavities and beetle holes can also be used as nesting sites for aerial-nesting bees such as Osmia, Megachile and Chelostoma species; also, aerial-nesting wasps such as Ectemnius, Ancistrocerus, Crossocerus and Pemphredon species (and the assorted cleptoparasites and inquilines associated with these such as chrysidid wasps and certain sarcophagid and anthomyiid flies). A review of pollinators associated with dead wood and old trees has recently been compiled by the author (Falk, 2021);  Wet ground and shallow water -for the larvae of hoverflies such as Eristalis, Helophilus, Parhelophilus, Orthonevra and Chrysogaster species and some muscid flies such as Graphomya species;  The nests of ground-nesting bees of wasps -for assorted cleptoparasites, parasitoids and inquilines such as cuckoo bees of the genera Nomada and Sphecodes, Bombylius beeflies and anthomyiids of the genera Leucophora. Such nests tend to be located in bare or sparsely vegetated dry ground fully exposed to the sun;  Specific foodplants -for pollinators with phytophagous larvae such as butterflies and moths, sawflies, Cheilosia hoverflies, and certain anthomyiids of the genera Pegomya, Botanophila and Delia; ...
Technical Report
Full-text available
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Technical Report
Full-text available
One of four sheets that explain how to manage important habitat mosaics for associated assemblages of Section 41 invertebrate species i.e. Species of Principal Conservation Importance in England. This one features wood pasture and other sites with concentrations of old trees plus the important features that these sites can contain such veteran trees, dead trees, stumps, detached dead wood, semi-natural grassland, heathland, woodland, scrub, hedges, orchards, wetlands, waterbodies, tall herb, bramble, nettle beds, Ivy, grazing stock, dung and wild vertebrates. These sheets were published by Buglife with sponsorship from Natural England and were written by Steven Falk.
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This book provides an introduction to the the hoverflies (Diptera, Syrphidae) of the British Isles. It covers all genera but only 60% of the fauna, and was designed as a companion to the monograph (Stubbs & Falk, 2002). It is extensively illustrated with close-ups of features that are important in making firm identifications. Additional information is provided on hoverfly ecology and collecting techniques, legislation and recording hoverflies. A complete systematic list is included for the time of publication - this is now somewhat out of date with new additions to the British fauna. Originally published in 2013, it was substantially expanded for the second edition in 2015.
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