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Functional Microbiome for Crop Improvement Under a Changing Environment

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Abstract

In a context of a changing environment, it is crucial to maximize our knowledge on all the mechanisms involved in plant microbiome interactions at the genetic, physiological, and ecological levels. This chapter reviews some recent advances in plant microbiome investigations and describes potential applications of such associations for the mitigation of both abiotic and biotic stresses to improve crop health and productivity. Understanding the full potential of microbes in the ecosystem functioning in general and their complex beneficial interactions in improving agriculture productivity in particular requires the development and improvement of compatible tools that can be verified in biological assays, always bearing in mind their reproducibility in situ on different scales. Progress in the engineering microbiome have made it possible to show how meta‐omics (metataxonomic, metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, and metaproteomics) can be potentially powerful tools to gain deeper knowledge of the functional capabilities of the microbiome and how they can shape ecosystems.
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