Conference Paper

Response Variations of a Cable Stayed Bridge Under SVEGM

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Abstract

p>Spatially variable earthquake ground motions yield the different structural demands compared to the conventional synchronous ground motions. In this paper, a cable-stayed bridge under on-site recorded spatially variable earthquake ground motions is analyzed and phenomena of response amplification based on in-situ monitoring are investigated. A calibrated numerical model of target bridge is prepared and both multi support excitation and synchronous excitation analyses are performed. The modal amplitudes of different structural components corresponding to different vibration modes are compared. The comparative analysis clarified the variation of overall response and localized amplification of engineering demands. MSE method at design phase should be considered to disclose the critical scenarios which are hard to identify by conventional design approaches.</p

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