Thesis

Цахим сургалтаар оюутны сурах арга барил, сурлагын амжилтыг дээшлүүлэх нь (Их, дээд сургуулийн математикийн хичээлийн жишээн дээр)

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Abstract

Investigating students' self-regulated learning and academic achievement in an eLearning environment (The case of university mathematics course)\\ Rationale of research\\ In the result of rapid development of ICT, the rise of new demands and changes in the structure of industries, communications, culture, skills and competences lead to enormous positive changes in the society and individuals (Marcelo & Eugenio, 2009). Consequently, researchers studying the proper uses of ICT in all levels of education and factors influencing these, from the various aspects. For the case of our country most researches done in the direction of development and experiment e-learning contents for certain course and making analysis and conclusions. In such researches usually consider the role, needs, efficiencies and advantages of use of e-learnings in education. On the other hand, there are less detailed study on perception of students towards e-learning, factors influencing these perceptions and acceptance of technologies. In most cases researchers studied the efficiency of e-learning by comparing achievements of students in traditional and e-learning groups. For new century learners with intense development of ICT, the systematic research on possibility of development and improvement of study skills, attitude and motivation through e-learning, and thus to increase academic achievement is lacking. Hence the explanation of efficiency of e-learning by studying how factors related to e-learning affect students learning skills and academic achievements, and based on the results of such studies to develop methodologies for increase of efficiency of e-learning are crucial. In other words, there are real needs to develop theoretical model which explains the relationships between student achievement and e-learning systematically, and to study relationship between factors. The current international research practice lies on researching relationships between variables by determining reliability and validity of measures of variables in the theoretical model. In Mongolia, e-learning environments have been studied, in particular, e-learning readiness and technology acceptance have been measured and used in some studies. But in most cases the study of reliability and validity of measurement models were not considered. In some researches the reliability was touched but with less appropriateness and needed more detailed research. The study of reliability of validity of measurement is a crucial issue in education measurement. Therefore, the development of the Mongolian version of measurement models to measure variables in the theoretical model and determination of their reliability and validity are very important. \\ Goal of the research\\ To study opportunities to improve students learning skills and achievement through e-learning and make related conclusions.\\ Research objectives\\ We proposed following research objectives in order to achieve our goal: To summarize theories and concepts of academic achievements and learning skills. To analyze problems related with higher education teaching and learning, and theoretical and practical problems of e-learning; To summarize theories and methodologies on learning based on learning management systems (LMS); To study 3P model and other measurement theories and make conclusion. To experiment e-learning courses based on LMS and summarize results. To study students learning skills and academic achievements and summarize results. To develop guidelines and recommendations based on the results of research\\ Research sample \\ The sample data gathered from students who studied a general education course of Mathematics of National University of Mongolia in spring semester of 2019. These students attended the course using web based LMS. The information on student’s readiness for e-learning and experiences with LMS were collected from 139, 97 and 86 responses of students at the beginning, middle and end of the course through online survey. From all these the responses of 83 students who participated in all three surveys met the requirements and used for the study. \\ Conclusion\\ The main purpose of the research is to study the ways to improve learning skills and academic achievements of university level students through e-learning based on LMS. Therefore, based on the results of the study that meet the objectives of the study, the following conclusions are made. We studied, analyzed and summarized International and national research results on student readiness for e-learning, perceived use of LMS and learning skills. This study result shows that it is necessary to pay attention to the concept and policy issues of e-learning in our country's universities. In other words, it is important to develop and implement methodologies to improve the effectiveness of e-learning based on the results of theoretical and systematic research. Based on the study and summarization of theory of higher education teaching and learning and learning skills, e-learning theory concepts and methodological issues, an e-learning course was developed to support students' self-directed learning through LMS. The math e-learning pilot course curriculum to support students' learning through LMS was developed based on cognitive, psychology, curriculum, and didactic theories. The curriculum based on our experience of the last 10 years of teaching general education math course of NUM which has achieved certain qualitative and quantitative results. The proposed measurement models for students readiness for e-learning and acceptance of e-learning are shown to be reliable (α=.841-.965, α=.650-.764) and valid (χ^2/df = 1.33 (p=.003), CFI = 0.94, TLI = 0.95, RMSEA = .063; χ^2/df = 1.54 (p=.000), CFI = 0.93, TLI = 0.91, RMSEA = .081). The proposed research model, the 3P model of e-learning, is appropriate (χ ^ 2 / df = 1.30 (p = .060), CFI = 0.97, TLI = 0.96, RMSEA = .061), hence the relation between e-learning and student learning success structure can be explained with the use of this model. It has been shown that the main goal of higher education, that is to improve students' learning skills, self-learning with self-management and motivation, and to have a positive impact on their lifelong learning skills, which in turn can affect their academic success, can be achieved through LMS.

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This study was designed to identify those learner attributes that may be used to predict student success (in terms of grade point average) in a Web-based distance education setting. Students enrolled in six Web-based, general education distance education courses at a community college were asked to complete the Group Embedded Figures Test for field dependence/independence and the Online Technologies Self-Efficacy Scale to determine their entry-level confidence with necessary computer skills for online learning. Although the students who were more field independent tended to have higher online technologies self-efficacy, they did not receive higher grades than those students who were field dependent and had lower online technologies self-efficacy. Cognitive style scores and online technologies self-efficacy scores were poor predictors of student success in online distance education courses.
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In the age of our mobile learning, an impending onus is placed on educational institutions to embrace this technological innovation that is widely accepted, used, and available globally. The clear societal value of mobile technology as a productivity tool for engagement, creation, and collaboration has generated a new need for education to revisit existing instructional paradigms constrained by physical walls and time. Mobile learning (mLearning) creates a venue to promote a culture of participation where learners and leaders alike can engage in combined efforts with multiplicative outcomes of greater success. This article explores the factors that national, state, and local educational organizations must understand in order to make steps toward successful integration of mLearning technology. Characteristics necessary for effective and efficient use of mLearning strategies for educators are also examined.
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In recent years, the use of mobile technologies has increased in a number of fields such as banking, economy, tourism, entertainment, library research, etc. These developments have also led to the use of mobile technologies for educational purposes. The successful integration of mobile learning (m-learning) technologies in education primarily demands that teachers' and students' adequacy and perceptions of such technology should be determined. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare teachers' and students' abilities and perceptions concerning m-learning. Research data for the analysis were obtained from a sample of 467 teachers and 1556 students from 32 schools that were surveyed in Northern Cyprus. Based on our results, we conclude that teachers and students want to use m-learning in education. Their perceptions are positive but their m-learning adequacy levels are not sufficient.