Article

Changes in taste and smell of food during prostate cancer treatment

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Abstract

PurposeThe present study examined the prevalence of changes in the taste and smell of food among men with advanced prostate cancer who were receiving hormone therapy and/or chemotherapy.Method Participants were 75 men with advanced prostate cancer treated at an academic medical center. They completed a prospective survey about nausea while eating, taste and smell of food, and appetite periodically during a mean of 1.3 years of follow-up. Demographics, treatments, and weight data were extracted from electronic health records. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine the associations between the presence of the symptoms surveyed, treatments, and weight loss of ≥10%.ResultsParticipants experienced poor taste of food (17%) and poor smell of food (8%) during the study. Nausea was associated with an increased likelihood of experiencing poor taste (50.0% v 12.3%, OR=7.13, P=.008) and smell (30.0% v 4.6%, OR=8.86, P=.016) of food. Poor taste of food was associated with an increased likelihood of experiencing poor appetite (35.0% v 10.9%, OR=12.43, P<.001). Participants were more likely to experience poor taste of food at any point in the study if they were being treated with denosumab (35.0% v 10.9%, OR=4.40, P=.020) or docetaxel (41.7% v 12.7%, OR=4.91, P=.022). Participants were more likely to experience ≥10% weight loss if experiencing poor taste of food (38.4% v 8.6%, OR=6.63, P=.010) or poor appetite (60.0% v 6.6%, OR=21.38, P<.001).Conclusion Clinicians should query patients for changes in taste and smell of food, especially if they are experiencing weight loss.

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... ancer is a group of diseases characterized by the uncontrolled proliferation of cells in any part of the body and has numerous signs, symptoms, and treatment approaches [1][2][3]. Cancer is also a life-threatening disease. The number of cancer patients has increased dramatically in recent decades. ...
... In reducing or eliminating taste alterations that develop as a result of chemotherapy, patients can use Complementary and Integrative Medicine (CIM) methods instead of or along with pharmacological treatments [8,10,11,14,15]. Complementary medicine is a group of treatment methods aimed at supporting modern medicine, improving patients' quality of life, reducing symptoms or the side effects of drugs, and providing physical and psychological support [1,8,16]. In the United States, according to NCCIH (the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health), "integrative health brings conventional and complementary approaches together in a coordinated way" [9,14,15]. ...
... The first part concerned the patient's demographic data, and the second part was about the use of CIM. The data collection form was developed by the researchers in line with the literature [1,9,13,15,21]. This data collection consisted of questions about patients' sociodemographic characteristics, disease-related characteristics, CIM use experi-ences, and attitudes towards CIM. ...
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How well do medical oncologists’ perceptions reflect their patients’ reported physical and psychosocial problems? Data from a survey of five oncologists
  • S Newell
  • R W Sanson-Fisher
  • A Girgis
  • A Bonaventura