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What is the role of temperature in the long-term storage of sugar beets, including on the sugar loss mechanisms of respiration and rot. Rates of mechanical damage are also considered.
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Long Term Storage of Sugar Beets
and the Role of Temperature
William English
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU
Faculty of Landscape Architecture, Horticulture and Crop Production Science
Introductory paper at the Faculty of Landscape Architecture, Horticulture
and Crop Production Science, 2020:14
2020
Long Term Storage of Sugar Beets and the Role of
Temperature
William English
Publisher:
Year of publication:
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Keywords:
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences,
Department of Biosystems and Technology
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Faculty of Landscape
Architecture, Horticulture and Crop Production Science
2020
Alnarp
William English
Introductory paper at the Faculty of Landscape Architecture,
Horticulture and Crop Production Science
2020:14
Sugar beet, post-harvest, storage, temperature
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