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Energy Healing Therapies: A Systematic Review and Critical Appraisal

Authors:

Abstract

In this paper, we reviewed the ten popular mind-body energy healing therapies. They are Ray 72000 nadis healing, Reiki healing, Ray 114 chakras healing, Pranic healing, Music therapy, EFT healing, Theata Healing, Cognitive Behavior Therapy, and Touch Therapy. As these mind-body energy therapies are not invasive, they are considered to be safe. Energy healing therapy is based on the understandings that the body and mind has an invisible energy field, and that when this energy flow is blocked or unbalanced, one can become sick. Unblocking this energy can help promote healing and wellbeing. There are many kinds of energy therapies, some which use treatments such as light, sound, and magnets and some use several mind-body techniques. Mind-body energy healing techniques are based on mantras, meditations, breathing exercises, physical exercises and relaxations, on the belief that human thoughts, feelings and emotions can affect both physical and mental wellbeing. This systematic review and analysis was conducted with the aim of assessing the efficacy of the popular mind-body to develop a reproducible common framework mind-body energy healing therapies. In this review paper, we also highlights the technical challenges in energy healing modalities and describe how to incorporate the emerging trends in energy medicine with the modern medical system. Despite some trials demonstrating the benefits of energy healing therapies for immediate and long-term relief in patients, on the whole, there is lack of high-quality scientific evidence substantiating its routine use. There is a need for more robust randomized control trials (RCTs) utilizing standardized protocols to provide further evidence on this subject. We conclude with a discussion and presentation of promising future directions of energy healing modalities.
Health Psychology Review 162 January, 2021 | Volume 2 | No. 3
Energy Healing Therapies: A Systematic
Review and Critical Appraisal
L. Rogers, K. Phillips, N. Cooper
School of Psychology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, T.U. Munich.
Abstract:
In this paper, we reviewed the ten popular mind-body energy healing therapies. They are Ray
72000 nadis healing, Reiki healing, Ray 114 chakras healing, Pranic healing, Music therapy, EFT
healing, Theata Healing, Cognitive Behavior Therapy, and Touch Therapy. As these mind-body
energy therapies are not invasive, they are considered to be safe.
Energy healing therapy is based on the understandings that the body and mind has an invisible
energy field, and that when this energy flow is blocked or unbalanced, one can become sick.
Unblocking this energy can help promote healing and wellbeing. There are many kinds of energy
therapies, some which use treatments such as light, sound, and magnets and some use several
mind-body techniques. Mindbody energy healing techniques are based on mantras, meditations,
breathing exercises, physical exercises and relaxations, on the belief that human thoughts, feelings
and emotions can affect both physical and mental wellbeing.
This systematic review and analysis was conducted with the aim of assessing the efficacy of the
popular mind-body to develop a reproducible common framework mind-body energy healing
therapies. In this review paper, we also highlights the technical challenges in energy healing
modalities and describe how to incorporate the emerging trends in energy medicine with the
modern medical system. Despite some trials demonstrating the benefits of energy healing therapies
for immediate and long-term relief in patients, on the whole, there is lack of high-quality scientific
evidence substantiating its routine use. There is a need for more robust randomized control trials
(RCTs) utilizing standardized protocols to provide further evidence on this subject. We conclude
with a discussion and presentation of promising future directions of energy healing modalities.
Keywords: Energy healing, Reiki, 72000 nadis, Music therapy, 114 chakra healing, CBT, Pranic
healing, EFT.
Health Psychology Review 163 January, 2021 | Volume 2 | No. 3
1. INTRODUCTION
Mindbody energy healing therapies focus on the relationships among the mind, body, brain,
bioenergy and behavior, and their effect on health and disease. Relieving suffering is the ancient
goal and the ethical core of any medicine [1]. More recently, researchers observed [2] that the
modern clinical care rarely addresses the sufferings of the chronic patients, and recommended
two approaches to relieve it. The first, diagnosing and treating disease to remove the source of
suffering, and the second is “turning toward.It involves being open to the patient’s experience so
to enter the patient’s world [2]. Energy healing modalities has a vast role to overcome these issues.
We reviewed here, the ten mind-body energy healing modalities. They are the compassion based
Ray 72000 nadis healing [3], Reiki healing, Ray 114 chakras healing [4], Pranic healing, Music
therapy, EFT healing, Theata Healing, Cognitive Behavior Therapy, and Touch Therapy.
Holistic energy healing are traditional alternative healing systems that restores the balance and
flow of energy throughout the body, mind, and soul. Through energy healing modalities, the
healers tries to break the defective energetic patterns that creates diseases. The main strength of
holistic healing modalities is the power to enter into the patient’s internal world and cure them and
the second strength is treating the disease from the source. The healers utilize various methods of
practices, including mantra, laying on of hands, prayer, and induced altered states of
consciousness.
These techniques work directly with the physical, emotional and spiritual aspects of well-being. It
is used to treat various medical conditions, especially ailments related to mental health. The
practitioner works on the energy body or aura of the person. Diseases, which appear as energetic
disruptions in the energy bodies (aura), manifest as ailments in the body. This is cleansed and
energized by the energy healing techniques and thereby accelerating the healing process of the
physical body.
All these healing modalities put special emphasis on divergent aspects of the relationship and the
interaction between doctor/healer/therapist and the person in therapy/patient/client. Building
healthy relationship is considered crucial for the healing/ therapeutic process.
Health Psychology Review 164 January, 2021 | Volume 2 | No. 3
Chronic disease patients may benefit from these holistic health care techniques and research has
begun to consider the physiological and psychological changes that occur after energy healing
processes. Epigenetic effects of the energy healing modalities are the key areas of modern research.
The following sections review the ten popular holistic healing therapies.
2. TEN TOP ENERGY HEALING MODALITIES
2.1 Ray 72000 Nadi Healing Therapy
The compassion based Ray 72000 Nadis Healing Therapy was founded by Sri Amit Ray in the
year 2009 [3]. Nadis are psychic energy channels in the human body. There are 72000 energy
channels in the body. Ray, classified the 72000 energy channels in a hierarchical manner. Here,
healing is the process of reorganizing, cleaning and balancing the energy channels in the body,
through a group of specific meditations, breathing exercises and other modalities.
In the Ray’s meditation system, a group of higher energy channels are used to access and mobilize
the universal healing energies in different pathways in the body. The Ray Nadi System assume
that the diseases or behavioral disorders are due to the blockages and disturbances in the energy
channels. Once the blockages in the energy channels are removed the self-healing process will
start [3, 5].
Researches are going on to identify the associations between physiological and psychological
symptoms linked with the nadis the energy channels. The connection with the higher healing
energy is done through special manta rituals, initiations and breathing exercises. There are five
specific cleaning processes. They are done in five stages. Ray said, “The 72000 nadis healing
meditation helps a patient to gain a new perspective, reconnect with the inner world, and find a
new blissful and respectful divine identity [3].
2.2 Ray 114 Chakra Healing Therapy
Ray 114 Chakra Healing Therapy was founded by Sri Amit Ray in 2015 [3, 6]. Chakras are the
psychic energy vortexes in the human body. Ray rediscovered the names, locations and the
functions of the 114 chakras for the first time [6]. There are 114 psychic energy wheels in human
body. Ray’s 114-chakra system based healing process are based on two primary principles (i) the
modularity of the self-healing processes by activating the energy centers in a sequential manner,
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enabling the self-organization of the healing processes; and (ii) the dynamic restructuring of the
self-healing process of body-mind-soul that provides neuro plasticity and adaptation through
mantra, meditation, relaxations, breathing exercises, lights, colors and affirmations [3]. Ray,
classified the 114 energy vortexes in a hierarchical manner. Compassion, connection, intentions,
breathing exercises, mantra and meditations are the core components of Sri Amit Ray’s healing
modalities. Connection with the higher Self, inner world and others are essential part in the chakra
healing process. In this healing system, a group of higher chakras are used to access and mobilize
the universal healing energies in different pathways in the body.
2.3 Reiki Healing
Reiki was founded by Mikao Usui in the 1920s. The word Reiki is made of two Japanese words
Rei which means “God’s Wisdom or the Higher Power” and Ki which is “life force energy”. Thus,
Reiki means “spiritually guided life force energy.” The method of Reiki involves channeling the
universal life energy to stimulate the integration of mind/body/spirit to enhance the natural healing
mechanism [8]. The uniqueness of Reiki is that a special initiation from the Spirit to receive healing
energy is necessary for all Reiki practitioners. This attunement of to the Reiki energy is a form of
ritual to reconnect with the Spirit before beginning the journey of healing. Reiki is administered
by the hands, placed lightly on or near the body of the recipient. The Reiki practitioner focuses his
attention on the recipient and then allows the energy to flow passively through their body and
hands where it is passed to the recipient [9].
2.4 Pranic Healing
Prana is the Sanskrit word that means life-force. Pranic Healing is an energy treatment that uses
prana to balance, harmonize and transform the body's energy processes [10]. Developed by Master
Choa Kok Sui, a Filipino of Chinese descent, Pranic Healing leverages upon prana or life energy
to cure physical ailments.
2.5 Tai chi and qigong
Tai chi and qigong are two traditional Chinese medicine techniques that incorporate body
movement, breath, and attentional training to improve disease symptoms and maintain health.
These practices have many similarities to yoga but, in contrast, contain body movement as a critical
Health Psychology Review 166 January, 2021 | Volume 2 | No. 3
component. The practice of tai chi includes slow body positions that flow from one to the next
continuously and that promote posture, flexibility, relaxation, well-being, and mental
concentration [13].
2.6 Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT)
Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT) is a form of counseling intervention that draws on various
theories of alternative medicine including acupuncture, neuro-linguistic programming, energy
medicine, and Thought Field Therapy (TFT). It is all about fingers-tapping on the acupuncture
meridians in the body combined with positive affirmations [11]. The technique trains individuals
to tap on meridian endpoints of the body such as the top of the head, eye brows, under eyes, side
of eyes, chin, collar bone, and under the arms. While tapping, they recite specific phrases that
target an emotional component of a physical symptom.
2.7 Theta-Healing
Created by Vianna Stibal in 1995, Theta Healing is a technique that taps upon the Theta brainwaves
as well as relies upon the unconditional love of Creator of All That Is who does the actual healing
work. It is a technique that focuses on thought and prayer. While the techniques of Theta Healing
are inspired from Christianity, it is not a religion and it is open to people of all religions [14].
2.8 Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) Techniques
Psychiatrists Alfred Adler, Abraham Low and Aaron Beck were the first to practice cognitive
behavioral therapy. The key principle behind CBT is that the thought patterns affect the emotions,
which, in turn, can affect the behaviors [7]. CBT highlights how the negative thoughts can lead to
negative feelings and actions. But, by reframing the thoughts in a more positive way, one can lead
to more positive feelings and helpful behaviors. The therapist will guide the thought process in
certain situations so the person in therapy can identify negative patterns. Once they are aware of
them, they can learn how to reframe those thoughts so they become more positive and productive.
2.9 Music Therapy
Music therapy is a type of expressive arts therapy that uses music to improve and maintain the
physical, psychological, and social well-being of individuals. It involves a wide range of activities,
Health Psychology Review 167 January, 2021 | Volume 2 | No. 3
such as listening to music, singing, and playing a musical instrument. A growing body of research
confirms that music therapy is effective. It can improve medical outcomes and quality of life in a
variety of ways [12].
2.10 Therapeutic Touch (TT)
Therapeutic Touch (TT) is an alternative therapy that has gained popularity over the past two
decades for helping wounds to heal. Practitioners enter a meditative state and pass their hands
above the patient's body to find and correct any imbalances in the patient's 'life energy' or chi.
3 PROBLEMS AND CHALLENGES
Presently, there are a wide variety of energy healing methods are available in active practices. In
general, the mind-body energy healing therapies seem to work positively and improves quality of
life and quality of sleep, reduces depressive symptoms and fear and enhances mental health
conditions. However, there is virtually nothing known about how the various methods of healing
converge or diverge in terms of healing efficacy.
The reliability and reproducibility of experimental procedures is a cornerstone of scientific
practices. There is a pressing clinical need for the better representation of mind-body energy
healing protocols to enable other healers and medical practitioners to better reproduce results. A
new framework that ensures that all information required for the replication of experimental energy
healing protocols is essential to achieve reproducibility.
There is an urgent need for the standardization of energy healing research protocols. Majority of
the studies lack the randomization, blinding, and standard analytical procedures. For the
advancement of mind-body energy healing modalities, standardization at multiple levels is
essential. Standardization is for spiritual energy healing is required to facilitate data exchange
between different research groups and healers, and finally the assembly of large integrated models
providing novel medical insights.
4 CONCLUSION
In this work, we presented a review of the ten popular mind-body energy healing therapies. They
are compassion based Ray 72000 nadi healing, Reiki healing, Ray 114 chakra healing, Pranic
Health Psychology Review 168 January, 2021 | Volume 2 | No. 3
healing, Music therapy, EFT healing, Theata Healing, Cognitive Behavior Therapy, and Touch
Therapy. As these mind-body energy therapies are not invasive, they are considered to be safe.
Common terms used in the field of energy healing include energy healing, energy medicine, energy
therapies. These mind-body energy healing modalities are a group of healing techniques that
enhance the mind’s interactions with bodily function, to induce relaxation and to improve overall
health and well-being. Daily practice is essential for deriving benefit from these therapies.
The long-term objective of this research is to improve the qualitative and quantitative
understanding of the mind-body energy healing modalities in their totality, and not in a fragmented
way.
There is a need for more robust randomized control trials utilizing standardized holistic energy
healing protocols to provide further evidence on this subject. Modern drugs have enormous side-
effects. However, in the absence of harmful side effects of energy healing therapies and minimal
time required for training patients, despite weak evidences, they can be employed by nurses and
healers for the chronic patients to provide better mental relief and healing.
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Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) refers to a popular therapeutic approach that has been applied to a variety of problems. The goal of this review was to provide a comprehensive survey of meta-analyses examining the efficacy of CBT. We identified 269 meta-analytic studies and reviewed of those a representative sample of 106 meta-analyses examining CBT for the following problems: substance use disorder, schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders, depression and dysthymia, bipolar disorder, anxiety disorders, somatoform disorders, eating disorders, insomnia, personality disorders, anger and aggression, criminal behaviors, general stress, distress due to general medical conditions, chronic pain and fatigue, distress related to pregnancy complications and female hormonal conditions. Additional meta-analytic reviews examined the efficacy of CBT for various problems in children and elderly adults. The strongest support exists for CBT of anxiety disorders, somatoform disorders, bulimia, anger control problems, and general stress. Eleven studies compared response rates between CBT and other treatments or control conditions. CBT showed higher response rates than the comparison conditions in 7 of these reviews and only one review reported that CBT had lower response rates than comparison treatments. In general, the evidence-base of CBT is very strong. However, additional research is needed to examine the efficacy of CBT for randomized-controlled studies. Moreover, except for children and elderly populations, no meta-analytic studies of CBT have been reported on specific subgroups, such as ethnic minorities and low income samples.
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