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Being Bad to Look Good: Competence Reputational Stakes Can Increase Unethical Behavior

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The gay science: With a prelude in German rhymes and an appendix of songs
  • F Nietzsche
Nietzsche, F. (1974). The gay science: With a prelude in German rhymes and an appendix of songs (W. Kaufmann, Trans.). New York, NY: Vintage. (Original work published 1887)